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Brausezucker

English translation: sherbet drink powder

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Brausezucker
English translation:sherbet drink powder
Entered by: Astrid Elke Witte
Options:
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12:38 Aug 26, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Science - Food & Drink / Food industry
German term or phrase: Brausezucker
Please, can anyone tell me what either Brausezucker is, or Brausezuckerwaren? I thought possibly Brausezucker might be sherbet, but I am not really sure.
Astrid Elke Witte
Germany
Local time: 21:01
Sherbet drink(ing) powder
Explanation:
... because this is actually what it is - you can eat or drink it. See the following link:
http://www.answers.com/topic/sherbet

I know it's too late for points, but this is for reference for future askers.

I think the reason we can't find a popular term here is that - unless I'm mistaking - most other countries don't really drink in anymore. I've never come across it as a drink in the UK (see link again).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1059 days (2005-07-21 07:59:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Adding to what I just said and confirming the translation, here\'s a link:

http://www.cwlservices.com/Sherbet_drink_powder.htm
Selected response from:

Sarah Downing
Local time: 15:01
Grading comment
Thanks Naranga!

Astrid
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5fizzy drink powder
Mary McCusker
5fizzy candy
Cassandra Greer
4Sherbet drink(ing) powder
Sarah Downing
5 -1Brausepulverxxxlone
3Sounds like aerating sugar or fizz sugar or carbonating sugar
Dr. Fred Thomson
3effervescent sugar
Elisabeth Ghysels


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
effervescent sugar


Explanation:
would be the litteral translation; but it's difficult to be sure what is meant, as Brausezucker or Brausezuckerware(n) doesn't get a single hit in Google, which seems strange for a food item. Braunzucker??
Greetings,

Nikolaus

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 21:01
Grading comment
It is Brausezucker, and I found out it is sherbet.
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: It is Brausezucker, and I found out it is sherbet.

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
fizzy drink powder


Explanation:
During my childhood in Germany, we used to drink Brausepulver dissolved, a bit like Kool-Aid, but rather better-tasting. Essentially the powder would effervesce in the water - another term might be effervescent powder. I suspect that Brausezucker is another name for this, although it would depend on context.
Hope this helps


    experience
Mary McCusker
Local time: 15:01
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
Yes, I was looking for a proper word for it.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr Janine Manuel BSc BHB MBChB
5 mins

agree  Sarah Downing: Yup, a friend of mine always has it at parties - it comes in different colours and little sachets.
2 hrs

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: like Tang, Koolaid, but bubbling. Medications are also sold as Brausepulver or -tabletten
3 hrs

agree  Andrzej Lejman: same experience
7 hrs

agree  Chinoise
12 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Yes, I was looking for a proper word for it.

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
fizzy candy


Explanation:
This is the stuff that fizzles and pops (like pop rocks) when you put it on your tongue - very yummy :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-26 12:58:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in Germany there is also a powder form meant for fizzy drinks

Cassandra Greer
Local time: 21:01
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
I found out now for sure that "sherbet" is the term.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: I found out now for sure that "sherbet" is the term.

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Sounds like aerating sugar or fizz sugar or carbonating sugar


Explanation:
When you put it in water it cause thw water to fizz up.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 13:01
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I know what it is. I needed a term that sounds good.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: I know what it is. I needed a term that sounds good.

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Brausepulver


Explanation:
Could it be Brausepulver? This is also sweet (sugar). If this is the case, maybe you should leave it in German?

See site for explanation of Brausepulver


    Reference: http://www.apricot-records.de/news/releases.html
xxxlone
Canada
Local time: 15:01
Native speaker of: Danish
Grading comment
No. There is definitely an English word for it.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Andrzej Lejman: no reason to leave it in German
7 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: No. There is definitely an English word for it.

1059 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Sherbet drink(ing) powder


Explanation:
... because this is actually what it is - you can eat or drink it. See the following link:
http://www.answers.com/topic/sherbet

I know it's too late for points, but this is for reference for future askers.

I think the reason we can't find a popular term here is that - unless I'm mistaking - most other countries don't really drink in anymore. I've never come across it as a drink in the UK (see link again).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1059 days (2005-07-21 07:59:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Adding to what I just said and confirming the translation, here\'s a link:

http://www.cwlservices.com/Sherbet_drink_powder.htm

Sarah Downing
Local time: 15:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks Naranga!

Astrid
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