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Mensch Oma, was hast'n du?

English translation: Gee, grandma, are you alright?

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Mensch Oma, was hast'n du?
English translation:Gee, grandma, are you alright?
Entered by: Nicole Schnell
Options:
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05:58 Mar 17, 2008
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: Mensch Oma, was hast'n du?
Hello,

I was wondering what this German phrase means in English? It seems to be colloquial. Thank you for any help.

Sincerely,

Brian Costello

Seattle, Wa.
Brian Costello
Gee, grandma, are you alright?
Explanation:
"Was hast'n du?": A question asked when a person apparently doesn't feel well.
Selected response from:

Nicole Schnell
United States
Local time: 21:13
Grading comment
Special thanks to Nicole Schnell. I think her answer is the most accurate. However, my thanks also to the other people who answered: David Moore, Cristina Moldovan do Amaral and WilRoy for their brave attempts at answering it and for the time they took.

Sincrely,

Brian Costello


4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3Gee, grandma, are you alright?
Nicole Schnell
3Oh heck, grandma, what's up?David Moore
5 -4Damn, grandma, what's the matter with you?
Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
3 -2man gramdma, is something wrong?
Roy Williams


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -4
Damn, grandma, what's the matter with you?


Explanation:
one way to put it

Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
United States
Local time: 21:13
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  svenfrade: You beat me to it...
1 min
  -> thank you

disagree  Nicole Schnell: CL5 for translating "Mensch" with a swearword? Ouch. "Gee.." would have done a better job.
43 mins
  -> Gee, thanks :)

disagree  EdithK: with Nicole
59 mins
  -> Gee, thanks :)

disagree  franglish: Nicole says it
1 hr
  -> Gee, thanks :)

disagree  sylvie malich: I also don't like the negative and disrespectful "what's the matter with you".
3 hrs

neutral  Roy Williams: It may be harsh, but I find it funny
6 hrs

disagree  AllegroTrans: not the way to address a grandma
14 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Oh heck, grandma, what's up?


Explanation:
But a little more context would still help...

David Moore
Local time: 06:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lancashireman: I think the context is Little Red Riding Hood. Also, even 'heck' is a little strong for your granny.
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Mensch Oma, was hast\\\'n du?
man gramdma, is something wrong?


Explanation:
softer maybe

Roy Williams
Austria
Local time: 06:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lancashireman: Not many grannies would understand why you were addressing them as 'man'. // Putting in about as much thought as yourself. // As are we all.
12 mins
  -> In the US 'man' is common expression meaning wow! or Gee. Most US grannies would get it.//Just having a bit of fun

neutral  sylvie malich: how about just "Goodness, Granny, is there something wrong/something bothering you? as the case may be without more context...// you get my point though, right?
49 mins
  -> Only grannies say "Goodness" But I do get your point.

disagree  AllegroTrans: "man, grandma" ? ... NO, much too hip/slang
8 hrs
  -> Of course its slangy, the source text is dialect
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Gee, grandma, are you alright?


Explanation:
"Was hast'n du?": A question asked when a person apparently doesn't feel well.

Nicole Schnell
United States
Local time: 21:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Special thanks to Nicole Schnell. I think her answer is the most accurate. However, my thanks also to the other people who answered: David Moore, Cristina Moldovan do Amaral and WilRoy for their brave attempts at answering it and for the time they took.

Sincrely,

Brian Costello


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lancashireman: Most British ladies of this generation don’t like blatant Americanisms such as ‘gee’. 'Crikey' might be OK. However, I’m not sure about the etymology of this. It could be blasphemous (e.g. Christ’s something). // Oh, Seattle! In that case - 'agree'.
19 mins
  -> Well, the asker is located in Seattle, 145 miles / 230 km from Portland. "Gee!" is indeed derived from "Jesus!" and unfortunately very common.// Thank you, Andrew! (I like "crikey" a lot, BTW) :-)

neutral  Roy Williams: Gee, you guys are certianly putting a lot of thought into this
1 hr
  -> Yup.

agree  philippid
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, philippid!

agree  AllegroTrans
7 hrs
  -> Thank you, AllegroTrans!
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Changes made by editors
Mar 20, 2008 - Changes made by Nicole Schnell:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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