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bewegen

English translation: to persuade

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:bewegen
English translation:to persuade
Entered by: Helen Shiner
Options:
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13:30 Feb 15, 2009
German to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: bewegen
Mit diesem Schreibe möchte ich Sie dazu bewegen mich - auch ohne abgeschlossenes Studium - für die oben genannte Stelle in Betracht zu ziehen.

Application letter addressed to an American company. I've played around with several phrases (convince, motivate, make, etc.), but am not happy with any of them. Any suggestions?
silvia glatzhofer
Local time: 02:12
persuade
Explanation:
I think, without further context, that I would translate it this way. The person is asking for a chance and putting his/her case, presumably persuasively.

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Note added at 25 mins (2009-02-15 13:55:45 GMT)
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I would render the sentence: 'I am hoping to persuade you to...' If one were to use 'to convince' it would sound arrogant, as if the applicant knows better than the addressee, and 'to encourage' sounds as if the addressee is considered lazy or in need of a push to make the right decision. These are subtleties that are apparent to a native speaker, I'm afraid.

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Note added at 19 hrs (2009-02-16 09:07:51 GMT) Post-grading
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Thank you for the points, silvia
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:12
Grading comment
Danke, auch an alle anderen, v.a. Harald
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +8persuade
Helen Shiner
4 +2encourage
Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
4 +1'Convince' or 'Evidences' or 'proves' or 'demonstrates' ( '..my suitability for this position')
Dr Lofthouse
3 +1... please consider me for this position...
D-E Translator
Summary of reference entries provided
[to] move [someone to do something]
Derek Gill Franßen

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
encourage


Explanation:

...would be one option...

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Note added at 2 Min. (2009-02-15 13:33:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


...or <<<<< to persuade <<<<<<<

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 Min. (2009-02-15 13:33:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------



...or >>>>>>>>> to persuade >>>>>>>>>>>>

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 Min. (2009-02-15 13:34:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------



...or """"" to persuade """"""""

Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
Germany
Local time: 02:12
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Helen Shiner: I agree with persuade - your posting of that must have crossed with mine!/I have to disagree with 'convince' and 'encourage' for reasons given in response to Johanna.
5 mins
  -> Yes posting was crossing by approx. 3 minutes.../Acutally, I did not suggest convice for the same reason...

agree  Dr. Johanna Schmitt: "encourage" is a good option, and I think "convince" is also good
6 mins
  -> Danke, Johanna! "convinced" hört sich für mich etwas zu insistierend an...

disagree  Lancashireman: Would an employer feel flattered to receive ‘encouragement’ from a job applicant?
45 mins
  -> ...that is why I suggested "to persuade" still 3 minutes before Helen did... also strange that you disagree with "encourage" but not with "concern" which is completely wrong...

agree  Dr Lofthouse: Encourage is not a suitable word in this context - agree with Andrew
59 mins

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: ...with "[to] persuade." Almost didn't catch that one. ;-P
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
'Convince' or 'Evidences' or 'proves' or 'demonstrates' ( '..my suitability for this position')


Explanation:
eg '..I hope the CV attached to this letter convinces you of my suitability'

or
'I hope the information I have provided in this letter demonstrates my suitability for the vacancy'


Dr Lofthouse
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: evidences isn't English for starters /I'm not a 'certified' native Anglo-I'm a born native Anglo
1 min
  -> In the context used, writeaway, the phrase ' I hope this evidences that ...' is perfectly correct English...are you certified in English yourself?

neutral  Helen Shiner: Your suggestion re 'demonstrates' used in that way works fine if there is a need to rewrite the sentence, but agree with writeaway in relation to 'evidences'./I see no need for a complex rewrite - I also do not suggest verbatim translation, do I?
14 mins
  -> (Dr Lofthouse)..I think it would be wise to rewrite the entire sentence: there are several words you could use here, but each would require restructuring the sentence in which they appear: a 'verbatim' translation is not required in this case is it?

agree  mill2: I actually think rewriting the sentence in this way (first sentence with convince) makes a lot of sense. I think persuade is too strong (native english speaker)
4 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
... please consider me for this position...


Explanation:
I am of the opinion the job applicant need not translate word-for-word in this context, as he / she would like to be considered for the position / job as (I assume) he / she is a suitable candidate.

D-E Translator
Switzerland
Local time: 02:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: Very nice. And polite.
2 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
persuade


Explanation:
I think, without further context, that I would translate it this way. The person is asking for a chance and putting his/her case, presumably persuasively.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2009-02-15 13:55:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would render the sentence: 'I am hoping to persuade you to...' If one were to use 'to convince' it would sound arrogant, as if the applicant knows better than the addressee, and 'to encourage' sounds as if the addressee is considered lazy or in need of a push to make the right decision. These are subtleties that are apparent to a native speaker, I'm afraid.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2009-02-16 09:07:51 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you for the points, silvia

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Danke, auch an alle anderen, v.a. Harald

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Dr. Johanna Schmitt: Is not "convince" or "encourage" an option that sounds more posivite and convincing and not as "persuasive" :-)?//Okay, thank you very much for the explanation, Helen! Good to know - in German it is vice versa.
7 mins
  -> Johanna - you will have to take it from a native speaker that 'I am hoping to persuade you' sounds more polite than 'convince' which sounds bossy and 'encourage' which just does not sound EN in such circumstances. There's nothing negative in 'to persuade'

agree  Jo Bennett: Persuade is good.
25 mins
  -> Thank you, Jo

agree  franglish: 'I'm hoping to persuade you...'
26 mins
  -> Thank you, franglish

agree  Steve Thomasson: Agreed. Initially I thought of something like "I hope that you would still consider my application even though..." but that gives a reason to say no and 'persuade' is less verbose.
27 mins
  -> Thank you, Steve

agree  Paul Cohen: You've certainly persuaded me ;-)
39 mins
  -> Thank you, Paul

agree  Lancashireman: And also with your solution for 'möchte'.
44 mins
  -> Thank you, Andrew

agree  writeaway: one of the many cases where native speaker sensitivity to words is really needed. It's why I never take on work into another language. It's too essential for doing a good job.
1 hr
  -> Thank you, writeaway - I wouldn't expect to be able to do a sufficiently good job, so take the same view as you, particularly where it is not just a word-for-word technical document.

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: problem is the German "bewegen" sounds like "want to bring you to/make you", "persuade" is much nicer. / I would not use "bewegen". Too pushy. That's the first thing I thought when I saw the word.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Bernhard - Probably much easier to get away with being more forthright in German than in English; then we're probably helping the letter writer sound more polite than he/she naturally is!! And that is always a difficult one...

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: ;)
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Derek - and agree with your reference notes, too
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Reference comments


1 hr
Reference: [to] move [someone to do something]

Reference information:
move

(verb) [...] 5 take or cause to take action. [...] 7 provoke compassion, affection, or other feelings in. [...]

;)

Example sentence(s):
  • I will move you to anger by a foolish nation. -- Moses

    Reference: http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/move?view=uk
    Reference: http://net.bible.org/verse.php?book=Rom&chapter=10&verse=19
Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 32
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Voters for reclassification
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Non-PRO (1): Helen Shiner


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Changes made by editors
Feb 16, 2009 - Changes made by Helen Shiner:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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