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Rutschpartie

English translation: glissade

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Rutschpartie
English translation:glissade
Entered by: Charles Rothwell
Options:
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11:55 Feb 20, 2009
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: Rutschpartie
Greetings,

Please, what exactly does “Partie” mean in “Das war eine schöne Rutschpartie“.

I was just wondering if it could mean a move in ballet.

All the best,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:50
glissade
Explanation:
A gliding step in ballet.

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Note added at 46 mins (2009-02-20 12:42:04 GMT)
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http://dict.leo.org/ende?lp=ende&p=thMx..&search=glissade

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Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-20 12:44:31 GMT)
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(French: “sliding”), in ballet, a sliding step beginning and ending in the fifth position (feet turned out and pressed closely together, the heel of the right foot against the toe of the left, and vice versa). Used primarily as a preparation for jumps and leaps, the glissade begins when the dancer extends one leg along the floor to the front, side, or back from a fifth position with the knees slightly bent. He transfers his weight to the working leg and slides the other foot next to the first leg.



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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-20 14:38:07 GMT)
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I advanced the answer I did picking up on Simon's reference in the original question to 'ballet' (re. context).
Selected response from:

Charles Rothwell
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:50
Grading comment
many thanks very good indeed
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2glissade
Charles Rothwell
3 +1skidding/sliding tripfranglish
2 +1slipping and falling all over the place
Derek Gill Franßen
3the journey
Martin Wenzel


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Partie
the journey


Explanation:
was completed in a succession of skids

It is normally used when the streets freeze and people are having a hard time getting home safely...

Martin Wenzel
Germany
Local time: 01:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
skidding/sliding trip


Explanation:
'That was a great skidding trip' or ' That was a great game of skidding'

franglish
Switzerland
Local time: 01:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ingeborg Gowans: could be sledding, too so much depends on the context which we don't have, eh?
52 mins
  -> So right, Ingeborg! Meanwhile, we keep on guessing...
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Partie
glissade


Explanation:
A gliding step in ballet.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 46 mins (2009-02-20 12:42:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://dict.leo.org/ende?lp=ende&p=thMx..&search=glissade

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-20 12:44:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(French: “sliding”), in ballet, a sliding step beginning and ending in the fifth position (feet turned out and pressed closely together, the heel of the right foot against the toe of the left, and vice versa). Used primarily as a preparation for jumps and leaps, the glissade begins when the dancer extends one leg along the floor to the front, side, or back from a fifth position with the knees slightly bent. He transfers his weight to the working leg and slides the other foot next to the first leg.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-20 14:38:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I advanced the answer I did picking up on Simon's reference in the original question to 'ballet' (re. context).


    Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/glissade
Charles Rothwell
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
many thanks very good indeed

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Inge Meinzer
40 mins
  -> Thanks, Inge.

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Harald.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
eine schöne Rutschpartie
slipping and falling all over the place


Explanation:
Note that my suggestion is for "eine schöne Rutschpartie."

Perhaps it was meant ironically, like here: "Der Dienstag wird eine Rutschpartie – Warnung vor Schneeregen" (see http://www.tagesanzeiger.ch/panorama/vermischtes/Der-Diensta... ).

;)

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Note added at 3 hrs (2009-02-20 14:56:27 GMT)
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Oh, I just realized that my suggestion is, more or less, like Martin's--but I mean it even more figuratively (not necessarily in traffic).

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 01:50
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: Genau, ironisch wird es durch "schön"
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Johanna; I am missing the tell-tale "ganz," hence my low confidence level. ;-D
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Changes made by editors
Feb 22, 2009 - Changes made by Charles Rothwell:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Feb 20, 2009 - Changes made by Marcus Malabad:
Term askedPartie » Rutschpartie
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Field (specific)Other » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Field (write-in)Vocab Item » (none)


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