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Die 2000er

English translation: the 2000s

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Die 2000er
English translation:the 2000s
Entered by: Louise Mawbey
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13:14 Oct 27, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
History / 50th anniversary film
German term or phrase: Die 2000er
A company have produced a film to celebrate 50 years of a certain machine they produce. The subsections of the film are "Die 50er", "Die 60er" etc. until "Die 2000er".

I've called the others "The 1950s", "The 1960s" etc. but have no idea how to phrase the last one. "The 2000s" doesn't sound right to me.

TIA

Louise
Louise Mawbey
Germany
Local time: 07:08
the 2000s
Explanation:
In contrast to the decades from 1920 to 1999, which are called the twenties, the thirties and the like, the '00s have had no universally-accepted name. Some refer to the decade as the two thousands, but many find that usage awkward and incorrect for a number of reasons, most notably the fact that the many perceive the "two thousands" as pertaining to the 21st century. Written in numeral form, the decade can be written either as the "2000s" or as the "'00s", but looking for a name that has the same ease of use as the nineties or the fifties has been problematic, especially in the United States.

In the rest of the English-speaking world "The Noughties" and "The Noughts" have come to be the most widely recognized and accepted terms.[2] The term "Noughties" has been adopted by the BBC,[3] and while the term may not be universal, there is no other term so widely recognized. Probably the only reason that the term Noughties has not been completely accepted world wide is the fact that, in the United States (where usage of naught or nought to mean zero has never been ubiquitous), there is some confusion by those who assume erroneously that the term has something to do with the adjective naughty.

Other proposed names have been almost innumerable, and include, "the zeroes", the "aughts" (which gained some popularity in the early 20th century), "double-aughts", "aughties", "2K's", "uh-ohs", "zoogs", "ozies", and "abs". But these other suggestions usually represent the wishes of individuals, and do not generally represent any burgeoning consensus.[original research?]
Selected response from:

ntext
United States
Local time: 00:08
Grading comment
The link convinced me, thanks. I suppose it will seem strange until we all get used to it!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5the 2000sntext
3 +3The 2000s/ The New MilleniumJalapeno
3the 21st centuryxxxMaudarg
3the third millennium
Cilian O'Tuama
4 -2The Noughties
Ingo Dierkschnieder


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
The 2000s/ The New Millenium


Explanation:
If you don't like "the 2000s", which seems to be in use (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000s), perhaps you should try to move away from the format of the previous decade.

Jalapeno
Local time: 07:08
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxFrancis Lee: The new millennium - yes, 2 "n"s, but no big deal ;-)
18 mins
  -> Thanks, Francis. Typos can happen ... :-)

agree  Dr. Georg Schweigart
50 mins

neutral  Steffen Walter: millen*n*ium
2 hrs
  -> You're right, of course. Just a typo ...

agree  Darin Fitzpatrick: Agreeing with the first entry - but I don't like "new millennium" because the original is "2000er." Stick close to the original unless it just doesn't work.
5 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the 2000s


Explanation:
In contrast to the decades from 1920 to 1999, which are called the twenties, the thirties and the like, the '00s have had no universally-accepted name. Some refer to the decade as the two thousands, but many find that usage awkward and incorrect for a number of reasons, most notably the fact that the many perceive the "two thousands" as pertaining to the 21st century. Written in numeral form, the decade can be written either as the "2000s" or as the "'00s", but looking for a name that has the same ease of use as the nineties or the fifties has been problematic, especially in the United States.

In the rest of the English-speaking world "The Noughties" and "The Noughts" have come to be the most widely recognized and accepted terms.[2] The term "Noughties" has been adopted by the BBC,[3] and while the term may not be universal, there is no other term so widely recognized. Probably the only reason that the term Noughties has not been completely accepted world wide is the fact that, in the United States (where usage of naught or nought to mean zero has never been ubiquitous), there is some confusion by those who assume erroneously that the term has something to do with the adjective naughty.

Other proposed names have been almost innumerable, and include, "the zeroes", the "aughts" (which gained some popularity in the early 20th century), "double-aughts", "aughties", "2K's", "uh-ohs", "zoogs", "ozies", and "abs". But these other suggestions usually represent the wishes of individuals, and do not generally represent any burgeoning consensus.[original research?]


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000s
ntext
United States
Local time: 00:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 55
Grading comment
The link convinced me, thanks. I suppose it will seem strange until we all get used to it!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore: I find nothing wrong with the 2000s
17 mins

agree  Nicole Martin
27 mins

agree  Dr. Georg Schweigart
50 mins

agree  BrigitteHilgner: It may still look a bit strange - but we'd better start getting used to it.
53 mins

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: not as strange as millenium with one N ;-)
1 hr

neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: References hin oder her, I don't like it; if you look at the context, "the new milenNium" is preferable
2 hrs

neutral  Darin Fitzpatrick: Exactly as strange as "2000er". "New Millennium" implies a break from the past that is NOT implied in the original.
5 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the third millennium


Explanation:
?

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 07:08
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the 21st century


Explanation:
How about this variation on the theme?

xxxMaudarg
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
The Noughties


Explanation:
I personally would go for "The Noughties" and change the other terms to "The Fifties", "The Sixties" and so on.

Ingo Dierkschnieder
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ken Cox: besides the obvous pun on 'naughty', it won't fly in the US at all.
15 mins

disagree  Nicole Martin: Whether the pun is intentional or not, I don't think it belongs at all. Besides, as Ken pointed out, it wouldn't work on the US anyway. I've never heard anyone say "naught" except in unusual circumstances such as literature or old-fashioned speech.
22 mins

neutral  David Moore: Sorry, but since the 1970s and the BBC started employing newsreaders no-one can understand, I'm not impressed by any of their ideas...and this one erst recht nicht...
36 mins

disagree  Darin Fitzpatrick: Definitely nought, er, not. (For any non-BBC audience.)
5 hrs
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