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Häuptling

English translation: chieftain/warlord

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Häuptling
English translation:chieftain/warlord
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
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21:48 Mar 11, 2002
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - History / History
German term or phrase: Häuptling
In historical context: Aurich war schon ganz früh Häuptlingsresidenz (es gab tatsächlich eine Häuptlingszeit, zwischen 1350 und 1464, als sich die örtlichen Machthaber aus den alten Bauerngeschlechtern Häuptlinge nannten), später Fürstensitz. I know that it can be translated as chief or chieftan or headman, but I am not sure which one really applies to the period from 1350 to 1464.
Kai
chieftain/war lord
Explanation:
I'd go with chieftan because that's also what the Scots called their leaders in those days.
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9chieftain/war lord
Kim Metzger
4 +1chieftanKlaus Dorn


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
chieftain/war lord


Explanation:
I'd go with chieftan because that's also what the Scots called their leaders in those days.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 200
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Hardie: yes, definitely chieftain in Scotland:)
3 mins

agree  Steven Sidore
54 mins

agree  ingot
1 hr

agree  Agnieszka Hayward: chieftain....and no other :o)
1 hr

agree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke
1 hr

agree  xxxgenaa
2 hrs

agree  Kathi Stock
6 hrs

agree  Geri Linda Metterle
7 hrs

agree  Bob Kerns
10 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
chieftan


Explanation:
As far as I know, chief is really only used for the red indians (I know, there's gonna be a lot of translator colleagues trying to beat me up in a mo....).

But there are Chieftans in German history, I definitely know that much.

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Note added at 2002-03-11 21:54:31 (GMT)
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yes, and I spelt it wrong too...Chieftain

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Uschi (Ursula) Walke: I'm not sure that your original spelling was wrong. There are too many references to Norman times, they can't all be misspellings. The origin seems to be 'capitaneus'.'. , later changed to capTAIN. No need to beat you up! :o)
2 hrs

agree  Uli Marggraf: Collins English Dict & Thesaurus 1999 gives only chieftain!
1 day11 hrs
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