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Jungvolk

English translation: young people (Hitler Youth)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Jungvolk
English translation:young people (Hitler Youth)
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:59 Apr 11, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History
German term or phrase: Jungvolk
Definition for the word Jungvolk. Translate from German to English.
Elsa Pazos
young people (Hitler Youth)
Explanation:
The term was used during the Nazi period in Germany. It's no longer commonly used. You could also translate it as young folk. It was a suborganization of the Hitlerjugend (Hitler Youth) and referred to young boys from 10 to 14 years old.
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 19:18
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +14young people (Hitler Youth)
Kim Metzger
4 +2"Jung folks/Youngsters"
Сергей Лузан
4young bee population
Caro Giese
4young people
SwissTell
4the young
jccantrell
4 -2youth of today
jerrie


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
"Jung folks/Youngsters"


Explanation:
From my own expereience. Context required.
Good luck

Сергей Лузан
Russian Federation
Local time: 04:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxbrute: Youngsters!
7 mins
  -> Dank aus Russland

agree  GBChrista
1 hr
  -> Dank aus Russland
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
young people (Hitler Youth)


Explanation:
The term was used during the Nazi period in Germany. It's no longer commonly used. You could also translate it as young folk. It was a suborganization of the Hitlerjugend (Hitler Youth) and referred to young boys from 10 to 14 years old.


    Langenscheidt Muret-Sanders
    Wahrig
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 19:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 192
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alev Ellington
1 min

agree  pschmitt
2 mins

agree  xxxbrute
6 mins

neutral  Karin Walker: Correct definition, but I wouldn't translate it - that would mean that the term could no longer be placed in that context.
6 mins
  -> The asker wants a definition. He didn't ask whether it should be translated.

agree  Endre Both: Good explanation. However, apparently it's still used by some :( www.rfj-stmk.at/jungvolk.htm
11 mins
  -> I simply said it's no longer commonly used.

agree  Elvira Stoianov
1 hr

agree  conny: absolutely, it shouldn't be translated but explained in brackets if needed
1 hr

agree  Klaus Herrmann: Good explanation - Also fully agree to the term not being commonly used.
1 hr

agree  ingot
1 hr

agree  Steven Sidore: I agree that this is the likely explanation, but the term still pops up elsewehere. Look at this Austrian website: http://www.rfj-stmk.at/jungvolk.htm
2 hrs

agree  Palmyra
2 hrs

agree  Gerhard Hofmann: I would not translate it either
10 hrs

agree  DPS
21 hrs

agree  Dr.G.MD: I wouldn't translate it
1 day1 hr

agree  Abdul Mukhid
2 days1 hr
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
young people


Explanation:
or: young generations or younger generation. More of context needed.

SwissTell
Local time: 20:18
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 12
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the young


Explanation:
"Youth is wasted on the young."

I am old enough now to understand this!

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 17:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
youth of today


Explanation:
if the context is modern

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  conny: not of today, but of the time of the Nazise, as Kim expplained
7 mins

disagree  Klaus Herrmann: Certainly not.
37 mins

agree  Caro Giese: Why not? As there is no context given, it might be in a modern context with no Nazi connotation at all.
1 hr

disagree  pschmitt: "Jungvolk" can't escape being associated with Nazi ideology. Hence it would be plain ignorant to translate it as "youth of today"
18 hrs
  -> Please excuse any ignorance/mental aberration on grounds of natural exuberance and enthusiasm of only discovering this web-site on Tuesday.
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
young bee population


Explanation:
apparently, Jungvolk is also a term for a young bee population. However, I don't know the English term in this context. Maybe someone else does.

Also, while most Google hits do refer to the Nazi youth organisation, you can also find a couple where the word is used meaning simply young people. I have heard it used in this sense too, so I suppose the Nazi connotation is slowly diminishing.

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Note added at 2002-04-13 10:11:28 (GMT)
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Meanwhile, I have asked some friends (around 30 years of age) how they understand the word, and they didn\'t think of Nazis either. Just young people, possibly a little derogative.

Caro Giese
Local time: 02:18
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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