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Kur

English translation: health spa holiday

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Kur
English translation:health spa holiday
Entered by: xxxPoveyTrans
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06:50 Jul 4, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources
German term or phrase: Kur
Im Anschluss an eine Kur oder für die Arbeitsplatzsuche muss der Arbeitgeber den Urlaubsansprüchen entsprechen.

This is from an employers' manual under the section on holiday entitlement.
xxxPoveyTrans
Local time: 05:28
health spa holiday
Explanation:
Considering that this falls under the "holiday entitlement" section, why not call it a "health spa holiday"? Health spa holidays are relaxing breaks that also include a certain amount of treatment.

This is for those of you who are looking for a ***health spa holiday*** which includes a medical examination and supervision, therapy, treatments for a variety of illnesses, rehabilitation, weight loss, addiction - or simply complete relaxation to unwind from the day to day rat race.
http://www.poland4all.com/subject.cfm?id=11&category=9

Thermal spas mean not only therapy but also a moment to let go and take care of oneself and when you start your ***health spa holiday*** you are starting your trip to a healthy and relaxing break which rejuvenates mind and body.
http://www.comunecervia.it/turismo/docs/docs.asp?doc=terme-s...





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2007-07-04 21:34:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Perhaps my "health spa holiday" interpretation stems from the many years in Germany where I (rather enviously, I admit) heard people brag about being sent for weeks on a "Kur" to (force them? allow them?) to take a break from work (and lose some weight, cut back on their smoking, etc.). While they were there, many of them picked up a "Kurschatten" - a quick little (extra-marital?) fling to go along with all the other "treatments".

The German "Kur" has become an accepted part of the post-war social welfare system. Germans have a "spa entitlement" that allows them to go to a spa (on a doctor's orders - and paid for by the health insurance company) on a regular basis. This excerpt from at 1996 New York Times article says a lot about "Kurkultur":

"Outside the clinic where Mr. Ruhs, a 55-year-old technician in a food factory, is about to be unpeeled and hosed down by Theresia Doppelgatz, the nurse who wrapped him in the mud known as fango, Hedwig Wilming is taking a smoking break from her therapy, and she seems to agree.

"Mornings it's fango, evenings tango," said Mrs. Wilming, a 50-year-old nurse, getting a laugh from other people who, like her, wear bathrobes and track suits to undertake the travails of a four-week, state-financed spa treatment, known as a "health cure," that has come to stand in microcosm for one of the most ferocious debates in Germany as it gropes toward unfamiliar austerity.

The question, in essence, is this: can Germany's welfare state continue to afford not just routine health care but also a system whereby, on a doctor's prescription, Germans like Mr. Ruhs and Mrs. Wilming may take a free four-week spa treatment every three years?

In Bonn, just north of here, the Government's answer is no. And, among measures supposed to save some $33 billion in public spending, it has proposed that spa entitlements be reduced to three weeks every four years. The German Government reckons that by trimming spa care and some other smaller benefits, it will save about $5 billion a year.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=9B...

Okay, I concede that the word "holiday" does not fit all "Kur" situations. Sometimes a "Kur" is hard work - especially following an operation. It's no picknick recovering from major back surgery, etc. But, in my opinion, the word "treatment" - although it's used in the above-cited article - somehow sounds too OFFICIALLY MEDICAL for many (but, admittedly, not all) of these state-sponsored wellness junkets.

Given the rampant abuse of the "Kur" system in the past, perhaps "a doctor's prescribed stay at a health spa" would be more appropriate?

Sorry, Simon, I know you only wanted a short translation of a three-letter German word! Who was the translator that said the English is always shorter than the German!??
Selected response from:

Paul Cohen
Greenland
Local time: 02:28
Grading comment
Thanks Paul. I understand all the comments and found both options useful but Paul's long explanation was very useful in highlighting differences in work practices. Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2treatment at a health resort
Nicole Schnell
3health spa holiday
Paul Cohen


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
treatment at a health resort


Explanation:
My suggestion.

Nicole Schnell
United States
Local time: 21:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 47
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Paul. I understand all the comments and found both options useful but Paul's long explanation was very useful in highlighting differences in work practices.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SusieZ: yes, that's how I've translated it...
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Susie! It is indeed something that requires a doctor's prescription and is paid by the health insurance co. Thanks for the confirmation!

agree  Craig Meulen
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Craig!

neutral  Paul Cohen: Technically, I'm sure "treatment at a health resort" or "treatment at a health spa" is not incorrect, Nicole. If you check out the "novel" that I've added to my answer, you'll see where my reticence comes from concerning the word "treatment". ;-))
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
health spa holiday


Explanation:
Considering that this falls under the "holiday entitlement" section, why not call it a "health spa holiday"? Health spa holidays are relaxing breaks that also include a certain amount of treatment.

This is for those of you who are looking for a ***health spa holiday*** which includes a medical examination and supervision, therapy, treatments for a variety of illnesses, rehabilitation, weight loss, addiction - or simply complete relaxation to unwind from the day to day rat race.
http://www.poland4all.com/subject.cfm?id=11&category=9

Thermal spas mean not only therapy but also a moment to let go and take care of oneself and when you start your ***health spa holiday*** you are starting your trip to a healthy and relaxing break which rejuvenates mind and body.
http://www.comunecervia.it/turismo/docs/docs.asp?doc=terme-s...





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2007-07-04 21:34:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Perhaps my "health spa holiday" interpretation stems from the many years in Germany where I (rather enviously, I admit) heard people brag about being sent for weeks on a "Kur" to (force them? allow them?) to take a break from work (and lose some weight, cut back on their smoking, etc.). While they were there, many of them picked up a "Kurschatten" - a quick little (extra-marital?) fling to go along with all the other "treatments".

The German "Kur" has become an accepted part of the post-war social welfare system. Germans have a "spa entitlement" that allows them to go to a spa (on a doctor's orders - and paid for by the health insurance company) on a regular basis. This excerpt from at 1996 New York Times article says a lot about "Kurkultur":

"Outside the clinic where Mr. Ruhs, a 55-year-old technician in a food factory, is about to be unpeeled and hosed down by Theresia Doppelgatz, the nurse who wrapped him in the mud known as fango, Hedwig Wilming is taking a smoking break from her therapy, and she seems to agree.

"Mornings it's fango, evenings tango," said Mrs. Wilming, a 50-year-old nurse, getting a laugh from other people who, like her, wear bathrobes and track suits to undertake the travails of a four-week, state-financed spa treatment, known as a "health cure," that has come to stand in microcosm for one of the most ferocious debates in Germany as it gropes toward unfamiliar austerity.

The question, in essence, is this: can Germany's welfare state continue to afford not just routine health care but also a system whereby, on a doctor's prescription, Germans like Mr. Ruhs and Mrs. Wilming may take a free four-week spa treatment every three years?

In Bonn, just north of here, the Government's answer is no. And, among measures supposed to save some $33 billion in public spending, it has proposed that spa entitlements be reduced to three weeks every four years. The German Government reckons that by trimming spa care and some other smaller benefits, it will save about $5 billion a year.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=9B...

Okay, I concede that the word "holiday" does not fit all "Kur" situations. Sometimes a "Kur" is hard work - especially following an operation. It's no picknick recovering from major back surgery, etc. But, in my opinion, the word "treatment" - although it's used in the above-cited article - somehow sounds too OFFICIALLY MEDICAL for many (but, admittedly, not all) of these state-sponsored wellness junkets.

Given the rampant abuse of the "Kur" system in the past, perhaps "a doctor's prescribed stay at a health spa" would be more appropriate?

Sorry, Simon, I know you only wanted a short translation of a three-letter German word! Who was the translator that said the English is always shorter than the German!??

Paul Cohen
Greenland
Local time: 02:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 55
Grading comment
Thanks Paul. I understand all the comments and found both options useful but Paul's long explanation was very useful in highlighting differences in work practices. Many thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nicole Schnell: I'd love to agree, Paul, but this is indeed a medical thing, paid for by the health insurance co.
24 mins
  -> I agree that it's a medical thing, Nicole. That's why I've cited references with therapy and treatments for various ailments. But it's more than that. As we know, a "Kur" is also also commonly used for relaxing and "socializing"...

neutral  Craig Meulen: In this context it is not a "holiday". "residential treatment" or something would be better.
9 hrs
  -> Hmmm. "residential treatment" sounds to me like a massage therapist visits your home.
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