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Nach der Arbeit sollst du ruhen oder 1000 Schritte tun.

English translation: Had a hard day at work? Step out of it!

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09:11 Apr 3, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
German term or phrase: Nach der Arbeit sollst du ruhen oder 1000 Schritte tun.
“Nach der Arbeit sollst du ruhen oder 1000 Schritte tun.“ Nehmen sie es wörtlich und erfreuen Sie sich an unseren Trekkingschuhen mit Membran in den Größen 36 – 47,
also auch für Damen!
njbeckett
Germany
Local time: 12:25
English translation:Had a hard day at work? Step out of it!
Explanation:
As this seems to be an advertisment, an idiom from the target culture might be more effective.
Selected response from:

Melanie Wittwer
New Zealand
Local time: 22:25
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6When work is over, rest a while. Alternatively, walk a mileLancashireman
3 +8Had a hard day at work? Step out of it!
Melanie Wittwer
4Rest after work or walk 1000 steps (?)
Chinmayi Sripada
5 -2After work you shall rest or walk a 1000 steps.Wilhelm Deutsch
2your work is done, now hit the sack, or better yet, go on a trek. (not nec. for pts.)
Bernhard Sulzer


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
After work you shall rest or walk a 1000 steps.


Explanation:
Direkte Uebersetzung soll gut sein,
W.D.

Wilhelm Deutsch
Local time: 05:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Armorel Young: That's a remarkably high confidence level for completely wrong use of a) shall and b) a 1000
17 mins

disagree  Ulrike Kraemer: with Armorel
27 mins

disagree  xxxFrancis Lee: What is this supposed to mean to English-speakers?
57 mins

agree  Lancashireman: But to strike the right biblical tone: "Thou shalt rest or walk a thousand paces after thy labours."
1 hr
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Rest after work or walk 1000 steps (?)


Explanation:
Read something to this effect on this link
http://10000steps.org.au/downloads/tisfortenthousandsteps.pd...

But I agree with Littlebalu and Mr Deutsch

Chinmayi Sripada
Local time: 15:55
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ulrike Kraemer: I'm sure the asker wouldn't have posted this question here if he/she wanted a literal translation. Any dictionary could have provided that.
27 mins

neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: Ditto. Doesn't work in English
53 mins
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
Had a hard day at work? Step out of it!


Explanation:
As this seems to be an advertisment, an idiom from the target culture might be more effective.

Melanie Wittwer
New Zealand
Local time: 22:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ulrike Kraemer: good "workaround" ;-)
21 mins
  -> Thanks LittleBalu.

agree  Richard Benham: Or is that a "walkaround"?
31 mins
  -> A step in the right direction. Puns galore! Thanks Richard.

agree  Armorel Young: Excellent suggestion - any literal translation just sounds peculiar to Eng. ears, unless prefaced with "as the saying goes ...", which makes it far too wordy
39 mins
  -> Thanks Armorel.

agree  Jim Tucker: this is good - especially when the original is so lousy!
58 mins
  -> Thanks Jim.

agree  Ken Cox: or 'there's nothing like a good walk after a hard day at work' -- but your suggestion has more punch\\@ Brendan: 'walk it off' sounds like a hangover cure.
59 mins
  -> Thanks Ken.

agree  casper: A perfect fit!
1 hr
  -> So much praise. Thanks guys.

agree  Brendan Bleheen: Nice idea - but how about "walk it off" instead of "step out of it"?
1 hr

agree  Ingeborg Gowans: well done, Melanie
11 hrs

neutral  Lancashireman: Sorry to be a wet blanket but what was the ‘target culture’ here? I don’t recognise ‘step out of it’. Is that a Maori saying? Anyway, congrats. The asker normally grades himself but will no doubt have had good reasons for leaving this one to the robot.
17 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
When work is over, rest a while. Alternatively, walk a mile


Explanation:
I am not sure that the other suggestions take into account the fact that the original is a rhyming couplet:

Nach der Arbeit sollst du ruhen
Oder tausend Schritte tun

When work is over, rest a while.
Alternatively, walk a mile

(‘mile’: from Latin ‘mille passum’ = ‘a thousand paces’)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-04-03 11:44:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

CL should have been 4 (faulty mouse control). Although 'alternatively fits the meter, it looks and sounds slightly out of place.
Also, please add full stop at the end. Thanks.
AJS

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-04-03 12:22:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

P.S. To avoid bumping into too many 'men in the street' whilst out on your stroll you should seek out some 'wooded moorland'.
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1749588

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-04-03 13:54:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When work is over, rest a while.
Or even better, walk a mile

Thanks to Chetan and Killian (see below)

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 136

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Stefanie Egenhofer
1 hr

agree  casper: 'Or better still, walk a mile'. How do you like the alternative to 'alternatively'?
1 hr
  -> Yes. This (almost) fits the meter and can be taken more seriously. Thanks, Chetan.

agree  Killian Kavanagh: For the purposes of the meter and adapted from Chetan's, "Or even better, walk a mile"? I definitely agree with Andrew's sentiments on the rhyming couplet.
2 hrs
  -> Super suggestion. Fits the meter perfectly. Thanks.

agree  Rebecca Garber: 'Or even better' is better than alternatively. Nice meter and rhyme.
2 hrs

agree  Armorel Young: It's very good.
3 hrs

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: ..trek a mile. ...placet! (my Latin is not very strong.) PS: I like the biblical version especially.
10 hrs
  -> Ad astra!
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
your work is done, now hit the sack, or better yet, go on a trek. (not nec. for pts.)


Explanation:
or:

your work is done, now go relax,
or better yet, go on some treks.

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 06:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36
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Changes made by editors
Apr 3, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Marketing


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