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es in sich haben

English translation: could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimated

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:haben es in sich
English translation:could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimated
Entered by: Steffen Walter
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:33 Jul 8, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
German term or phrase: es in sich haben
Auf Freitag kommt eine Wetterfront rein, die es in sich hat.

Von einer Wettervorhersage
Schweizerdeutsch -> Britisch-Englisch...
Katy62
Local time: 06:45
could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimated
Explanation:
I completely agree with David M. re. the previous Kudoz question. There are a myriad of ways of translating "hat es in sich"!
The above are merely two of probably a hundred or so.

And there are no doubt a good couple of dozen options re. a weather front that:
- should not be treated lightly
- has the potential ...
- could make the news
- could leave its mark / seems to want to make its mark
- could wreak its own minor havoc (je nachdem)

... any many, many, more (better) options - depending on the CONTEXT!
Jonathan's suggestion (of the understated kind) might also work!

It all depends on the context. Is this for an actual weather report or from the script for a horror film? Think: ARD-Wetterfrosch. Then think: The Fog! Then think: what kind of weather do they mean?
Previous/subsequent sentences?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 19:58:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And besides: "carry/pack a punch" might be a tad premature, because the German is probably talking about a forecast (whatever the precise context), i.e. the POTENTIAL effects. ;-)

- a dodgy/ominous/menacing/daunting/evil-looking weather front
- a weather front that could well pull out (all) the stops

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 20:04:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On the more ambiguous front (sorry!):
- a potentially intense/severe weather front

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 20:08:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OTT options:

- that has to be seen to be believed
- that you wouldn't want to mess with
- that if it didn't exist, you'd have to invent it
- that might not be taking any prisoners
- that asks questions later

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs (2007-07-09 13:42:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the Agrees. My right to respond directly to them has sadly been withdrawn. Feel free to add your own ideas, though!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day2 hrs (2007-07-09 19:31:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Can we have some feedback/context (!) from the Asker, please? ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day3 hrs (2007-07-09 20:25:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, that's still not what I mean by "context"!
Why are you translating a weather forecast - which is presumably no longer "aktuell"?? What is the porpoise of the translation?

And although "hat es in sich" is not very formal, IMO "packs a punch" is the wrong register.

These alternatives spring to mind as something a UK weather forecaster might typically say:

- the weather's got some nasty surprises in store
http://www.pinellascounty.org/articles/Todd0901BLB.html
- there's a storm brewing
- Tumultuous weather conditions await us

or ...
- There'll be no silver lining on these clouds
- Havoc beckons ...
- There may be trouble ahead ... (sing along!)
- it's time to pack your buckets and spades away ...
- "take an umbrella with you tomorrow"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMAt8ZXqtbc
UNMISSABLE! ;-)

At the end of the day, German/Swiss and English-speaking weather forecasts are worlds apart (even if the weather is often similar).
Selected response from:

xxxFrancis Lee
Local time: 06:45
Grading comment
It was very difficult to grade this. Thanks to all. In this particular context I went for this answer.
BTW: I did not withdraw any rights. "It wasn't me..."
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3which packs a punch
swisstell
3 +4could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimatedxxxFrancis Lee
5 +1Please close this question without gradinghirselina
4a vicious weather front
Renate FitzRoy


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
in sich haben
which packs a punch


Explanation:
:-)

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 06:45
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 6

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bernhard Sulzer: that packs a punch: http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20060114-1438-rain.... // for conversational style, a storm "that" packs a punch sounds ok to me. But hey, maybe I am rrong?!
49 mins

agree  David Moore: Agree with Bernhard - bis auf das "that" - wot is RONG - "which" is correct here if only by usage, and by sound.
1 hr

agree  Stephen Sadie: absolutely with david
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
in sich haben
Please close this question without grading


Explanation:
The question has already been asked, Trudy Peters won the points with "carry a punch". For other possibilities, see:
http://fra.proz.com/kudoz/453125



hirselina
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway
5 mins

agree  Kim Metzger
8 mins

agree  Nicole Schnell
31 mins

disagree  David Moore: I'm not sure that this is a fair answer; after all, there ARE other possibilities - and I'm not sure that the correct answer was chosen last time either. Or that any of those then submitted was as good as the answer above.
44 mins

neutral  Richard Benham: I don't know what if anything the rules say, but I think if a question has been asked before, the asker should at least explain why it is being asked again. And it would help to include the whole term in the question: "es" is the object of "haben".
51 mins

disagree  Lancashireman: Different context
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
in sich haben
a vicious weather front


Explanation:
I think this would catch the picture. Never mind how you would translate "es in sich haben" in another context!

Renate FitzRoy
Local time: 05:45
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
in sich haben
could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimated


Explanation:
I completely agree with David M. re. the previous Kudoz question. There are a myriad of ways of translating "hat es in sich"!
The above are merely two of probably a hundred or so.

And there are no doubt a good couple of dozen options re. a weather front that:
- should not be treated lightly
- has the potential ...
- could make the news
- could leave its mark / seems to want to make its mark
- could wreak its own minor havoc (je nachdem)

... any many, many, more (better) options - depending on the CONTEXT!
Jonathan's suggestion (of the understated kind) might also work!

It all depends on the context. Is this for an actual weather report or from the script for a horror film? Think: ARD-Wetterfrosch. Then think: The Fog! Then think: what kind of weather do they mean?
Previous/subsequent sentences?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 19:58:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And besides: "carry/pack a punch" might be a tad premature, because the German is probably talking about a forecast (whatever the precise context), i.e. the POTENTIAL effects. ;-)

- a dodgy/ominous/menacing/daunting/evil-looking weather front
- a weather front that could well pull out (all) the stops

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 20:04:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On the more ambiguous front (sorry!):
- a potentially intense/severe weather front

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-07-08 20:08:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OTT options:

- that has to be seen to be believed
- that you wouldn't want to mess with
- that if it didn't exist, you'd have to invent it
- that might not be taking any prisoners
- that asks questions later

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs (2007-07-09 13:42:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the Agrees. My right to respond directly to them has sadly been withdrawn. Feel free to add your own ideas, though!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day2 hrs (2007-07-09 19:31:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Can we have some feedback/context (!) from the Asker, please? ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day3 hrs (2007-07-09 20:25:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, that's still not what I mean by "context"!
Why are you translating a weather forecast - which is presumably no longer "aktuell"?? What is the porpoise of the translation?

And although "hat es in sich" is not very formal, IMO "packs a punch" is the wrong register.

These alternatives spring to mind as something a UK weather forecaster might typically say:

- the weather's got some nasty surprises in store
http://www.pinellascounty.org/articles/Todd0901BLB.html
- there's a storm brewing
- Tumultuous weather conditions await us

or ...
- There'll be no silver lining on these clouds
- Havoc beckons ...
- There may be trouble ahead ... (sing along!)
- it's time to pack your buckets and spades away ...
- "take an umbrella with you tomorrow"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMAt8ZXqtbc
UNMISSABLE! ;-)

At the end of the day, German/Swiss and English-speaking weather forecasts are worlds apart (even if the weather is often similar).

xxxFrancis Lee
Local time: 06:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 54
Grading comment
It was very difficult to grade this. Thanks to all. In this particular context I went for this answer.
BTW: I did not withdraw any rights. "It wasn't me..."

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bernhard Sulzer
1 hr

agree  Lancashireman: Agree with your comment on the 'register'. Can't agree with the TM addicts here. Sorry to read that your right of reply has been withdrawn. Would that be a consequence of questioning the (oxymoronic) omniscience and wisdom of the asker?
14 hrs

agree  Rebecca Garber: great list of possibilities!
17 hrs

agree  Kim Metzger
23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Jul 16, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/36071">Katy62's</a> old entry - "es in sich haben" » "could cause a commotion/ should not be underestimated"
Jul 9, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Term askedin sich haben » es in sich haben
Field (specific)General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
Jul 8, 2007 - Changes made by Klaus Herrmann:
Language pairEnglish to German » German to English
Jul 8, 2007 - Changes made by Klaus Herrmann:
Language pairGerman to English » English to German


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