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Hinterposemuckel

English translation: the back of beyond; in the sticks, Timbuktu

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17:08 Apr 26, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
German term or phrase: Hinterposemuckel
This could be a fun one, I hope. I have a sense "Hinterposemuckel" means something like the Australianism "back of Bourke [a town at the edge of the Outback]" -- a name for a remote place where nothing much happens. Am I right? I can't really think of an equivalent term in English other than that Australian-only "back of Bourke", except for the vulgarism "bumf*** nowhere" (which could be US-only, and at any rate is not fit for general-market translation). Any suggestions? Do I have the general meaning of "Hinterposemuckel" right? Thanks! Here's some context:

"In Deutschland musst Du von der Entstehung der Erde an alles wissen und Latein können. Sonst zählst Du als ungebildet. Aktuelles Allgemeinwissen ist dabei weniger gefragt. Du musst aber wissen, wie der letzte Nebenfluss von Hinterposemuckel heißt, wie lang der ist und wo er entspringt sowie mündet."
BrettMN
Local time: 00:57
English translation:the back of beyond; in the sticks, Timbuktu
Explanation:
Here are three BE expressions, all of which are fairly common in this sort of context. I do realise they are not likely to fit your context, because of where you are based, but at least I'm thinking ...
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 07:57
Grading comment
I'm choosing this answer because I think any of these would fit, and one of them is indeed a placename (as Hinterposemuckel) is. All would work in AmE, even though "Hicksville" might be slightly more familiar to Americans (except it almost always refers to a particular type of American locale, where the context of the example sentence I gave has the patina of someplace foreign, like Timbuktu). Thanks, all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4in the middle of nowhere
Hildegard Klein-Bodenheimer
3 +3the back of beyond; in the sticks, TimbuktuDavid Moore
3 +1Timbuckthree
Bernhard Sulzer
3 +1beyond the black stump
EdithK
4Hicksville
Melanie Nassar
3in the pittsUlrike Möller


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
in the pitts


Explanation:
Hello Brett, you are absolutely right. I know the above is said when s.o. lives in the middle of nowhere, maybe it fits here, too?

Ulrike Möller
Germany
Local time: 07:57
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
in the middle of nowhere


Explanation:
might work for you

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Note added at 18 mins (2008-04-26 17:27:06 GMT)
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I just remembered what they say in Upstate New York:
*In the boonies*
LEO even knows it as "In der Pampa"

Hildegard Klein-Bodenheimer
Germany
Local time: 07:57
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sabine Winter: Agree but I think "in the boonies" is even better!
34 mins

agree  Ingeborg Gowans: or: in the boon docks
1 hr

agree  Ingrid Moore
1 hr

agree  kriddl: I also like "in the boonies" :-)
1 day1 hr
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
beyond the black stump


Explanation:
Aussie speech but I have learned that in the UK

Beyond the Black Stump » ABC Queensland » Heritage- Beyond the black stump is a favourite old Aussie saying.
www.abc.net.au/queensland/heritage/stories/s680695.htm

Or Irish

in the bogs


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Note added at 15 mins (2008-04-26 17:23:41 GMT)
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East of nowhere ... just thought of that but still no town name

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Note added at 25 mins (2008-04-26 17:34:10 GMT)
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just thought of that one

in/at the back of beyond and checked it on google ....

Definition of at/in the back of beyond in the Idioms Dictionary. at/in the back of beyond phrase. What does at/in the back of beyond expression mean?
idioms.thefreedictionary.com/at%2Fin+the+back+of+beyond -


EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 07:57
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Ward: in the back of beyond
3 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Hicksville


Explanation:
This is what we used to call some town in the middle of nowhere.

But there actually is a town called Hicksville somewhere, I think.

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Note added at 14 hrs (2008-04-27 07:41:11 GMT)
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or Podunk, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podunk

Melanie Nassar
United States
Local time: 08:57
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is really right. I'm surprised I hadn't thought of it.

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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the back of beyond; in the sticks, Timbuktu


Explanation:
Here are three BE expressions, all of which are fairly common in this sort of context. I do realise they are not likely to fit your context, because of where you are based, but at least I'm thinking ...

David Moore
Local time: 07:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
I'm choosing this answer because I think any of these would fit, and one of them is indeed a placename (as Hinterposemuckel) is. All would work in AmE, even though "Hicksville" might be slightly more familiar to Americans (except it almost always refers to a particular type of American locale, where the context of the example sentence I gave has the patina of someplace foreign, like Timbuktu). Thanks, all!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, David. All those are AmE, too, actually (well, the first not so much, but it would be understood in context).


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Diana Loos: But be careful of the preposition: not "in" but "at" the back of beyond - !
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Diana; but if you google the whole expression, you may agree I'm actually right

agree  Paul Skidmore
1 day9 hrs

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: Hi David, did you see my Timbuktu? Just a question.:)
2 days11 hrs
  -> I saw something remarkably similar... funnily enough, that was one of my dad's faves...
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Timbuckthree


Explanation:
s'gibt auch ein Vorderposemuckel. But that's probably not a problem here.
I think you might need a name for this town, just as in the German original.

"Nowhereville" would be an option, maybe
Timbuktu/Timbucktoo (although it might not be politically correct - there is a Timbucktu in Africa and it's a "center")
better Timbuckthree to get the "Hinter" part across
Hick(s)ville might be another option.



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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-26 19:33:15 GMT)
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Boontown ...another one

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-26 19:39:26 GMT)
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http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006051015415
Timbucktoo

http://www.missouridevelopment.org/upload/agendaforweb2.pdf
Boontown, USA (= rural town)

http://home.arcor.de/hsv-groebern/1024x768/kolumne-8a-0304.h...
Womöglich ist dann irgendwo bei einer Begegnung zwischen Hinterposemuckel und Vorderposemuckel gleich ein ganzes Quartett (den 4. offiziellen wollen wir mal nicht vergessen!) angereist!!!!

here's another very good one, small and remote, and very similar to the German expression:

Bally-Go-Backwards

see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placeholder_name




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Note added at 11 hrs (2008-04-27 04:24:44 GMT)
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reply to your comment: yes, maybe; however, the first part of that town name makes me also think of something else that has to do with a restaurant chain. :)

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Note added at 11 hrs (2008-04-27 04:26:02 GMT)
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corr: makes me think of something else - a restaurant chain.

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Note added at 2 days10 hrs (2008-04-29 03:21:10 GMT) Post-grading
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Did you see I had suggested Timbuktu/Timbukthree before David posted it again. I understand you like all of David's suggestions but a little recognition would have been appreciated.

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Note added at 3 days2 hrs (2008-04-29 19:21:57 GMT) Post-grading
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Thanks for your reply. I did suggest Timbuktu. It wasn't my first suggestion. It wasn't David's first suggestion either. But I did suggest it first.
What I mean to say is when you choose a term, it should be taken from the suggestions of the person who first posted the term. That's how I practice it. Also see Melanie's agree to my answer.
I thought maybe you hadn't seen that I had suggested Timbuktu or weren't familiar with this practice.
My comments are more about how things are practiced in KudoZ than trying to get the points. The most important thing is that the correct term is selected.
Your understanding is appreciated.

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Note added at 3 days2 hrs (2008-04-29 19:33:12 GMT) Post-grading
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PS: I accept your decision though. You stated that you liked all of the suggestions David posted although you seem to find Timbuktu pretty perfect for the name of the town. One could say the problem lies more with David's repost of one of my suggestions.

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Note added at 3 days2 hrs (2008-04-29 20:05:09 GMT) Post-grading
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Just regarding glossary entries: If you choose an answer, you should usually make clear (explain) why you like it, and you did. But yes, sometimes that doesn't happen; the asker just chooses without explanation or the computer automatically selects an answer based on most peer agrees. However, YOU can immediately enter the term in the glossary when you choose it/award the points. If you do not, then it's up to the answerer to enter it in the glossary - he/she will be sent a link and invited to do so - (and yes, you're right, if you had chosen mine, I could have just entered Timbuckthree which I probably wouldn't have, based on your comments). Only if that doesn't happen, a moderator would be the one who has to finally enter it in the glossary.
Just in case you did not know that.



Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 01:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: For a US audience at least (and the other English-speakers might be able to infer it from the sound), a name that might really get the point across is "Hooterville," a fictional rural town from two 1960s TV series.

Asker: I appreciate you! You are appreciated! However, I can only award the points to one person, and your suggestion was "Timbukthree," which is not something I'd choose. Thank you though!

Asker: You mentioned "Timbucktu" inside your post, but I'd have to award points to the suggestion you led with, which was "Timbuckthree". If I chose that as my answer (despite "Timbucktu" being mentioned inside your post), you (or a moderator) could add "Timbuckthree" to the glossary as a translation of this term, which I didn't want to happen. You're right though that David had more suggestions, all of which I liked.

Asker: Thanks for the information. The bottom line is: I liked the response I chose more than I liked yours. Thank you for your assistance.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Melanie Nassar : Sorry, I didn't read far enough to see that you already suggested Hicksville
20 hrs
  -> thank you, Melanie!
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Changes made by editors
Apr 27, 2008 - Changes made by Ulrike Kraemer:
Field (specific)General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings


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