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Translation theft report

English translation: See suggestion

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Translation theft report
English translation:See suggestion
Entered by: iPROBE
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22:35 Feb 16, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
German term or phrase: Translation theft report
We are in the in the process of translating a theft report issued by the Bundesgrenzschutzinspektion Frankfurt/Main into English. The Anlage zur Strafanzeige under Geschaedigte(r) has fields for the insertion of the personal information of the victim. The fields contain small print spelling out the information to be inserted but also abbreviations preceding each field. We contacted the officer who handled the case in Germany and not even he was sure about all of them. Please find below some of the suggestions we were given:

PVN - Personen Vorname (Even though it appears twice for both first AND last name)

PGB - Personen Geburtsname Bestandteil - a guess on part of the officer

PGD - Personen Geburts Datum

TAO- Taeter Aufenthalts Ort ( even though the address is for the VICTIM NOT THE PERPETRATOR)

It seems that translating these acronyms may cause more confusion than create clarity. Do you think that omitting a translation is permissible and if so how would we indicate in the translation that the acronyms are untranslated?


Lastly the same documents contains a list of stolen items under the heading of: Erstrebtes/Erlangtes Gut it has been suggested to us to use requested/obtained goods as an English translation - this seems to "positive" to us since what is meant is that these are the items the thief tried to or succeeded in stealing according to police.

Any suggestions regarding the above would be much appreciated.
iPROBE
Local time: 14:59
See suggestion
Explanation:
I believe that this is a case for a translator's note in which you could point out that it was not possible to research these acronyms, as even the officer handling the case wasn't sure of their meaning. In my opinion you are perfectly justified in omitting their translation, as any such translation can only be based on conjecture, therefore leading to confusion.

Also, the practical purpose of these acronyms is obviously close to nil even in the German text (let alone in any translation) if the person dealing with those documents doesn't know what they mean.

In conclusion, imo translating them would only create confusion without adding anything helpful.

As to your query re: erstrebtes/erlanges Gut - I would propose "coveted/procured goods". While "procure" is perfect legalese (procured by theft, for example (durch Diebstahl erlangt)), I'm not too sure about "covet" (=begehren), sounds a bit biblical. But that may just fit the rather archaic register of most legal texts.
Selected response from:

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 06:59
Grading comment
Thank you very much Beate!
Regards,
Julie
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3See suggestionBeate Lutzebaeck


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
See suggestion


Explanation:
I believe that this is a case for a translator's note in which you could point out that it was not possible to research these acronyms, as even the officer handling the case wasn't sure of their meaning. In my opinion you are perfectly justified in omitting their translation, as any such translation can only be based on conjecture, therefore leading to confusion.

Also, the practical purpose of these acronyms is obviously close to nil even in the German text (let alone in any translation) if the person dealing with those documents doesn't know what they mean.

In conclusion, imo translating them would only create confusion without adding anything helpful.

As to your query re: erstrebtes/erlanges Gut - I would propose "coveted/procured goods". While "procure" is perfect legalese (procured by theft, for example (durch Diebstahl erlangt)), I'm not too sure about "covet" (=begehren), sounds a bit biblical. But that may just fit the rather archaic register of most legal texts.

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 06:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 227
Grading comment
Thank you very much Beate!
Regards,
Julie

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  roneill: Absolutely, no point in compounding a problem. I must admit that my first thought on seeing "erstrebt" was to use "targeted" in English, but that is not at all legal, just a gut reaction and would ruin the register!
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Rónat

agree  Robert Kleemaier
3 hrs

agree  Michael Bailey
9 hrs
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