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Rechtskandidat

English translation: Rechtskandidat(in) (footnote: Qualified Candidate for the Final State Examination in Law)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Rechtskandidat(in)
English translation:Rechtskandidat(in) (footnote: Qualified Candidate for the Final State Examination in Law)
Entered by: Eckhard Boehle
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- Include in personal glossary

17:01 Mar 25, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
German term or phrase: Rechtskandidat
Someone who has passed the First Judicial State Examination in Germany with an honours degree.

Another possible term for this person is "Diplom-Jurist"
Eckhard Boehle
Germany
Local time: 00:14
No easy answers, but an explanation that may help you to find the best answer ...
Explanation:
Many have said it before, and I say it again: of course you can compare German and Anglo-Saxon legal systems, but you cannot convey a title typically held under one system to a holder of a title under the other system.

These are quotes from a certificate issued to me by the Secretariat of the Standing Conference of Ministers of Eduction and Cultural Affairs of the Laender in the Federal Republic of Germany:
"Under the traditional (two-tier) course for the study of law, students study at university for a minimum of seven semesters and then take the first state examination (Referendarexamen) over a period of approx. 6 months. This is followed by two-and-a-half years of preparatory service (Referendardienst) after which the student must complete the second state examination (Assessorexamen). ...
With regard to the system of higher education in Great Britain and New Zealand there is no equivalent to the German "State Examination in Law" because the British and the German legal system differ.

I don't think there is a short answer to your question. Neither "junior lawyer" nor "LLB" would work, as both entitle the holder to admission to the bar and to practice law, which is not the case for a "Diplom-Jurist".

The introduction of the title Diplom-Jurist for people who terminate their legal studies after the first State Examination is a recent development. This enables people to acquire a basic legal education to complement other studies (e.g. journalists, political scientists, engineers who deal with patents). And, as s.b. mentioned before, Diplom-Jurist is the title for lawyers/jurists who qualified in the former GDR - but that's an entirely different story.

I dont't think that "diploma in law" is a good idea either, as this would qualify the holder to practice law:
"Diploma in Law/Common Professional Examination Course (CPE)
Diploma in Law/CPE
This one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) course is open to graduates who do not hold a qualifying degree in law but who wish to become barristers or solicitors."
Besides, it's a post-graduate course (I found numerous Google hits for "diploma in law" - as an example, see the one below).

I also googled for "legal diploma", but this seems to be a title awarded to all sorts of other people (administrators, technologists, etc).

Finally, para-legal or legal secretary would not cut it either, as they are legal professions assisting and supporting lawyers, whereas a Diplom-Jurist (or Assessor) has not received any legal training whatsoever to fulfil such a function, but has completed an academic course.

Neither would "legal scientist" work, as this would come down to Rechtswissenschaftler (s.b. teaching and researching law).

Selected response from:

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 10:14
Grading comment
Thank you all answerers for sweat and brain (cell) racking!
I was overwhelmed seeing the results your efforts and it wasn't easy to choose.
My own solution was sth. not recommended by you - a footnote leaving the "Rechtskandidat(in)" and taking GATI's suggestion as explanation of the term: 'Qualified Candidate for the Final State Examination in Law'.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1qualified candidate for the final state exam after passing the first state examination in GermanyxxxGATI
5holder of a diploma in lawWerner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
4(Holder of a) law degree
Adam Smith
4Junior lawyergangels
5 -1Bachelor's Degree in Law
Poornima Iyengar
3No easy answers, but an explanation that may help you to find the best answer ...Beate Lutzebaeck


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Bachelor's Degree in Law


Explanation:
See the reference I found from a biligual site. It's a resume.

HTH

GERMAN
Rechtsanwalt an der Anwaltschaft in Leuven seit dem Jahr 2000

Domänen:
- Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht
- Verwaltungsrecht
- Sozialrecht

Sprachen: niederländisch, französisch, englisch

Rechtskandidat UFSIA (1996)
Lizentiat der Rechte K.U.LEUVEN (1999)
Ergänzende Fortbildung Kriminographie (K.U.LEUVEN 2000)
Schiedsrichter Köninkl. Belg. Fussballbund (1992-2000


ENGLISH
Jurgen van der VELDEN
Attorney at the Bar of Leuven since 2000

Areas:
- Criminal law and Criminal procedure
- Administrative Law
- Social Law

Languages: Dutch, French, English

Bachelor Degree in Law, UFSIA, Antwerp (1996)
Licence Degree in Law, K.U.LEUVEN (1999)
Supplementary Licence Degree in Criminology, K.U.LEUVEN (2000)
Referee, Royal Belgian Soccer League since 1992


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 17:34:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry for the typo. I meant \'bilingual\'!!!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 17:53:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The person will be simply called a \'lawyer/ attorney/solicitor.


    Reference: http://www.legrand-law.com/DE/vandervelden.htm
    Reference: http://www.legrand-law.com/EN/vandervelden.htm
Poornima Iyengar
Local time: 03:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 162

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): A bachelor's degree in law (=LLB) is the final degree that allows you to take the bar exam and practise. You could call it a "diploma in law", for example (in line with UK and Commonwealth terminology).
43 mins
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
qualified candidate for the final state exam after passing the first state examination in Germany


Explanation:
There is no exact equivalent in the U.S. legal system (if the translation is meant for the U.S.). You can only describe it. The German system is a two-tier approach to obtain the degree of an attorney.
The Diplom-Jurist was the designation of a lawer educated in the former GDR entitling the candidate to become a judge.

xxxGATI
PRO pts in pair: 15

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Beate Lutzebaeck: This answer comes closest - but I'm racking my brain cell to make it shorter!
3 hrs
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Junior lawyer


Explanation:
is someone fresh out of law school. Only colleges award bachelor degrees, so he may have one in pre-law, but the "bar examination" can only be taken after completion of law school.

gangels
Local time: 16:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 5465
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
holder of a diploma in law


Explanation:
Diploma in law is something I have come across in the UK and Commonwealth system. It does not enable you to take the bar examination, but it is a "first step" towards your final law degree (or you discontinue your studies at that point and become a paralegal or something). Some law schools award such a "diploma" for, say, the first half of a complete law-school curriculum in order to give dropouts some kind of "paper".

Please note: it is not a bachelor's degree (LL.B.), as this would be the designation of the final degree in the UK, Canada and other Commonwealth countries (equivalent to the US "J.D").

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 18:14
PRO pts in pair: 238
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(Holder of a) law degree


Explanation:
The first state examination occurs after 4-5 years at university. Succesful completion of this stage leads to the 'Referendarzeit', which is a combination of academic and vocational training. Candidates need to complete the second state exams following this (after about 2 years), before they are entitled to practice as lawyers, or undertake further training to become judges.

Across Europe there is a distinction between the academic stage and vocational stage of legal training. The first stage ends with a degree in law (e.g. LLB, meester in de rechten, maitre en droit, etc.). This corresponds to the German 'First State Exam'. Candidates then complete a combination of further academic training and vocational training (in England this corresponds to either completing the post-graduate diploma in legal practice, or the bar vocational exam, followed by works as a trainee solicitor or pupillage), before being allowed to practice independently.

The diploma in law (e.g. www.londonexternal.ac.uk, follow links to law) is a pre-degree course, usually for individuals who who left school and did not complete their A-levels.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 19:43:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree that bachelor\'s degree could also be used. However,since you can also qualify for the academic stage by completing a post-graduate in law, a \'law degree\' is less specific.


    Reference: http://webjcli.ncl.ac.uk/articles4/leith4.html
Adam Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
No easy answers, but an explanation that may help you to find the best answer ...


Explanation:
Many have said it before, and I say it again: of course you can compare German and Anglo-Saxon legal systems, but you cannot convey a title typically held under one system to a holder of a title under the other system.

These are quotes from a certificate issued to me by the Secretariat of the Standing Conference of Ministers of Eduction and Cultural Affairs of the Laender in the Federal Republic of Germany:
"Under the traditional (two-tier) course for the study of law, students study at university for a minimum of seven semesters and then take the first state examination (Referendarexamen) over a period of approx. 6 months. This is followed by two-and-a-half years of preparatory service (Referendardienst) after which the student must complete the second state examination (Assessorexamen). ...
With regard to the system of higher education in Great Britain and New Zealand there is no equivalent to the German "State Examination in Law" because the British and the German legal system differ.

I don't think there is a short answer to your question. Neither "junior lawyer" nor "LLB" would work, as both entitle the holder to admission to the bar and to practice law, which is not the case for a "Diplom-Jurist".

The introduction of the title Diplom-Jurist for people who terminate their legal studies after the first State Examination is a recent development. This enables people to acquire a basic legal education to complement other studies (e.g. journalists, political scientists, engineers who deal with patents). And, as s.b. mentioned before, Diplom-Jurist is the title for lawyers/jurists who qualified in the former GDR - but that's an entirely different story.

I dont't think that "diploma in law" is a good idea either, as this would qualify the holder to practice law:
"Diploma in Law/Common Professional Examination Course (CPE)
Diploma in Law/CPE
This one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) course is open to graduates who do not hold a qualifying degree in law but who wish to become barristers or solicitors."
Besides, it's a post-graduate course (I found numerous Google hits for "diploma in law" - as an example, see the one below).

I also googled for "legal diploma", but this seems to be a title awarded to all sorts of other people (administrators, technologists, etc).

Finally, para-legal or legal secretary would not cut it either, as they are legal professions assisting and supporting lawyers, whereas a Diplom-Jurist (or Assessor) has not received any legal training whatsoever to fulfil such a function, but has completed an academic course.

Neither would "legal scientist" work, as this would come down to Rechtswissenschaftler (s.b. teaching and researching law).




    Reference: http://www.city.ac.uk/pgrad/law/cpe.htm
    Reference: http://www.thueringen.de/de/justiz/loader.asp?datei=http://w...
Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 10:14
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2079
Grading comment
Thank you all answerers for sweat and brain (cell) racking!
I was overwhelmed seeing the results your efforts and it wasn't easy to choose.
My own solution was sth. not recommended by you - a footnote leaving the "Rechtskandidat(in)" and taking GATI's suggestion as explanation of the term: 'Qualified Candidate for the Final State Examination in Law'.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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