KudoZ home » German to English » Law/Patents

Satz (im Gesetz)

English translation: section 321 (1) sentence 3 of the HGB

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
01:49 Apr 2, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
German term or phrase: Satz (im Gesetz)
§ 321 Abs. 1 Satz 3 HGB

Article 321, Paragraph 1, ???3 of the HGB (German Commercial Code)

I have seen differing translations of these 3 terms (§, Abs., Satz) and would appreciate advice from colleagues with legal expertise as to whether there are "official" or "accepted" translations for them?

Thanks in advance.
Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 10:11
English translation:section 321 (1) sentence 3 of the HGB
Explanation:
is my standard way of dealing with §, Absatz and Satz respectively.

My two cents...

Alison
Selected response from:

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 16:11
Grading comment
I especially like this "streamlined" format, but appreciate everyone's suggestions, and especially the helpful explanations. Thanks, ya'll!

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2My 2 centsWerner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
4 +2section 321 (1) sentence 3 of the HGB
Alison Schwitzgebel
4 +2See explanation
Kim Metzger
5Section 321 (1) (3) HGB
Dr. Fred Thomson
5Article, paragraph and sentencexxxGATI


  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Article, paragraph and sentence


Explanation:
Although § represents article in English, I leave the symbol in the text(in agreement with most attorneys), with a notation that it represents article. The § symbol facilitates it for the recipient to follow the original and respond accordingly.
Paragraph in U.S. legal texts is usually written as Para ...

xxxGATI
PRO pts in pair: 15
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
See explanation


Explanation:
I think you'll find considerable disagreement on this subject. But this is what I've been using:
§ = section (article)
Absatz = paragraph
Ziffer = item (figure)(subsection)
Teilziffer = sub-item








Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 09:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21821

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels
28 mins

agree  Elvira Stoianov
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Section 321 (1) (3) HGB


Explanation:
This is one way to get the job done. You can keep the symbol for section or write it out, but then you don't write in paragraph nor sentence (or sub-paragraph).
I use the Unifrom System of Citation that most lawyers across the US use. The above approach is that shown on page 18 (lawyers say "at p. 18).


Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): Not quite: "(3)" would be interpreted to mean "subparagraph" in your example; sometimes, these may coincide, but this is not necessarily the case.
39 mins
  -> You're right.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
My 2 cents


Explanation:
Paragraph:

"Section" - this is to be used in most legal contexts. "Article" is usually reserved for legal documents of an international nature such as treaties or agreements of international organizations (e.g., UN).

Absatz:

"Paragraph" - often shortened to "para." or "para" (without punctuation)

Satz:

"Sentence"

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 10:11
PRO pts in pair: 238

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Beate Lutzebaeck: This (in addition to the usage of brackets which may cause confusion) is the accepted citation system in Commonwealth countries. Beth: § may or may not be understood by US lawyers, it's unknown under the British system. Ziffer = No.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

neutral  Rod Darby: I use section and sentence, but find "sub-section" better for "Absatz": "paragraph" is too close to the German name for that symbol my editor doesn't want me to type.
4 hrs
  -> Interesting!

agree  Regina Landeck: Although sometimes i have been asked to use "clause" for "sentence".
11 hrs
  -> Thank you, Regina
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
section 321 (1) sentence 3 of the HGB


Explanation:
is my standard way of dealing with §, Absatz and Satz respectively.

My two cents...

Alison

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 16:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3409
Grading comment
I especially like this "streamlined" format, but appreciate everyone's suggestions, and especially the helpful explanations. Thanks, ya'll!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rod Darby: absolute agreement
47 mins

agree  Barbara Schulten, MSc (OXON), DPSI
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search