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Zeitguthaben

English translation: (earned) credit hours

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07:05 Jun 30, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / Labour law
German term or phrase: Zeitguthaben
This seems to refer to a situation where an employee has worked more hours than his regular working hours thus acquiring "credit hours". Does anyone know if a parallel conceot exists in Anglo-US usage?
bap
English translation:(earned) credit hours
Explanation:
here's one of thousands of examples:

What are credit hours? Hours worked by an employee on a flexible schedule that
are in excess of the employee's basic work requirement and that the employee ...
policy.fws.gov/do115.html
Selected response from:

Nicole Tata
Local time: 13:34
Grading comment
Thank you very much everybody for your suggestions and feedback. I also liked Maureen Holm's suggestion, and I don't feel confident enough to put anything specific in the glossary.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6time creditRowan Morrell
4 +2(earned) credit hours
Nicole Tata
3 +2overtime credit/ overtime premium
Olaf Reibedanz
4accrued time off
Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.
4(Comment)TonyTK
4time creditxxxIanW


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
time credit


Explanation:
Possibly.

In the Dicdata dictionary, I found "Zeitguthabenabrechnung", which is rendered as "time-credit accounting". From that it can be inferred that "Zeitguthaben" means time credit, but let's see what others opine.


    Reference: http://www.dicdata.de
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 00:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1459

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxIanW: Quicker on the draw, Rowan ...
1 min
  -> Thanks Ian.

agree  CathyFS
45 mins
  -> Thanks Cathy.

agree  Daniela Schlöder
1 hr
  -> Thanks Daniela.

agree  TonyTK: aka "banked hours"
1 hr
  -> That's interesting. Thanks Tony.

agree  Krokodil: Yes, that's what it's referred to where I work, but I'd also go along with "credit hours" (see suggestion below)
5 hrs
  -> Looks like a toss-up between this one and the one you mentioned. Thanks Croc.

agree  Fabian Stoffers
1 day2 hrs
  -> Thanks Fabian.

neutral  Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.: see suggestion, more like TonyTK's 'banked hours' -- "time credit" hasa consumer ring to it
2 days5 hrs
  -> Not to me it doesn't (particularly after six "agrees"), but thanks anyway for your comments, Maureen. (Mind you, "accrued time off" doesn't sound too bad.)
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
time credit


Explanation:
My Hamblock and Wessels states "time credit", and this would seem to me to cover all possibilities.

Hope this helps


Ian

xxxIanW
Local time: 14:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2468
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
overtime credit/ overtime premium


Explanation:
would be my suggestion

Olaf Reibedanz
Colombia
Local time: 07:34
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 902

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mary McCusker: overtime credit - in fact, in my experience (mainly UN) overtime does not always have to be paid, but can be compensated by time off...
54 mins

agree  ezbounty@aol.co
7 hrs
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53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(earned) credit hours


Explanation:
here's one of thousands of examples:

What are credit hours? Hours worked by an employee on a flexible schedule that
are in excess of the employee's basic work requirement and that the employee ...
policy.fws.gov/do115.html

Nicole Tata
Local time: 13:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1326
Grading comment
Thank you very much everybody for your suggestions and feedback. I also liked Maureen Holm's suggestion, and I don't feel confident enough to put anything specific in the glossary.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bob Kerns: I prefer this answer, without "earned"
10 mins

agree  ezbounty@aol.co
7 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(Comment)


Explanation:
If this is about "Arbeitszeitkonten" (working time accounts) - which I assume it is - it's important to be precise about the terminology - particularly in the blue-collar segment, where the whole point of time accounts/time banking is that it renders overtime (in the conventional sense) unnecessary.


TonyTK
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1090
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2 days5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
accrued time off


Explanation:
Agree that the overtime thing is off the mark.
An employee accrues time off, in this case by working hours he's not typically required to and thus can take the time off another time.
The key with accrual is accumulation and carry over. If I work for ten years and take no vacation, I may lose the time.
"Time credit" sounds weird to me, more like buying on time (consumer purchase).

Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.
United States
Local time: 08:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 986
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