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Vergelt's Gott

English translation: God bless you

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Vergelt's Gott
English translation:God bless you
Entered by: Textklick
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12:47 Apr 5, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
German term or phrase: Vergelt's Gott
"God bless you" was a translation which I found this morning, but I think that it sounds somehow strange...
Iris Schlagheck-Weber
Local time: 13:05
God bless you
Explanation:
Grosser Duden>Oxford

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Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-05 12:56:42 GMT)
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Why strange?

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Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-05 12:56:52 GMT)
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Why strange?
Selected response from:

Textklick
Local time: 12:05
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8God bless you
Textklick
4 +2May God reward youxxxIanW
4commentsKen Cox
3thank you from my heartntext


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
May God reward you


Explanation:
My Langenscheidt explains that this is a "Dankesformel", so would suggest "May God reward you"

xxxIanW
Local time: 13:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cilian O'Tuama: vergelts Gott! (dated) God bless you, may you be rewarded - Collins
2 hrs

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: May God make it up to you, reward you
3 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
God bless you


Explanation:
Grosser Duden>Oxford

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-05 12:56:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Why strange?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-05 12:56:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Why strange?

Textklick
Local time: 12:05
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  welsh1981: Collins German Dictionary has "God bless you" as well. Do you mean the German is strange? Does you want this "strangeness" replicating in the English?
4 mins
  -> Cheers -good point. Am I right in assuming that this is used mostly in Bavaria/Austria?

agree  Colin Newberry: Nothing wrong with "God bless you", and as far as I know it's mainly used down here in Bavaria and Austria.
41 mins
  -> Servus ;-)

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: "May God bless you"
1 hr
  -> Danke :-)

agree  Sueg: You could use just "God Bless" as a short form IMO the way it is used in Austria.
1 hr
  -> Thanks - that really means "Take care", as in "Goodbye and God bless". Not really a "Dankesformel"

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
1 hr
  -> Danke Heidrun :-)

agree  ezbounty@aol.co
4 hrs
  -> Bless you, Ellen ;-)

agree  Armorel Young: it's "God reward you" that sounds strange, because that's a literal translation that isn't actually used in English, whereas "God bless you" is perfectly normal (in certain circles, that is)
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Armorel

agree  jerrie
17 hrs
  -> Thanks Jerrie
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
thank you from my heart


Explanation:
"Vergelt's Gott" is normally used as a form of "thank you" — in the sense of "may God reward you for what you have done for me."

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Note added at 27 mins (2004-04-05 13:15:39 GMT)
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\"God bless you\" in the sense of \"thank you\' is also possible, of course — as is \"bless your heart.\" (These expressions may sound quaint to you, but the German term is a bit quaint as well.)

ntext
United States
Local time: 06:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
comments


Explanation:
'God bless you' is used by many UK Engish speakers a formal and sincere expression of thanks (unless it's used ironically, of course). It is quite often used spontaneously, and although formal, it can also be used among good acquaintances and friends. However, it would be understood rather more literally by most US English speakers, and not necessarily as an expression of thanks. In the US it means something more like 'you're a (really) good person for doing that'. That makes it more an expression of appreciation than an expression of thanks. In the US it is most often used by truly religious persons or by persons who wish to (more or less ostentateously) give the impression of being religious.

Ken Cox
Local time: 13:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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