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Sprichwort

English translation: See suggestion...

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12:01 Aug 4, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
German term or phrase: Sprichwort
In Hotels findet man solche Sprichwörter oft am morgentlichen Buffettisch....

"(Lieber Gast) Essen Sie sich fit, aber nehmen Sie nichts mit!"

Ich suche nicht eine wörtliche Übersetzung, sondern etwas, das im Englischen gleichen Sinn macht..

Danke
Elvira Schmid
Italy
Local time: 00:11
English translation:See suggestion...
Explanation:
this is tricky, as in UK hotels we would *not* normally have solche Sprichwoerter - it's quite a Germanic thing!

Instead, I would rephrase it into a polite message, perhaps:
"While we are happy for you to enjoy an ample breakfast, we would kindly ask guests to refrain from taking food out of the restaurant."

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Note added at 11 mins (2004-08-04 12:13:25 GMT)
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Ian\'s note is relevant - I was thinking of adding that this kind of rule-making is seen as a bit of a Germanic obsession by English-speakers.
If your client insists on having this notice in English, too, it might be best to shorten it even further:
\"Guests are kindly requested to refrain from taking breakfast items out of the restaurant.\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-08-04 12:40:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another daft one (this is stopping me from getting on with my work!):

With some butter and jam, Fill uppa your bun
But steal some ham, you\'ll meet Attila the Hun!

OR

Don\'t refrain from eating up
But steal some food
And the game\'s soon up.

OR

Butter, jam, ham and cheese,
Take some out - we\'ll call the police.
Selected response from:

Dr Andrew Read
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:11
Grading comment
Ich muss diese Punkte einfach Andrew geben, da er sich soooo viel Mühe gemacht hat und einige Vorschläge wirklich zum Biegen komisch sind. Bei Ians Antwort musste ich allerdings auch ziemlich lachen...danke allen für die rege Teilnahme...muss mich erst für etwas entscheiden, nicht so leicht
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9See suggestion...
Dr Andrew Read
1 +7Ignore this suggestionxxxIanW
4 +1eat all you wish - but please no take-out
swisstell
3 +1Eat your fill...
Steven Sidore
4eat all you wish - but please no doggy bags
swisstell
3Please do not take food out to feed fish (or any other purpose)
Klaus Herrmann
1 +2food to be consumed in the breakfast room only
Jonathan MacKerron
3perhapsgangels


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Ignore this suggestion


Explanation:
Personally, I'd be pretty annoyed if I saw something like that. On this note, I would suggest: "Eat your fill and even more / But we'll search you once you reach the door"

Only joking :-)

xxxIanW
Local time: 00:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christian: If I saw something like this, I would also think that the hotel staff regard their guests as potential thieves. It's not really a warm welcome, is it?
3 mins

agree  tectranslate ITS GmbH: Eat your meal while it is hot - thieves will instantly be shot.
4 mins

agree  Dr Andrew Read: Stuff your face / Don't leave a trace / But steal a bun / And it won't be fun! OR Fill your belly / With ice cream and jelly / But don't rob food / It's very rude! etc etc etc ;-)
13 mins

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: Dine here, take nowt away / And live to dine another day (scraping the barrel) / Heidrun's (below) is good and could even be used! /Added: in a holiday setting, I might - though not now that we have more context
14 mins
  -> Yes, but would you stay in a hotel that said that?

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: stuff your face, not your pockets ;-))
16 mins

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: I like Heidrun's take
1 hr

agree  leipert: i used to own a restaurant: ilicit "take-aways" are bad for everyones business
1 hr
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
perhaps


Explanation:
Eat all you care and go about – but PLEASE, absolutely no carryout!


Only cheapo outfits might post something like that, no hotel of any standing would

gangels
Local time: 16:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 11
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Eat your fill...


Explanation:
I saw a sign to this effect in the US once, I think it ran thusly:

Eat your fill,
We'll make no druthers
But please leave the rest
For all the others

HTH!

Steven Sidore
Germany
Local time: 00:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: I like that, if you MUST say something...
7 mins
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
eat all you wish - but please no take-out


Explanation:
I've seen it in the US, in connection with buffets and TAKE-OUT or take-away are common expressions. Incidentally, I would not quite call it a "Sprichwort"

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: very good suggestion, IMO
2 hrs
  -> danke, Heidrun
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
See suggestion...


Explanation:
this is tricky, as in UK hotels we would *not* normally have solche Sprichwoerter - it's quite a Germanic thing!

Instead, I would rephrase it into a polite message, perhaps:
"While we are happy for you to enjoy an ample breakfast, we would kindly ask guests to refrain from taking food out of the restaurant."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-08-04 12:13:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ian\'s note is relevant - I was thinking of adding that this kind of rule-making is seen as a bit of a Germanic obsession by English-speakers.
If your client insists on having this notice in English, too, it might be best to shorten it even further:
\"Guests are kindly requested to refrain from taking breakfast items out of the restaurant.\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-08-04 12:40:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another daft one (this is stopping me from getting on with my work!):

With some butter and jam, Fill uppa your bun
But steal some ham, you\'ll meet Attila the Hun!

OR

Don\'t refrain from eating up
But steal some food
And the game\'s soon up.

OR

Butter, jam, ham and cheese,
Take some out - we\'ll call the police.

Dr Andrew Read
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
Grading comment
Ich muss diese Punkte einfach Andrew geben, da er sich soooo viel Mühe gemacht hat und einige Vorschläge wirklich zum Biegen komisch sind. Bei Ians Antwort musste ich allerdings auch ziemlich lachen...danke allen für die rege Teilnahme...muss mich erst für etwas entscheiden, nicht so leicht

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxIanW: Or just "Please do not take food out of the restaurant" - the shorter the better, in my opinion. Perhaps they could introduce some sort of subtle radar system ...
2 mins
  -> ;-) See my note above. Do you see this sort of thing in Germany?

agree  Wenke Geddert: but I have to admit I love tectransDE's suggestion ;-)
3 mins
  -> I've put some more silly ones under Ian's answer above ;-)

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: maybe sth. like 'only for consumption in the restaurant'
3 mins
  -> A tiny bit harsh, perhaps, but could be best in view of the asker's new explanation above.

agree  Christian: Andrew, I saw such a "Eat your fill, but pay your bill" note in Germany only once or twice.
7 mins
  -> I wasn't meaning to be anti-German, but the German-speaking nationsdo have a bit of a reputation for this (however unfair) in the UK. ;-)

agree  tectranslate ITS GmbH: "Please do not take food out of the restaurant" is just right. Funnily enough, I've only seen signs (in a fast food establishment) that said the opposite: Wir bitten darum, keine mitgebrachten Speisen zu verzehren. (because that would hurt their sales)
9 mins
  -> Actually, we do have quite a few notices like that in the UK: "Guests are requested not to consume their own food on the premises", etc.

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
14 mins

agree  Richard Benham: Tuck it away; don't take it away??
14 mins

agree  Sabine Griebler: In contrast, you can bring your own food, but not the drinks, to a Bavarian beer garden.
34 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann: Whenever I read something about Germans being overly accurate I want to correct it ;)
57 mins

neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: 'm with Klaus
1 hr

agree  Meturgan: with Ian Winick
1 hr

disagree  Kevin Pfeiffer: One point deduction (you can afford it) for trying to rhyme "cheese" and "police" ;-)
3 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
food to be consumed in the breakfast room only


Explanation:
another take

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 27 mins (2004-08-04 13:29:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

anyvon kot making sandviches vill be shot and sent to the russian front, in zat ordah

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 34 mins (2004-08-04 13:36:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

which reminds me of a great line from Dr. Stangelove \"Gentlemen, there\'ll be no fighting in the War Room!\"

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  tectranslate ITS GmbH: "Don't dare eating on the patio. No, we don't care how nice the weather is." Otherwise, good suggestion. :)
11 mins
  -> thx

agree  Dr Andrew Read: Excellent "sensible" suggestion, and some funny quotes.
22 mins
  -> or perhaps "there'll be no eating in the breakfast room" heh heh

agree  gangels
1 hr
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Please do not take food out to feed fish (or any other purpose)


Explanation:
Strictly mo doggy-bagging.

A more subtle approach...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 30 mins (2004-08-04 14:32:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

*no* doggy-bagging

Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  tectranslate ITS GmbH: The' won't be no mo' doggy-baggin in he' // d'oh, was just meant to be "neutral".
23 mins
  -> No food beyond this point? http://www.gneil.com/product/867.asp?cat_id=426
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
eat all you wish - but please no doggy bags


Explanation:
is another often used sign in the US (and somewhat "gentler" than the other versions, such as "no take-away")

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4
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