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Denken Sie um die Ecke!

English translation: Expect the unexpected!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Denken Sie um die Ecke!
English translation:Expect the unexpected!
Entered by: Bob Kerns
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:12 May 14, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Press Relations
German term or phrase: Denken Sie um die Ecke!
This is at the end of a 40-page guide for employees of a company as to how to deal with journalists' inquiries and how to react in interviews with the press:

Noch eins zum Schluss:
Denken Sie um die Ecke!
Bob Kerns
Germany
Local time: 20:33
Expect the unexpected!
Explanation:
Problems with unauthorised quotes and/or press coverage arise because journalists manage to entice employees to say things they later regret - often this is the result of a situation where the interviewee does not recognise what an 'innocent' quote might do when quoted out of context.

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Note added at 2002-05-14 13:50:25 (GMT)
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Thanks for all your kind comments!
Selected response from:

Ralf Lemster
Germany
Local time: 20:33
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for a superb response. To those of you whose answer wasn't selected (especially Sarah): Keep up the good work!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +12Expect the unexpected!
Ralf Lemster
5 +4Think outside the box!
David Wigtil
4 +4And one last point: Think ahead!
Sarah Downing
4 +2Background
Kim Metzger
5 +1Think outside the box or unconventionallysommerfeld
4 +1And last, but not least: Think ahead!Jan Liebelt
4 +1think different!
schmurr
4think lateral
Wynona Kaspar
4think on your feet
Jeannie Graham
4Think the other way!Steffen Pollex
4 -1think around the corner
swisstell
4 -2think independently
Eckhard Boehle


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
And one last point: Think ahead!


Explanation:
This is what the phrase suggests to me. I guess it could be suggesting that the PR department are prepared for what the journalists might ask them, enabling them to give effective answers.

Sarah Downing
Local time: 14:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 247

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mary Worby
3 mins
  -> Thanks Mary

agree  Jan Liebelt
8 mins
  -> Thanks Jan

agree  wrtransco
17 mins
  -> Thanks Mag. RaWa

agree  Endre Both
18 mins
  -> Thanks Endre

neutral  swisstell: if the author had wanted just a regular expression like you suggest, he could have done so in German. He tried to put the message on a food for thought basis, a challenge
2 hrs
  -> Well, for me this expression reflected what he was saying, but thanks for your comment all the same.
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
think different!


Explanation:
diferent approach, nonconformist

schmurr
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 161

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Pollex: This is slightly closer than the one above.
2 mins

neutral  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.: Apple might object... (C;
3 mins

neutral  Jan Liebelt: Whatever Apple says, it's "diffrently"
6 mins
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
think on your feet


Explanation:
or use your imagination!

Jeannie Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 256
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
think around the corner


Explanation:
is the straight translation and implies lots of thinks, including thinking ahead, not being surprised with what might be there etc. The unadulterated sentence actually invites one's own thinking which I think is quite useful. Leaves the end of the lecture with food for thought, in fact.

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3377

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Jan Liebelt: Too literal and German-sounding.
5 mins

neutral  Sarah Downing: Original, but it doesn't sound English
2 hrs
  -> hardly original, as I made a straight translation. But think: it does not sound everyday-German either and that is the pooint: the author wants something that "shocks"
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Think the other way!


Explanation:
Just one more option.

Steffen Pollex
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 503

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jan Liebelt: Are there several ways?
8 mins
  -> Of course, there are. Any topic, problem whatsoever might be considered from a different point of view and various (standard and non-standard) solutions, approaches etc. applied. This is, IMO, the meaning here.
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
And last, but not least: Think ahead!


Explanation:
Isn't the idea that you should "second-guess" what journalists etc. are going to ask?

Jan Liebelt
France
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 77

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sarah Downing: I even thought of saying "last but not least myself", but plumped for my variation - however,I think this is just as good.
4 mins
  -> Except you thought of it first. In fact, we could say you thought ahead!

agree  Martina Keskintepe
17 mins
  -> Thanks

disagree  swisstell: very conservative and not at all challenging, not what the lecturer wanted to achieve
1 hr
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Think outside the box!


Explanation:
The modern jargon in the American business world is, "to think outside the box," meaning to be one step ahead, to be creative/imaginative, to outsmart the other guy. I hear it in the office, on television, from my managers -- undique!

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 14:33
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Theo Bose: this is it
7 mins

neutral  Jan Liebelt: Only in a US context. (We) Brits would be confused - partly because "the box" is a common term for the TV.
8 mins

agree  Eckhard Boehle: this one's fine!
10 mins

neutral  Klaus Herrmann: I was tempted to say 'that's the one', but actually, that's not exactly what the German sentence means. See my comment to Ralph's answer.
13 mins

agree  Mary Worby: Jan, I've heard 'think outside the box' LOTS in the UK, don't think it would cause confusion (-:
13 mins

agree  Сергей Лузан: Quite fine.
22 mins
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Think outside the box or unconventionally


Explanation:
the statement is obviously meant to indicate a way of thinking that is not standard or straight-ahead.the common way of expressing that in current US lingo is thinking outside the box

sommerfeld

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан: "unconventionally" might be an option both for the UK & USA.
20 mins
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +12
Expect the unexpected!


Explanation:
Problems with unauthorised quotes and/or press coverage arise because journalists manage to entice employees to say things they later regret - often this is the result of a situation where the interviewee does not recognise what an 'innocent' quote might do when quoted out of context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-14 13:50:25 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for all your kind comments!

Ralf Lemster
Germany
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 2684
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for a superb response. To those of you whose answer wasn't selected (especially Sarah): Keep up the good work!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mary Worby: Sounds good, Ralf!
2 mins

agree  Endre Both
4 mins

agree  Eckhard Boehle: good point!
5 mins

agree  pschmitt
5 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann: 'Um die Ecke denken' means to connect thoughts or ideas in a not-so-obvious way. Failing to do so will result in something one didn't expect.
10 mins

agree  Sarah Downing: I think this one sounds really good - quite catchy.
11 mins

agree  Kim Metzger
15 mins

agree  Louise Mawbey: this sounds just right
20 mins

agree  Сергей Лузан: Seems to be straight to the point here, inspite of the fact, that it's far from original words. But expresses the original idea, as far as I can judge.
21 mins

agree  jerrie
49 mins

agree  Jan Liebelt: Nice one: Clear and to-the-point.
1 hr

agree  Sheila Hardie: I like it:)
1 hr
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
think independently


Explanation:
... is what is meant with "um die Ecke"
If possible (idiomatic) in English you might say "think (a)round the corner"

"Um die Ecke gedacht" is the title of a popular crossword puzzle in the journal "Die Zeit" - this works with puns, allusions and associations

HTH

Eckhard Boehle
Germany
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 523

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Jan Liebelt: "Um die Ecke" is not the same as "unabhängig". Crossword puzzles that ask you to think this way are described as cryptic.
2 mins
  -> Dear Jan, "um die Ecke denken" means thinking unconventionally, imaginatively, creatively, i.e. indenpendently

disagree  Louise Mawbey: Jan's right independently would not be used by a native speaker in this context - unconventionally, which you suggest in your note to Jan would be good though.
20 mins
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
think lateral


Explanation:
this might not fit the register of the paper, because "um die Ecke denken" is more a colloquial expression, but I believe that's what it means in essence - dont' think only on straight lines, include imagination, intuition and creativity

Wynona Kaspar
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:33
PRO pts in pair: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Louise Mawbey: would have to be lateralLY
13 mins

neutral  Jan Liebelt: In other contexts I would agree wholeheartedly. But not here.
1 hr
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Background


Explanation:
I just wanted to quote from my Duden, Redewendungen and lend support to those who see a sinister meaning. Jdm. um die Ecke bringen means to murder someone.
"Auszugehen ist von "Ecke" in der Bedeutung Haus, Straßenecke. Eingewirkt hat sicherlich auch, dass Verbrecher früher oft hinter Straßenecken lauerten und Passanten in stillere Seitenstraßen zerrten, um sie dort auszurauben."
So I think the meaning here is that employees need to exercise caution when dealing with journalists.


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 13:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21821

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан: Seems to correspond with Ralf's version quite closely.
10 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann: 'Um die Ecke denken' is not as sinister, but it uses the same image - you have to anticipate something (the unexpected) that's waiting for you around the corner.
1 hr
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