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Stacheldrahtwörter

English translation: barbed-wire words

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Stacheldrahtwörter
English translation:barbed-wire words
Entered by: Ulrike Kraemer
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11:31 Jan 17, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Marketing / Market Research / Sales training
German term or phrase: Stacheldrahtwörter
Bullet point in a document that deals with the language to be used in customer talks:

- Stacheldrahtwörter benutzen

I found this KOG entry in the FR-DE pair: http://deu.proz.com/kudoz/1584382

Expert help with the (UK) English term much appreciated!

MTIA
Ulrike Kraemer
Germany
Local time: 17:53
barbed wire words
Explanation:
words that make one not want to communicate or rather reject something ("you must buy this" instead of "let me show you how this could be advantageous for you") - the sources I found are all "negative."

http://www.salestraining.de/verkaufswissen2/foer_6.htm

Worte wie "wollen, sollen oder müssen" klingen fast immer negativ. Erfolgreiche Verkäufer vermeiden sog. negativ besetzte Wörter und sprechen in diesem Zusammenhang auch von "Stacheldrahtwörtern", weil diese Wörter ein "Näherkommen" verhindern können. Denken Sie auch immer daran, wie Sie selbst reagieren, wenn Sie jemand anspricht.

http://www.atimetolovemag.com/puttinglovetothetest/74

http://20six.co.uk/cigarette-sigh/art/105784
http://alien-dream.blogspot.com/2007/09/tomorrow-i-will.html
barbed wire words


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Note added at 15 hrs (2008-01-18 02:56:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

a few more thoughts:

I guess one could suggest to use certain sharp, pushy words that catch, entangle, rope people in, but the picture I get from "Stacheldrahtwörter" is that of the costumer being "trapped", like an animal, ...
It seems to be at least a very negative name for/way of describing that kind of language, even if it's just for the training of sales people.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2008-01-18 03:27:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

...and if one thinks of those words as catchy, sweet ones, even with the "salespeople's" idea of catching, trapping the customer, reeling him in, the term "Stacheldrahtwörter" seems very far fetched at best.
Selected response from:

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 11:53
Grading comment
Da der Kunde auf meine Rückfrage nicht reagiert hat, ich die Übersetzung aber gestern abliefern sollte, habe ich mich schlussendlich für die wörtliche Variante entschieden, um allen Interpretationen aus dem Weg zu gehen. Danke an alle für die Vorschläge und Anregungen.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2barbed wire words
Bernhard Sulzer
2 +1catch phrase
jccantrell
2barbed words
mbrodie
2words to rope people in
Paul Cohen


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
barbed words


Explanation:
nearest I can think of and it does seem to be negative

mbrodie
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
catch phrase


Explanation:
If these are positive words, then this might be what you are looking for.

catch phrase
–noun
1. a phrase that attracts or is meant to attract attention.
2. a phrase, as a slogan, that comes to be widely and repeatedly used, often with little of the original meaning remaining.

But if you are looking at just individual words, then maybe

'catchy words'


    Reference: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/catchphrase
jccantrell
United States
Local time: 08:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sharon Sideris: I agree with the idea if it is positive, but I think maybe "catchy" is better - as in "use catchy phrases"
7 hrs

neutral  Bernhard Sulzer: I think it would be a stronger concept than a catch phrase or catchy phrase; more like a "trap/trapping phrase" ? just a thought :-)
10 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
words to rope people in


Explanation:
Just a hunch based on the Asker's own interpretation of the word and the "Zauberwörter" ("power words" and "superlatives") reference that I found on the Web (http://tinyurl.com/27uz2o).

As I see it, the idea is to get the customers right where you want them by using language that "catches". It's positive for the marketing people, but not necessarily for the customers.






Example sentence(s):
  • "You rope people in by giving them what they want--from the cover through to the end." (referring to a magazine).
Paul Cohen
Greenland
Local time: 13:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 75

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bernhard Sulzer: yes, I thought of "einwickeln/verwickeln" as well. It's just that to suggest the use of "Stacheldrahtwörter" seems a rather cruel "positive" concept. Stacheldraht will do more than catch people, it'll hurt them. :-)
9 mins
  -> One would think so. Indeed, this begs the question why it falls under the category "language to be used in customer talks"!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
barbed wire words


Explanation:
words that make one not want to communicate or rather reject something ("you must buy this" instead of "let me show you how this could be advantageous for you") - the sources I found are all "negative."

http://www.salestraining.de/verkaufswissen2/foer_6.htm

Worte wie "wollen, sollen oder müssen" klingen fast immer negativ. Erfolgreiche Verkäufer vermeiden sog. negativ besetzte Wörter und sprechen in diesem Zusammenhang auch von "Stacheldrahtwörtern", weil diese Wörter ein "Näherkommen" verhindern können. Denken Sie auch immer daran, wie Sie selbst reagieren, wenn Sie jemand anspricht.

http://www.atimetolovemag.com/puttinglovetothetest/74

http://20six.co.uk/cigarette-sigh/art/105784
http://alien-dream.blogspot.com/2007/09/tomorrow-i-will.html
barbed wire words


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2008-01-18 02:56:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

a few more thoughts:

I guess one could suggest to use certain sharp, pushy words that catch, entangle, rope people in, but the picture I get from "Stacheldrahtwörter" is that of the costumer being "trapped", like an animal, ...
It seems to be at least a very negative name for/way of describing that kind of language, even if it's just for the training of sales people.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2008-01-18 03:27:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

...and if one thinks of those words as catchy, sweet ones, even with the "salespeople's" idea of catching, trapping the customer, reeling him in, the term "Stacheldrahtwörter" seems very far fetched at best.


Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 11:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 45
Grading comment
Da der Kunde auf meine Rückfrage nicht reagiert hat, ich die Übersetzung aber gestern abliefern sollte, habe ich mich schlussendlich für die wörtliche Variante entschieden, um allen Interpretationen aus dem Weg zu gehen. Danke an alle für die Vorschläge und Anregungen.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nicole Schnell
25 mins
  -> danke, Nicole!

agree  Patricia Will: What about "barbed wire language" rather than words?
6 hrs
  -> thank you, Patricia. if it's not used to describe specific words only, yes. But I guess the bigger question seems to be: can this be used to talk to costumers/talk them into something or is it something not to be used? Paul's link is interesting.
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