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Steinergänzungsmaterial

English translation: stone substitute (material)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Steinergänzungsmaterial
English translation:stone substitute (material)
Entered by: David Williams
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09:26 Aug 29, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Materials (Plastics, Ceramics, etc.) / archaeology/restoration
German term or phrase: Steinergänzungsmaterial
Talking about restoring statues etc. using scientific methods such as SEM and EDX to determine the best materials to use to reinforce the stone.
David Williams
Germany
Local time: 13:30
stone substitute (material)
Explanation:
A while ago I translated the abstract of a diploma thesis for a conservator friend of mine, and the term we hit upon for *Ergänzungsmaterial* (for plaster) was *substitute material*. This also conveys the *Imitat* aspect since it describes replacement that is not in kind.

*Substitute material should convey the same form, design, and overall visual appearance as the historic feature.*
http://www.nps.gov/hps/TPS/standguide/restore/restore_strucs...

To substantiate my answer I can offer the following quote from a published article on stone restoration (not available online, but can send to you via email on request):

Treatments of sculptural and architectural stonework from both interior and exterior environments are discussed, following an outline of criteria to be considered when choosing a fill material. An overview of current practice is divided into two main approaches: replacement with a stone or **stone substitute** and plastic repairs.
(Griswold and Uricheck 1998, *Loss Compensation Methods for Stone*, p. 89)

But, depending on where and how the material is applied, it could also be translated as *fill material* (as above) or *patching material*.
Selected response from:

xxxhollstes
Germany
Local time: 13:30
Grading comment
Thank you! It was a close thing, as consolidant is evidently also used and is presumably more or less the same, but since this is closer to the German it seems best in the given context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4stone replenishment materialSubbanna
3stone substitute (material)xxxhollstes
3consolidant
Helen Shiner


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
consolidant


Explanation:
Guidelines from a conservator. Hopefully something here will help.

"Stone can lose its cohesive strength when the material that binds the grains together becomes disrupted or lost through dissolution. In such a situation, the stone is described as “sugary,” because the individual grains or crystals become easily dislodged and have the appearance of loose sugar granules. The stone may begin to delaminate in flakelike sections. In such cases, the cohesive and structural strength of the stone must be reinstated by the introduction of a consolidant. The characteristics of good stone consolidants include long-term stability and strength under adverse conditions (outdoors), the ability to penetrate deeply into the stone and provide even distribution of the final consolidating product throughout the stone, and a minimal effect upon the appearance of the stone once it is introduced (i.e., it should not change the colour or other characteristics such as translucency or opacity of the stone).

Consolidants can be divided into two major categories: mineral and synthetic consolidants. Among the mineral consolidants are “lime water,” which is the introduction of a saturated water solution of calcium hydroxide into the matrix of a calcium-based stone (such as limestone or marble). Once the calcium hydroxide is deposited, its eventual interaction with atmospheric carbon dioxide forms a network of calcium carbonate, similar to that which makes up the stone itself. In a similar manner, the application of alkoxy silanes in recent decades offers the conservator a method by which amorphous silica can be introduced as a binder and strengthener for deteriorated sandstone. Some silanes will also impart water repellency to the stone. Synthetic polymer-based consolidants include acrylic polymers, epoxies, and polyesters. Although these are a considerable improvement over past materials such as wax and natural resins, some have proved unsuitable in certain environments and over long periods of exposure. Some epoxies have altered over a relatively short period of time and dramatically changed the appearance of the sculpture, while other synthetic consolidants have proved unable to penetrate deeply enough into the stone, and their application has resulted in a thin, dense, and impermeable crust that falls away owing to the buildup of salts or water vapour behind it."
http://www.britannica.com/oscar/print?articleId=111003&fullA...

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many thanks, that sounds very promising, and the link is very interesting indeed!

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
stone replenishment material


Explanation:
for conservation and restoration


    links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0044-9466(1985)17%3A2%3C15%3ACARONS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B -
Subbanna
India
Local time: 07:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 15
Notes to answerer
Asker: Sorry, but I'm not convinced by this, can you provide any more substantiation?

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
stone substitute (material)


Explanation:
A while ago I translated the abstract of a diploma thesis for a conservator friend of mine, and the term we hit upon for *Ergänzungsmaterial* (for plaster) was *substitute material*. This also conveys the *Imitat* aspect since it describes replacement that is not in kind.

*Substitute material should convey the same form, design, and overall visual appearance as the historic feature.*
http://www.nps.gov/hps/TPS/standguide/restore/restore_strucs...

To substantiate my answer I can offer the following quote from a published article on stone restoration (not available online, but can send to you via email on request):

Treatments of sculptural and architectural stonework from both interior and exterior environments are discussed, following an outline of criteria to be considered when choosing a fill material. An overview of current practice is divided into two main approaches: replacement with a stone or **stone substitute** and plastic repairs.
(Griswold and Uricheck 1998, *Loss Compensation Methods for Stone*, p. 89)

But, depending on where and how the material is applied, it could also be translated as *fill material* (as above) or *patching material*.

xxxhollstes
Germany
Local time: 13:30
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you! It was a close thing, as consolidant is evidently also used and is presumably more or less the same, but since this is closer to the German it seems best in the given context.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, that sounds very good too. Thanks!

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Aug 29, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)Science (general) » Materials (Plastics, Ceramics, etc.)


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