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Rezidivierende depressive Störung

English translation: recurrent depressive disorder

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19:15 Mar 27, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / report for insurance purposes
German term or phrase: Rezidivierende depressive Störung
In a medical document giving a diagnosis of a patient.
sftyler
Local time: 02:19
English translation:recurrent depressive disorder
Explanation:
.
Selected response from:

xxxgenaa
Local time: 03:19
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5recurrent depressive disorderxxxgenaa
4 +4Recurring depression
Trudy Peters
5recurrent depressive disorder
Dr Janine Manuel BSc BHB MBChB
4 -1chronic depressionDeb Phillips


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Recurring depression


Explanation:
...

Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 21:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 147

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
15 mins

agree  GreenTara: depression is considered a "mood disorder", therefore I would keep it simple and translate the German as above, rather than more literally by including the word "disorder"
4 hrs

agree  Deb Phillips: suffers from recurring depression
5 hrs

agree  jkjones: recurrent depressive disorder
15 hrs
  -> Yes, recurrent is better
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
recurrent depressive disorder


Explanation:
.

xxxgenaa
Local time: 03:19
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
5 mins

agree  ingot
59 mins

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
4 hrs

agree  Deb Phillips: recurrent depressive illness. recurrent depressive syndrome.
7 hrs

agree  hph: if they meant just depression, they would have written "Depression" , if they meant "chronic" they would have written "chronisch", if "syndrome" - "Syndrom"! - That easy!
1 day1 hr
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
chronic depression


Explanation:
chronic depression

Störung to my mind is a disturbance. But the dictionary also gives disorder, when referring to medical diagnosis.

chronic depression disorder




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Note added at 2002-03-27 19:45:13 (GMT)
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chronic depression syndrome

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Note added at 2002-03-27 19:53:34 (GMT)
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relapsing depressive illness

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Note added at 2002-03-28 01:28:45 (GMT)
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clinical depression - more soon -
checking web

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Note added at 2002-03-28 03:12:42 (GMT)
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http://www.have-a-heart.com/self-help-v.html
Chronic Depression (Ongoing or reoccurring depression which is extremely resistive to treatment)

http://www.couns.uiuc.edu/Brochures/Depression.htm
A period of depressed mood which lasts for several days or a few weeks is a normal part of life and is not necessarily a cause for concern. Although these feelings are often referred to as \"depression,\" they typically do not constitute a clinical depression because the symptoms are relatively mild and of short duration. Moreover, milder periods of depression are often related to stressful life events and improve-ment frequently coincides with positive life changes. A person experiencing a clinical depression, however, will likely be experiencing substantial changes in their mood, thinking, behaviors, activities and self-perceptions.

http://www.focusondepression.com/Script/Main/art.asp?li=MNI&...
A depressive disorder is a syndrome (group of symptoms) that reflects a sad mood exceeding normal sadness or grief. Depression is diagnosed only clinically in that there is no laboratory test or x-ray for depression. Depressive disorders have been with man since the beginning of recorded history. In the Bible, King David, as well as Job, suffered from this affliction. Hippocrates referred to depression as melancholia, which literally means black bile. Black bile, along with blood, phlegm, and yellow bile were the four humors (fluids) that accounted for the basic medical physiology of that time. Depression has been portrayed in literature and the arts for hundreds of years, but what do we mean today when we refer to a depressive disorder? In the nineteenth century, depression was seen as an inherited weakness of temperament. In the first half of the twentieth century, Freud linked the development (pathogenesis) of depression to guilt and conflict.
Nothing in the universe is as complex and fascinating as the human brain. The over 100 chemicals that circulate in the brain are known as neurochemicals or neurotransmitters. Much of our research and knowledge, however, has focused on four of these neurochemical systems: norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and acetycholine.
In the new millennium, after new discoveries are made, it is possible that these four neurochemicals will be viewed as the “black bile, yellow bile, phlegm, and blood” of the twentieth century. Different neuropsychiatric illnesses seem to be associated with an over-abundance or a lack of some of these neurochemicals in certain parts of the brain. For example, a lack of dopamine at the base of the brain causes Parkinson disease. Alzheimer dementia seems to be related to lower acetylcholine levels in the brain. The addictive disorders are under the influence of the neurochemical dopamine. That is to say, drugs and alcohol work by releasing dopamine in the brain. The dopamine causes euphoria, which is a pleasant sensation. Repeated use of drugs or alcohol, however, desensitizes the dopamine system, which means that the system gets used to the drugs and alcohol. Therefore, a person needs more drugs or alcohol to achieve the same high feeling. The different types of schizophrenia are associated with an imbalance of dopamine (too much) and serotonin (poorly regulated) in certain areas of the brain. Finally, the depressive disorders appear to be associated with altered brain serotonin and norepinephrine systems. The most powerful treatment for depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is certainly not specific to any particular neurotransmitter system. Rather, ECT, by causing a seizure, produces a generalized brain activity that probably releases massive amounts of all of the neurochemicals. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are medications that increase the amount of the neurochemical serotonin in the brain. (Remember that brain serotonin levels are low in depression.) As their name implies, the SSRIs work by selectively inhibiting (blocking) serotonin reuptake in the brain. This block occurs at the synapse, the place where brain cells (neurons) are connected to each other. Serotonin is one of the chemicals in the brain that carries messages across these connections (synapses) from one neuron to another. The SSRIs work by keeping the serotonin present in high concentrations in the synapses. These drugs do this by preventing the reuptake of serotonin back into the sending nerve cell. The reuptake of serotonin is responsible for turning off the production of new serotonin. Therefore, the serotonin message keeps on coming through. This, in turn, helps arouse (activate) cells that have been deactivated by depression, and relieves the depressed person’s symptoms.
Dual Action Antidepressants: The biochemical reality is that all classes of medications that treat depression (MAOIs, SSRIs, TCAs, and atypical antidepressants) have some effect on both norepinephrine and serotonin, as well as on other neurotransmitters. However, the various medications affect the different neurotransmitters in varying degrees. Another newer antidepressant, mirtazapine (Remeron), is a tetracyclic compound (four-ring chemical structure). It works at somewhat different biochemical sites and in different ways than the other drugs. It affects serotonin, but at a post-synaptic site (after the connection between nerve cells.) It also increases histamine levels, which can cause drowsiness. For this reason, mirtazapine is given at bedtime and is often prescribed for people who have trouble falling asleep. Like venlafaxine, it also works by increasing levels in the norepinephrine system.
Atypical antidepressants are so named because they work in a variety of ways. Thus, atypical antidepressants are not TCAs or SSRIs, but they act like them. More specifically, they increase the level of certain neurochemicals in the brain synapses (where nerves communicate with each other).
Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are the earliest developed antidepressants. MAOIs elevate the levels of neurochemicals in the brain synapses by inhibiting monoamine oxidase. Monoamine oxidase is the main enzyme that breaks down neurochemicals, such as norepinephrine. When monoamine oxidase is inhibited, the norepinephrine is not broken down and, therefore, the amount of norepinephrine in the brain is increased. MAOIs also impair the ability to break down tyramine, a substance found in aged cheese, wines, most nuts, chocolate, and some other foods. Tyramine, like norepinephrine, can elevate blood pressure. Therefore, the consump-tion of tyramine-containing foods by a patient taking an MAOI drug can cause elevated blood levels of tyramine and dangerously high blood pressure. In addition, MAOIs can interact with over-the-counter cold and cough medications to cause dangerously high blood pressures. The reason for this is that these cold and cough medications often contain drugs that likewise can increase blood pressure. If the depressed person is taking more than one drug for depression or drugs for any other medical problem, all of the patient’s doctors should be made aware of the other prescriptions. Many of these medications are cleared from the body (metabolized) in the liver. This means that the multiple drugs can interact competitively with the liver’s biochemical clearing systems. Therefore, the actual blood levels of the drugs may be higher or lower than would be expected from the dosage.





Deb Phillips

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  GreenTara: to me "chronic" implies "uninterrupted"
4 hrs
  -> I think that may be true. My answer may be incorrect.
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
recurrent depressive disorder


Explanation:
recurrent is the correct term here not recurring or chronic. Chronic does suggest an uninterrupted course and we simply don't say recurring.
Ref-medical doctor

Dr Janine Manuel BSc BHB MBChB
New Zealand
Local time: 13:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 106
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Changes made by editors
Sep 15, 2011 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)(none) » Medical (general)


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