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Haemoglobinopathie

English translation: haemoglobinopathy

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Haemoglobinopathie
English translation:haemoglobinopathy
Entered by: Anita Menhofer
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05:41 Aug 13, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical
German term or phrase: Haemoglobinopathie
must be some rare condition showing in blood tests, i.e. hemoglobin results
Anita Menhofer
haemoglobinpathy (UK); hemoglobinpathy (US)
Explanation:
Not many hits for these terms, but then the German word gets none at all. So it's not a very common expression in either language. I believe this would be the right translation.

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Note added at 2002-08-13 06:03:34 (GMT)
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Hmm, spelling the word right in the first place would make searching for it a bit easier! It is of course haemoglobinOpathy!

My translation (with the correct spelling!) is confirmed by the Roche Lexikon Medizin. So it\'s haemoglobinopathy if this is a UK text, or hemoglobinopathy if it\'s a US text.

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Note added at 2002-08-13 06:06:11 (GMT)
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861 Yahoo hits for the British version of the word (when I spell it right!) So it definitely IS a common expression.
Selected response from:

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 04:08
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5haemoglobinpathy (UK); hemoglobinpathy (US)Rowan Morrell
5 +1haemoglobinopathyopedos


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
haemoglobinpathy (UK); hemoglobinpathy (US)


Explanation:
Not many hits for these terms, but then the German word gets none at all. So it's not a very common expression in either language. I believe this would be the right translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-13 06:03:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hmm, spelling the word right in the first place would make searching for it a bit easier! It is of course haemoglobinOpathy!

My translation (with the correct spelling!) is confirmed by the Roche Lexikon Medizin. So it\'s haemoglobinopathy if this is a UK text, or hemoglobinopathy if it\'s a US text.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-13 06:06:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

861 Yahoo hits for the British version of the word (when I spell it right!) So it definitely IS a common expression.

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 04:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1459

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elisabeth Ghysels
0 min

agree  Yoshiro Shibasaki, PhD
6 mins

agree  Piotr Kurek
49 mins

agree  opedos
2 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
haemoglobinopathy


Explanation:
this is the correct spelling!


    Reference: http://www.medscape.com/px/mscpsearch?fromtemp=Clinical&Quer...
opedos
Local time: 19:08
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowan Morrell: That it's the correct UK spelling. KBtrans has given the correct US spelling. I have amended my initial spelling error.
1 hr
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