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defizitäre knöcherne Lagerverhältnisse

English translation: deficient osseous foundation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:defizitäre knöcherne Lagerverhältnisse
English translation:deficient osseous foundation
Entered by: Rowan Morrell
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04:48 Jan 22, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical / Dental Implantology
German term or phrase: defizitäre knöcherne Lagerverhältnisse
"F88
Fazit:
Die Erfahrungen bei der Periimplantitistherapie konnten 1:1 übernommen werden für Konzepte zur präimplantologischen Augmentation defizitärer knöcherner Lagerverhältnisse."

Happy New Year everyone! Here's my first question of 2004. It's from a funny sort of text that seems to just be a string of short excerpts from some text or other about implants and - would you believe - explants!

Anyway, I really don't understand the phrase at the end of the sentence. My current guess at its meaning is "deficient bone position relationships". But I really don't know. Hopefully there will be someone here who does. TIA for your help.

Oh, just before I close, any idea what the "F88" might be? All the excerpts seem to be headed up with things like F 8, F 41, F 85 etc., and I'm completely stumped as to what the "F" stands for. So if anyone could answer that as well, that would be great! However, my main concern is sorting out the meaning of the phrase I'm inquiring about.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 19:09
deficient osseous foundation
Explanation:
...or something to that effect. I think it's the Verhältnisse = relationships that misled you - Verhältnisse here has the meaning of situation, and you can just leave it out altogether. One of those overprecise German words. In fact, the whole phrase is just a tad convoluted. :-)

A Knochenlager in dental implantology is "osseous foundation". What the sentence is saying is that some bone augmentation may be required if the osseous foundation is not strong enough (or thick enough) to support an implant.

I know it's frowned upon to simply quote "professional experience" as a reference, but I'm afraid that's exactly what it is; as you may recall (I have mentioned this before), I did some interpreting work for an international conference on dental implants and implantology, and I have the corresponding glossaries that were compiled by myself as well as other colleagues who have worked with this particular client, a Swiss manufacturer of implants, for many years. The term "osseous foundation" comes from that glossary.

Nothing yet on the F... I'll post an addition if I find anything.

And happy New Year to you, too! May it be prosperous and successful!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-01-22 05:01:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just looked at your question again - could the F stand for Folie (as in a PowerPoint slide)?
Selected response from:

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 00:09
Grading comment
Thank you for your very thorough answer, Ulrike. 4 points well earned here! I always thought Knochenlager was bone bed, though, but "osseous foundation" sounds pretty good. I also think you're probably right with F standing for "Folie", so will translate that as "slide".

That glossary of yours has bailed me out on at least one previous occasion. Would you be willing to sell me a copy? I think it has a few terms the Bucksch dictionary doesn't have. If so, please contact me privately. Thank you once again for your help - much appreciated.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4deficient osseous foundationUlrike Lieder


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
defizitäre knöcherne Lagerverhältnisse
deficient osseous foundation


Explanation:
...or something to that effect. I think it's the Verhältnisse = relationships that misled you - Verhältnisse here has the meaning of situation, and you can just leave it out altogether. One of those overprecise German words. In fact, the whole phrase is just a tad convoluted. :-)

A Knochenlager in dental implantology is "osseous foundation". What the sentence is saying is that some bone augmentation may be required if the osseous foundation is not strong enough (or thick enough) to support an implant.

I know it's frowned upon to simply quote "professional experience" as a reference, but I'm afraid that's exactly what it is; as you may recall (I have mentioned this before), I did some interpreting work for an international conference on dental implants and implantology, and I have the corresponding glossaries that were compiled by myself as well as other colleagues who have worked with this particular client, a Swiss manufacturer of implants, for many years. The term "osseous foundation" comes from that glossary.

Nothing yet on the F... I'll post an addition if I find anything.

And happy New Year to you, too! May it be prosperous and successful!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-01-22 05:01:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just looked at your question again - could the F stand for Folie (as in a PowerPoint slide)?

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 00:09
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
Grading comment
Thank you for your very thorough answer, Ulrike. 4 points well earned here! I always thought Knochenlager was bone bed, though, but "osseous foundation" sounds pretty good. I also think you're probably right with F standing for "Folie", so will translate that as "slide".

That glossary of yours has bailed me out on at least one previous occasion. Would you be willing to sell me a copy? I think it has a few terms the Bucksch dictionary doesn't have. If so, please contact me privately. Thank you once again for your help - much appreciated.
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