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Dystelektase

English translation: poorly aerated

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16:06 Feb 18, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
German term or phrase: Dystelektase
X-ray lung finding. Roche offers this definition:

Vermindeter Luftgehalt eines Lungenbereichs als Vorstude einer Atelektase, eines Lungenkollapses.

Atelektase becomes Atelectasis, but the same does not seem to happen with Dystelektase. I am looking for the correct English term and a good reference.

Of 19 pubmed hits for Dystelectasis, 17 are by Germans or in German, 1 Hungarian and 1 Russian. "Dystelectasia" occurs 3 times, in German, Italian and Russian.
Ford Prefect
Burkina Faso
Local time: 00:45
English translation:poorly aerated
Explanation:
As you have astutely noted, James, English speakers don't use the term "dystelectasis/ia". Being a stage before complete collapse (atelectasis), an X-ray report might note a "poorly aerated/inflated zone", "increased density" or "decreased lucency".

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-02-18 17:19:25 GMT)
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http://www.sub.uni-hamburg.de/opus/volltexte/2003/921/pdf/di...

Dystelektase: Radiologisch subsegmentalen bronchialen Minderbelüftungen entsprechend, ohne wesentliche Beeinträchtigung des Gasaustausches

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-02-18 19:43:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another possibility could be "minimal atelectasis":

Atelectasis and pulmonary function
Certainly, exposing a patient to oxygen concentrations near 100%—for as long as several days, for example—can cause direct pulmonary toxicity. But there's no evidence that that's the case for a patient receiving a high concentration of oxygen during a surgical procedure. While it only takes a few breaths of 100% oxygen for atelectasis—or a partially collapsed lung—to develop, fortunately, the condition is just as easily reversed with a single sustained positive-pressure breath.14,15 More importantly, only a small percentage of lung volume is usually atelectatic after surgery.

We recently compared two groups of patients: one group received 30% oxygen and the other 80% oxygen during and for 2 hours after surgery. On the first postoperative day, pulmonary function, assessed as oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial differences in oxygen, was identical in the two groups and the amount of atelectasis was also similar. We found that 80% oxygen given during and for a short period after surgery does not cause atelectasis or impair pulmonary function.16 Recently, Edmark and colleagues confirmed these results by showing that 80% inspired oxygen caused minimal atelectasis whereas a 100% dose provoked atelectasis.17

http://amga.mediwire.com/main/Default.aspx?P=Content&Article...

Selected response from:

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 02:45
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2dystelectasis
Eugenia Lourenco
4 +2(partial) atelectasis
Anne Schulz
5dystelectasia
celiacp
3 +1poorly aeratedDr Sue Levy
2 -1dysthymic ectasis
Stephen Sadie


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
dystelectasis


Explanation:
Source: Eurodicautom

Eugenia Lourenco
Portugal
Local time: 01:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kk ll
0 min
  -> Thanks, Anne-Barbara!

agree  Cetacea
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Cetacea!

neutral  MMUlr: No, I would not select an English medical term or decide on its use based on Eurodicautom.
18 hrs
  -> So, would you say my answer is wrong? Is it not dystelectasis?
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
dysthymic ectasis


Explanation:
.. Rubarth's disease virus am plus ectasia, ectasis either yourself ... fossa no his malt-worker’s lung this deep ... own bowenoid papulosis up far dysthymic enough the ...
health-d.med9.com/deformity.htm - Zusätzliches Ergebnis - Ähnliche Seiten

English-German: galeropsia - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... together Sachs everybody on ectasia, ectasis am neither ... isthmus if his chronic obstructive lung disease off ... rhinaria nowhere within dysthymic, that few May ...
health-g.med9.com/galeropsia.htm - Zusätzliches Ergebnis - Ähnliche Seiten

Stephen Sadie
Germany
Local time: 02:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 69

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  MMUlr: Sorry, but dysthymic is a term used in psychiatry - Gemütskrankheiten --> Depression (see http://www.drwoolard.com/exer338/disabling_conditions_define... )
18 hrs
  -> no problem, I was clearly wrong
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
dystelectasia


Explanation:
good luck!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2006-02-18 16:28:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PubMed is probably the most reliable Medical DataBase.



The most frequent complications were pleural (7/16) with reactive effusion and bronchopulmonary with basal dystelectasia (3 cases) and bronchopneumonic foci ...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve& db=PubMed&list_uids=8469360&dopt=Abstract - Páginas similares


[Combination of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis with skin ... - [ Traduzca esta página ]Large cysts, dystelectasia, fibrosis and smooth muscle proliferation were found in the lungs. The characteristic feature of smooth muscle cells was their ...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve& db=PubMed&list_uids=11810925&dopt=Abstract - Páginas similares




celiacp
Spain
Local time: 02:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  MMUlr: Sorry, but Medline cannot prevent Non-English native authors from incorrect use of terms in English.
18 hrs
  -> thanks for your comment
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
poorly aerated


Explanation:
As you have astutely noted, James, English speakers don't use the term "dystelectasis/ia". Being a stage before complete collapse (atelectasis), an X-ray report might note a "poorly aerated/inflated zone", "increased density" or "decreased lucency".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-02-18 17:19:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.sub.uni-hamburg.de/opus/volltexte/2003/921/pdf/di...

Dystelektase: Radiologisch subsegmentalen bronchialen Minderbelüftungen entsprechend, ohne wesentliche Beeinträchtigung des Gasaustausches

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-02-18 19:43:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another possibility could be "minimal atelectasis":

Atelectasis and pulmonary function
Certainly, exposing a patient to oxygen concentrations near 100%—for as long as several days, for example—can cause direct pulmonary toxicity. But there's no evidence that that's the case for a patient receiving a high concentration of oxygen during a surgical procedure. While it only takes a few breaths of 100% oxygen for atelectasis—or a partially collapsed lung—to develop, fortunately, the condition is just as easily reversed with a single sustained positive-pressure breath.14,15 More importantly, only a small percentage of lung volume is usually atelectatic after surgery.

We recently compared two groups of patients: one group received 30% oxygen and the other 80% oxygen during and for 2 hours after surgery. On the first postoperative day, pulmonary function, assessed as oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial differences in oxygen, was identical in the two groups and the amount of atelectasis was also similar. We found that 80% oxygen given during and for a short period after surgery does not cause atelectasis or impair pulmonary function.16 Recently, Edmark and colleagues confirmed these results by showing that 80% inspired oxygen caused minimal atelectasis whereas a 100% dose provoked atelectasis.17

http://amga.mediwire.com/main/Default.aspx?P=Content&Article...



Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 02:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 412
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anne Schulz: Definitely a good option to go with a clear description rather than an ambiguous term proper in an x-ray report.
19 hrs
  -> thanks Anne!
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(partial) atelectasis


Explanation:
The use of "atelectasis" differs between the English and German languages. While "Atelektase" denotes a non-expanded region of the lung, and "Dystelektase" a partial loss of lung expansion, "atelectasis" is used for any decrease in lung expansion.
Sometimes, "partial atelectasis" is distinguished from "complete atelectasis", however, this distinction is not well defined, as "partial atelectasis" may refer to complete deaeration of part(s) of a given lung region as well as partial deaeration of all of a given lung region.


    Reference: http://www.emedicine.com/med/byname/atelectasis.htm
Anne Schulz
Germany
Local time: 02:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 1501

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr Sue Levy: yes that's a good solution - I still like minimal atelectasis though ;-)//You could be right there re the area .
9 hrs
  -> Right, you had the atelectasis part in your answer which I didn't read all through the end - sorry! Not sure about "minimal" though; it does seem to denote the area rather than the degree; see e.g. http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/91/1/61.

agree  MMUlr: or complete - incomplete atelectasis ...//Partial is even better, see http://www.egja.org/current/2005_jul_4.pdf and search (Scholar Google) incomplete partial atelectasis (any of the terms)
12 hrs
  -> Danke für die Unterstützung!
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