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Überstrahlungsartefakte

English translation: beam hardening artefacts

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Überstrahlungsartefakte
English translation:beam hardening artefacts
Entered by: Ford Prefect
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12:13 Feb 19, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / CT
German term or phrase: Überstrahlungsartefakte
Resulting in a degraded CT of an obese patient with ascites.

Just one document that I can find on the web - page 37 of http://www.medical.philips.com/de/assets/docs/medica_mundi/m...

Any ideas?
Ford Prefect
Burkina Faso
Local time: 14:33
overbeaming (artifacts)
Explanation:
Also used in a Philips source (see below).
It appears like "Überstrahlung" had more than one meaning in computertomography though ("Dosisüberstrahlung" = too much exposure in general, vs. "Detektorüberstrahlung" = a detector receives signals from neighbouring slices). "Overbeaming" refers to the latter, while Kevin's suggestion, "overexposure", may be appropriate for the former.

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Note added at 7 hrs (2006-02-19 19:15:18 GMT)
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In response to your note: The "out of field" artifact is different from "Überstrahlung", I would think - though it's very likely that "out of field" artifacts may also have ocurred in such a big patient :-)

Actually, I think I need to withdraw the suggestion of "overbeaming artifacts" as, on second look, overbeaming appears to be rather a technique for avoiding the kind of artifacts I was thinking of.
For "Überstrahlungsartefakt" in the sense that an extremely dense object (such as metal or calcified lesions) appears larger than its actual size, I found "blooming artifact" - maybe an option if your text deals with diagnosis of atherosclerosis, or if this patient had any kind of metal implants, stents, etc.

Sorry about the confusion!
Selected response from:

Anne Schulz
Germany
Local time: 16:33
Grading comment
thanks - this is apparently, according to another source, related to absorption by dense objects.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1overbeaming (artifacts)
Anne Schulz
4overexposure artifacts
KSL Berlin


  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Überstrahlungsartefakte
overexposure artifacts


Explanation:
"Überstrahlung" is usually simply "overexposure" (Pucher: Dictionary of Medical Imaging, etc.), and a number of photographic / imaging contexts discuss artifacts resulting from overexposure.

KSL Berlin
Portugal
Local time: 15:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Überstrahlungsartefakte
overbeaming (artifacts)


Explanation:
Also used in a Philips source (see below).
It appears like "Überstrahlung" had more than one meaning in computertomography though ("Dosisüberstrahlung" = too much exposure in general, vs. "Detektorüberstrahlung" = a detector receives signals from neighbouring slices). "Overbeaming" refers to the latter, while Kevin's suggestion, "overexposure", may be appropriate for the former.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2006-02-19 19:15:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In response to your note: The "out of field" artifact is different from "Überstrahlung", I would think - though it's very likely that "out of field" artifacts may also have ocurred in such a big patient :-)

Actually, I think I need to withdraw the suggestion of "overbeaming artifacts" as, on second look, overbeaming appears to be rather a technique for avoiding the kind of artifacts I was thinking of.
For "Überstrahlungsartefakt" in the sense that an extremely dense object (such as metal or calcified lesions) appears larger than its actual size, I found "blooming artifact" - maybe an option if your text deals with diagnosis of atherosclerosis, or if this patient had any kind of metal implants, stents, etc.

Sorry about the confusion!


    Reference: http://www.medical.philips.com/in/news/assets/docs/medicamun...
Anne Schulz
Germany
Local time: 16:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 1501
Grading comment
thanks - this is apparently, according to another source, related to absorption by dense objects.
Notes to answerer
Asker: My initial thought was an "out of field" artifact - the patient is massively obese and also has ascites related to liver failure. Do you think there is any sense in this?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KSL Berlin: An alternative term in this sense would be "overframing", but your suggestion is more common. It also seems to be more likely than my proposal just based on the frequency with which it comes up in CT literature.
5 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Feb 19, 2006 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
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