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Überdachung

English translation: femoral head covering / coverage

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Überdachung
English translation:femoral head covering / coverage
Entered by: Christine Lam
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20:04 Feb 14, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
German term or phrase: Überdachung
Patient mit Coxarthrose
Die bisherigen Meinungen zur Diagnose sind diametral verschieden, von Dysplasie bis Überdachung. Ebenso divergieren die Behandlungsvorschläge, von Warten bis Prothese notwendig.
Christine Lam
Local time: 05:57
covering
Explanation:
Not sure.. but this seems to me to be a possblity...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2007-02-14 20:41:09 GMT)
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Severe osteoarthritis due to acetabular dysplasia (n = 17) was treated with valgus-extension osteotomy, and the patients' clinical outcomes 10-14 years after operation were evaluated according to clinical factors (Japanese Orthopaedic Association hip score; JOA score) and by roentgenography. The mean JOA score 10 years or later had improved by 22 points compared with the preoperative score. On roentgenography, joints which had preoperative roof osteophyte had better postoperative formation of roof osteophyte. The JOA score was higher in the 12 joints which had osteophyte 5 mm or longer than in those joints with osteophyte that was 5 mm or shorter. Postoperative joint space widening occurred in 15 joints (88.2%) 3-6 months postoperatively, and it reached the maximum at 3-5 years. In patients who had a large bone cyst in the femoral head preoperatively, the cyst collapsed, and deformation of femoral head occurred after operation, but remodeling of the joint surface occurred naturally and the congruity improved. In the 6 joints in which the preoperative acetabular head index was less than 60% and the acetabular angle was larger than 30°, the JOA score at 10 years or later was lower than that of the other joints. Based on these findings, valgus-extension osteotomy was evaluated as a useful surgical method for advanced or terminal osteoarthritis in young or middle-aged patients. Predictive factors for long-term prognosis would be the preoperative length of roof osteophyte, joint space widening, and the degree of ** femoral head covering. **
Selected response from:

Zareh Darakjian Ph.D.
United States
Local time: 02:57
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4Containment
Gisela Greenlee
2 +1coveringZareh Darakjian Ph.D.


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
covering


Explanation:
Not sure.. but this seems to me to be a possblity...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2007-02-14 20:41:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Severe osteoarthritis due to acetabular dysplasia (n = 17) was treated with valgus-extension osteotomy, and the patients' clinical outcomes 10-14 years after operation were evaluated according to clinical factors (Japanese Orthopaedic Association hip score; JOA score) and by roentgenography. The mean JOA score 10 years or later had improved by 22 points compared with the preoperative score. On roentgenography, joints which had preoperative roof osteophyte had better postoperative formation of roof osteophyte. The JOA score was higher in the 12 joints which had osteophyte 5 mm or longer than in those joints with osteophyte that was 5 mm or shorter. Postoperative joint space widening occurred in 15 joints (88.2%) 3-6 months postoperatively, and it reached the maximum at 3-5 years. In patients who had a large bone cyst in the femoral head preoperatively, the cyst collapsed, and deformation of femoral head occurred after operation, but remodeling of the joint surface occurred naturally and the congruity improved. In the 6 joints in which the preoperative acetabular head index was less than 60% and the acetabular angle was larger than 30°, the JOA score at 10 years or later was lower than that of the other joints. Based on these findings, valgus-extension osteotomy was evaluated as a useful surgical method for advanced or terminal osteoarthritis in young or middle-aged patients. Predictive factors for long-term prognosis would be the preoperative length of roof osteophyte, joint space widening, and the degree of ** femoral head covering. **


    Reference: http://www.springerlink.com/content/jljf29knvjv1vdbc/
Zareh Darakjian Ph.D.
United States
Local time: 02:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ArmenianArmenian
PRO pts in category: 377
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr Sue Levy: or coverage - see my note above - hi Zareh :-)
14 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, Sue .. and also for the very clear explanation. I keep learning...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Containment


Explanation:
remodeling. of the dysplastic. acetabulum. The. acetabular. roof should ... of the hip and containment. of the. femoral. head. in the acetabulum. ...

www.ajronline.org/cgi/reprint/164/5/1067.pdf

http://www.lifebridgehealth.org/sinaibody.cfm?id=1529

Perthes disease is a childhood form of avascular necrosis of the hip. For reasons yet unknown, the head of the femur (ball of the hip) loses part or all of its blood circulation. Like any tissue that loses circulation, the bone of the hip dies. The normal reaction of the body to dead tissue is to remove it and replace it with living tissue. Gradually, the dead bone of the femoral head is removed by special cells in the bone called osteoclasts. At the same time, new bone is added by special cells called osteoblasts. If this demolition and reconstruction occurred in a completely coordinated fashion, there would be no problem. Unfortunately, the removal of bone weakens the femoral head and the bone in the femoral head cartilage (the outer coating of the joint) becomes deformed because of lack of bony support underneath. This is analogous to the removal of the support beams of a building by one construction crew and the subsequent replacement with new support beams the next day by another crew. In the interim, the roof of the building collapses. Fortunately, the cartilage on the outside of the femoral head is alive and able to grow. It has been observed that it is stimulated to grow outside the acetabulum (socket) where there is no load on the hip.

The treatment of Perthes disease is controversial. We know that the older the child is, the worse the prognosis. Most agree that children younger than 6 years do not require surgical treatment or even treatment with a brace. For patients of all ages, the most important concern in the treatment of Perthes disease is to maintain range of motion (ROM) of the hip. The other agreed upon treatment concern is containment. This means getting the femoral head more covered by the socket. Normally, approximately one-third of the diameter of the femoral head is uncovered by the acetabulum. By spreading the legs apart (abduction), the entire femoral head becomes covered by the socket. This is called containment. There are several ways to achieve containment. Nonsurgically, this is done by means of an abduction brace. The brace keeps the legs apart. Surgically, we can achieve the same thing by cutting the bone of the upper femur and bending it in (varus osteotomy) or of the pelvis to reorient the socket. Both of these methods lead to containment of the femoral head. Even with containment, there is a high failure rate, especially in children older than 8 years. In children older than 10 years, these treatments have very poor results.



http://www.ajronline.org/cgi/reprint/164/5/1067.pdf


Gisela Greenlee
Local time: 04:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 1195

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Dr Sue Levy: I had a look at this but it doesn't seem to be used to describe a pathological condition, rather what one hopes to achieve surgically - but perhaps will work here after all. See my note above :-)
26 mins
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