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Stoßhand

English translation: compressing hand

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Stoßhand
English translation:compressing hand
Entered by: David Hollywood
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

13:59 Nov 1, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / First-aid manual
German term or phrase: Stoßhand
We're talking about heart massage here: "Lege die Handballenwurzel der *Stosshand* längs auf die Kompressionsfläche (nicht quer dazu: Gefahr des Zerbrechens des Brustbeins und damit eine schlechtere Füllung von Herz und Lungen)." I know what's meant, but I don't know what to call it. Any help is appreciated ...
Kathinka van de Griendt
Local time: 19:51
compressing hand/hand used for compression
Explanation:
I would say ...

The rationale behind this change was to prevent rib fractures and to keep the compressing hand on the sternum more easily [3]. ...
linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0300957205001589 - Similar pages

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2007-11-01 14:12:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you are alone, ventilate the adult patient with two slow,deep breaths lasting about two seconds each, as described above. Then compress the person's chest in the middle of the sternum 15 times. To find the correct position, first locate the notch or indentation below the sternum, place two fingers above the notch and place your compressing hand above the two fingers. After you have done 15 compressions, ventilate the person with 2 morebreaths. Then provide 15 more compressions. Repeat this four times.If the person is breathing now, monitor closely. If the person is not breathing, continue to ventilate with one breath every 5 to 6 seconds. If there is no pulse or breathing, continue with cardiopulmonaryresuscitation.If there are two people, one can pump the heart 80-100 times a minute while the other ventilates the lungs 12-15 times a minute, or once after every five chest compressions.Chest compression
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Page 7
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 197For cardiopulmonary resuscitation with children, compress thesternum using only one hand at a rate of 80-100 times a minute and ventilate the childonce everyfivecompressions.For infants, use two fingers to compress the chest 100 times a minute andventilate once every5 compressions.Compress the chest over the sternum,one finger breadth(width) below an imaginary line drawn between the infant's nipples.If the heart is beating but the patient's pulse is very weak, raise the patient's legs and begin intravenous fluids. Check the blood pressure. Prepare to begin chest compressions if needed. DUse a drip to ensure that the person is hydrated and prepare to administer ordered drugs.The patient may go into shock if there has been too little blood to thevital organs in the body. The signs of shock are:• anxiety, restlessness or fear• inability to concentrate• fast breathing• thirst, nausea• dilated pupils• pale and cool or cold skinChest compression of infant
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 8
Nursing care of the sick198 \• delayed capillary refilling• increased pulse and decreased blood pressure.If shock progresses, the patient may go into a coma or die from fluid and blood loss.Shock is common in patients experiencing severe injury, severe burns, a severe allergic reaction, drug overdose, poisoning, severe dehydration, sepsis (severe infection in the bloodstream), or amassive heart attack. It is standard practice to give fluids to patients in emergency situations.How to manage shock• Run an intravenous drip rapidly using normal saline,Hartmann's or plasma; use 5% dextrose solution ifnothing else is available. • Lay the person flat and elevate the legs to help venous blood return to the heart and increase blood pressure. Do not move the patient if spinal cord injury is suspected.Clinical alert: Do not raise the legs if the person has congestive heart failure, fluid in the lungs (pulmonary oedema) or severe difficulty breathing (respiratory distress).• Continue the intravenous drip until the patient’s blood pressure is normal.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 9
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 199Clinical alert: Do not give fluid to a head injury patient unless he or she is in shock, because the fluid may increase swelling in the brain (cerebral oedema). Be careful not to give too much fluid to cardiac failure patients or children. Some people suggest delaying fluids for persons with trauma.• Keep the patient warm.• Give oxygen if it is available. • Monitor the patient's airway, breathing and vital signs.How to manage bleedingIf the patient is bleeding, stop thebleeding using a pressure bandage or manual pressure directly over thewound. Pressure will almost always stop the bleeding.Raise the wound above the level of the heart, if possible. If necessary, apply direct pressureover pressure points such as over the main arteries (brachial in the inner arm or femoral in the upper thigh/groin). Sometimes a bleeding artery or vein is clearly visible in the wound. If pressure does not stop the bleeding, you can clamp the blood vessel with an artery forceps. Be extremely careful that you do not clamp a vital structure by mistake.Stop bleeding with pressure dressing
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 10
Nursing care of the sick200 \Clinical alert: Tourniquets are dangerous and should not be used to stop bleeding. The only time you ever use a tourniquet is for a wound of the lower limb where the profuse bleeding is life threatening. In this case, release the tourniquet for a few minutes every half hour.Establish the diagnosis of the patientOnce you have resuscitated the patient and stopped the bleeding, check for the underlying cause of the emergency and begintreatment. Take a brief, focused history and check vital signs.Head and neckCheck the head for wounds or lacerations, drainage from the nose or ears, mouth and jaw injuries.Look for swelling or injury to the neck. Smell the patient's breath for any unusual odour. Continue to monitor vital signs and assess the patient's level of consciousness. Keep an unconscious patient lying on his or her side. If there is injury to the eye, cover the eye with a patch.Check the pupils in both eyes. Normally they are equally round and react when a light is shined in them.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 11
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 201If the nose is bleeding, have the patient sit up if possible and pinch the nose for ten minutes to stop the bleeding. Shoulders and armsCheck the patient's shoulders, arms and hands. Have the person grip your hands and release, if he or she is able to. Check the range of motion of the elbow. If there are fractures, splint them.ChestCheck the patient's chest. The chest should expand equally on both sides when the patient breathes.Look for a sucking chest wound.Listen to breath sounds from both lungs with the stethoscope, and listen to heart sounds. The lung sounds should be equal on both sides. Feel the clavicles, sternum and ribs and ask if this causes pain. If the chest is open, cover the wound with a clean airtight dressing and bandage. If the patient has trouble breathing, untape one edge of the dressing so it acts as a valve. AbdomenAssess the abdomen for distension and injury. If you suspect damage to internal organs, or if the abdomen is very tender or rigid, continue intravenous fluids. Do not give anything by mouth because surgery may be necessary.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 12
Nursing care of the sick202 \SpineIf there is a spine injury, do not move the patient until you have at least three people to assist. The patient's neck and spine and trunk must not bend when he or she is moved. While waiting for help, place your hand gently under the lower curve of the back and feel for any tenderness or deformity. Lower extremitiesExamine and feel (palpate) the pelvic area and bones. Look for any obvious injuries. Examine the legs and feet for deformities, bleeding, bonyprotrusions, swelling or discolouration. Check pulses in feet.Emergency treatmentAfter confirmation of diagnosis, give emergency treatment. If no doctor is available, it may be necessary to arrange for transport of the patient to another health facility.Immediate drug treatment is essential forcertain conditions:The following drugs should be used according to the treatmentschedule (or protocols) established for your health facility.• For convulsions: Diazepam (Valium)• For postpartum haemorrhage: Ergometrine• For asthma: Aminophylline• For narcotic drug overdose: Narcan
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 13
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 203• For patients in severe shock or having an allergicreaction: Intravenous or intramuscular hydrocortisone (plus adrenaline if shock is caused by an allergicreaction)• For acute allergic reaction: Adrenaline and phenergen• For pulmonary oedema and cardiac failure: Frusemide (Lasix)• For insecticide poisoning: Atropine• For low blood sugar: 50% dextrose solution• For diabetic hyperglycaemia: Insulin• For snake bite: Snake bite anti-venom• For heart attack: Aspirin and thrombolytics, if available. Intravenous morphine may be given for severe pain.• For infections such as typhoid, meningitis, septicaemia, pelvic inflammatory disease, pneumonia and peritonitis: antibiotics.• For malaria: Antimalarial drugs such as quinine and chloroquine.Patients with most of these conditions will need early insertion of an intravenous lineFor immediate treatment of a burn, immerse the body part in cold water for the first 30 minutes and give pain medication.Communicate with the familyWhen the patient is in a life-threatening condition, family members need to be informed as soon as possible. Tell the family what happened, in the order in which the events occurred. Finish by telling the family what the patient's condition is now. If the patient is in a critical condition, it is useful to add something like, "He is not
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 14
Nursing care of the sick204 \awake and is in no pain." If the patient is dying, try to give the family some advance warning of what to expect.If the patient is in the emergency room or the operating theatre, or ifthe family should not come into the patient's room, make themcomfortable in a waiting area when they arrive and give them information about the patient as often and as quickly as possible. As soon as possible, allow one family member to see the patient if heor she would like that, but explain what will be seen.If the patient dies, allow the family to see the patient after death. Before they come in the room, make the body look as natural as possible. Place the body flat, with arms at the sides. Close the eyelids and mouth. Wash soiled areas of the body and cover with a sheet. Remove equipment and supplies from the bedside. Allow the family to stay as long as they would like to say goodbye to the patient. Provide comfort and care to the family.<< Back to Table of Contents

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2007-11-01 14:14:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ooops ... I seem to have copied much more than I intended ....

you could maybe use "pumping hand"
Selected response from:

David Hollywood
Local time: 14:51
Grading comment
Thanks David!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2compressing hand/hand used for compression
David Hollywood


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Stosshand
compressing hand/hand used for compression


Explanation:
I would say ...

The rationale behind this change was to prevent rib fractures and to keep the compressing hand on the sternum more easily [3]. ...
linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0300957205001589 - Similar pages

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2007-11-01 14:12:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you are alone, ventilate the adult patient with two slow,deep breaths lasting about two seconds each, as described above. Then compress the person's chest in the middle of the sternum 15 times. To find the correct position, first locate the notch or indentation below the sternum, place two fingers above the notch and place your compressing hand above the two fingers. After you have done 15 compressions, ventilate the person with 2 morebreaths. Then provide 15 more compressions. Repeat this four times.If the person is breathing now, monitor closely. If the person is not breathing, continue to ventilate with one breath every 5 to 6 seconds. If there is no pulse or breathing, continue with cardiopulmonaryresuscitation.If there are two people, one can pump the heart 80-100 times a minute while the other ventilates the lungs 12-15 times a minute, or once after every five chest compressions.Chest compression
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 7
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 197For cardiopulmonary resuscitation with children, compress thesternum using only one hand at a rate of 80-100 times a minute and ventilate the childonce everyfivecompressions.For infants, use two fingers to compress the chest 100 times a minute andventilate once every5 compressions.Compress the chest over the sternum,one finger breadth(width) below an imaginary line drawn between the infant's nipples.If the heart is beating but the patient's pulse is very weak, raise the patient's legs and begin intravenous fluids. Check the blood pressure. Prepare to begin chest compressions if needed. DUse a drip to ensure that the person is hydrated and prepare to administer ordered drugs.The patient may go into shock if there has been too little blood to thevital organs in the body. The signs of shock are:• anxiety, restlessness or fear• inability to concentrate• fast breathing• thirst, nausea• dilated pupils• pale and cool or cold skinChest compression of infant
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 8
Nursing care of the sick198 \• delayed capillary refilling• increased pulse and decreased blood pressure.If shock progresses, the patient may go into a coma or die from fluid and blood loss.Shock is common in patients experiencing severe injury, severe burns, a severe allergic reaction, drug overdose, poisoning, severe dehydration, sepsis (severe infection in the bloodstream), or amassive heart attack. It is standard practice to give fluids to patients in emergency situations.How to manage shock• Run an intravenous drip rapidly using normal saline,Hartmann's or plasma; use 5% dextrose solution ifnothing else is available. • Lay the person flat and elevate the legs to help venous blood return to the heart and increase blood pressure. Do not move the patient if spinal cord injury is suspected.Clinical alert: Do not raise the legs if the person has congestive heart failure, fluid in the lungs (pulmonary oedema) or severe difficulty breathing (respiratory distress).• Continue the intravenous drip until the patient’s blood pressure is normal.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 9
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 199Clinical alert: Do not give fluid to a head injury patient unless he or she is in shock, because the fluid may increase swelling in the brain (cerebral oedema). Be careful not to give too much fluid to cardiac failure patients or children. Some people suggest delaying fluids for persons with trauma.• Keep the patient warm.• Give oxygen if it is available. • Monitor the patient's airway, breathing and vital signs.How to manage bleedingIf the patient is bleeding, stop thebleeding using a pressure bandage or manual pressure directly over thewound. Pressure will almost always stop the bleeding.Raise the wound above the level of the heart, if possible. If necessary, apply direct pressureover pressure points such as over the main arteries (brachial in the inner arm or femoral in the upper thigh/groin). Sometimes a bleeding artery or vein is clearly visible in the wound. If pressure does not stop the bleeding, you can clamp the blood vessel with an artery forceps. Be extremely careful that you do not clamp a vital structure by mistake.Stop bleeding with pressure dressing
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 10
Nursing care of the sick200 \Clinical alert: Tourniquets are dangerous and should not be used to stop bleeding. The only time you ever use a tourniquet is for a wound of the lower limb where the profuse bleeding is life threatening. In this case, release the tourniquet for a few minutes every half hour.Establish the diagnosis of the patientOnce you have resuscitated the patient and stopped the bleeding, check for the underlying cause of the emergency and begintreatment. Take a brief, focused history and check vital signs.Head and neckCheck the head for wounds or lacerations, drainage from the nose or ears, mouth and jaw injuries.Look for swelling or injury to the neck. Smell the patient's breath for any unusual odour. Continue to monitor vital signs and assess the patient's level of consciousness. Keep an unconscious patient lying on his or her side. If there is injury to the eye, cover the eye with a patch.Check the pupils in both eyes. Normally they are equally round and react when a light is shined in them.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 11
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 201If the nose is bleeding, have the patient sit up if possible and pinch the nose for ten minutes to stop the bleeding. Shoulders and armsCheck the patient's shoulders, arms and hands. Have the person grip your hands and release, if he or she is able to. Check the range of motion of the elbow. If there are fractures, splint them.ChestCheck the patient's chest. The chest should expand equally on both sides when the patient breathes.Look for a sucking chest wound.Listen to breath sounds from both lungs with the stethoscope, and listen to heart sounds. The lung sounds should be equal on both sides. Feel the clavicles, sternum and ribs and ask if this causes pain. If the chest is open, cover the wound with a clean airtight dressing and bandage. If the patient has trouble breathing, untape one edge of the dressing so it acts as a valve. AbdomenAssess the abdomen for distension and injury. If you suspect damage to internal organs, or if the abdomen is very tender or rigid, continue intravenous fluids. Do not give anything by mouth because surgery may be necessary.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 12
Nursing care of the sick202 \SpineIf there is a spine injury, do not move the patient until you have at least three people to assist. The patient's neck and spine and trunk must not bend when he or she is moved. While waiting for help, place your hand gently under the lower curve of the back and feel for any tenderness or deformity. Lower extremitiesExamine and feel (palpate) the pelvic area and bones. Look for any obvious injuries. Examine the legs and feet for deformities, bleeding, bonyprotrusions, swelling or discolouration. Check pulses in feet.Emergency treatmentAfter confirmation of diagnosis, give emergency treatment. If no doctor is available, it may be necessary to arrange for transport of the patient to another health facility.Immediate drug treatment is essential forcertain conditions:The following drugs should be used according to the treatmentschedule (or protocols) established for your health facility.• For convulsions: Diazepam (Valium)• For postpartum haemorrhage: Ergometrine• For asthma: Aminophylline• For narcotic drug overdose: Narcan
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 13
Chapter 14. Care of patients in life-threatening emergencies/ 203• For patients in severe shock or having an allergicreaction: Intravenous or intramuscular hydrocortisone (plus adrenaline if shock is caused by an allergicreaction)• For acute allergic reaction: Adrenaline and phenergen• For pulmonary oedema and cardiac failure: Frusemide (Lasix)• For insecticide poisoning: Atropine• For low blood sugar: 50% dextrose solution• For diabetic hyperglycaemia: Insulin• For snake bite: Snake bite anti-venom• For heart attack: Aspirin and thrombolytics, if available. Intravenous morphine may be given for severe pain.• For infections such as typhoid, meningitis, septicaemia, pelvic inflammatory disease, pneumonia and peritonitis: antibiotics.• For malaria: Antimalarial drugs such as quinine and chloroquine.Patients with most of these conditions will need early insertion of an intravenous lineFor immediate treatment of a burn, immerse the body part in cold water for the first 30 minutes and give pain medication.Communicate with the familyWhen the patient is in a life-threatening condition, family members need to be informed as soon as possible. Tell the family what happened, in the order in which the events occurred. Finish by telling the family what the patient's condition is now. If the patient is in a critical condition, it is useful to add something like, "He is not
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 14
Nursing care of the sick204 \awake and is in no pain." If the patient is dying, try to give the family some advance warning of what to expect.If the patient is in the emergency room or the operating theatre, or ifthe family should not come into the patient's room, make themcomfortable in a waiting area when they arrive and give them information about the patient as often and as quickly as possible. As soon as possible, allow one family member to see the patient if heor she would like that, but explain what will be seen.If the patient dies, allow the family to see the patient after death. Before they come in the room, make the body look as natural as possible. Place the body flat, with arms at the sides. Close the eyelids and mouth. Wash soiled areas of the body and cover with a sheet. Remove equipment and supplies from the bedside. Allow the family to stay as long as they would like to say goodbye to the patient. Provide comfort and care to the family.<< Back to Table of Contents

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2007-11-01 14:14:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ooops ... I seem to have copied much more than I intended ....

you could maybe use "pumping hand"

David Hollywood
Local time: 14:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 284
Grading comment
Thanks David!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  casper
1 hr
  -> thanks Chetan :)

agree  Michelle Hertrich: I think "compressing hand" sound better.
1 hr
  -> thanks Michelle :) me too ....
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Changes made by editors
Dec 2, 2007 - Changes made by David Hollywood:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Nov 1, 2007 - Changes made by Johanna Timm, PhD:
Term askedStosshand » Stoßhand
Nov 1, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (write-in)Fist-aid manual » First-aid manual


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