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Doch soweit muss es erst gar nicht kommen

English translation: But it doesn't have to come to that

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Doch soweit muss es erst gar nicht kommen
English translation:But it doesn't have to come to that
Entered by: Rowan Morrell
Options:
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07:17 Jun 24, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Vitamins
German term or phrase: Doch soweit muss es erst gar nicht kommen
This sentence is part of a paragraph explaining how important vitamins are to your health. The immediately preceding sentences explained how lack of vitamins can lead to all sorts of nasty diseases developing, like heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's Parkinson's and so forth.

Is the meaning simply, "But these can all be prevented"? Or is it something like "This does not have to be the case"? TIA for your help.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 01:16
It doesn't have to come to that
Explanation:
-
Selected response from:

hirselina
Grading comment
I did wonder about something like this as well, and Hirselina's answer seems to have got the most peer support, so I'll use her answer and thus give her the points. But thanks also to Wenjer and Derek for their ideas.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3It doesn't have to come to thathirselina
4 +1the first sentenceWenjer Leuschel
4 -1It doesn't have to go this far in the first place.
Derek Gill Franßen


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the first sentence


Explanation:
"But these can all be prevented" would be closer to the original meaning than "This does not have to be the case."

The second sentence can lead to misunderstanding.

Wenjer Leuschel
Taiwan
Local time: 21:16
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese
PRO pts in category: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sylvie malich: fits nicely, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"
2 mins
  -> Nice saying. Thank you, Sylvia.
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
It doesn't have to come to that


Explanation:
-

hirselina
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
I did wonder about something like this as well, and Hirselina's answer seems to have got the most peer support, so I'll use her answer and thus give her the points. But thanks also to Wenjer and Derek for their ideas.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cilian O'Tuama
30 mins

agree  Richard Benham: The obvious and good option§
5 hrs

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: Yes, this sounds better.
17 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
It doesn't have to go this far in the first place.


Explanation:
Another suggestion

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 35 mins (2004-06-24 23:53:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I found at least the first part being used in a similar setting under:

Support for eating disorders available - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... Stress of college life may contribute to problem Rebecca Kavoussi Daily Staff. Left
unchecked, eating disorders can kill. But it doesn\'t have to go that far. ...
archives.thedaily.washington.edu/ 1996/021696/diet021696.html - 7k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 43 mins (2004-06-25 00:01:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And yet another very similar usage in this context:

http://home.earthlink.net/~gaiaecologye-zine/fall03/id22.htm...

The immediately preceding sentences explained how lack of vitamins can lead to all sorts of nasty diseases developing, like heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer\'s... oh no wait that was Rowan\'s description of his question. The diseases were related to mold that was allowed to develope and which could have been avoided in the first place by removing the mold. ;)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 15:16
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 109

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Richard Benham: Not very idiomatic English, misses the point, and there is nothing to suggest "in the first place".
3 hrs
  -> You may very well be right, but then again, you may be wrong. I don't think it's all that far off, considering I found it used in the same type of setting. The terms "erst gar" as used here suggest to me "in the first place". Please see the note I added.

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: agree with your 'erst gar'-comment, but 'have to go this far' sounds odd ;-) //nothing wrong with civil self defence :-)
15 hrs
  -> I actually agree that the translation "It doesn't have to come to that." sounds better. My phrase usually pertains to an anticipated act of violence (if I understand it correctly). I was just defending my proposition (hopefully in a sportsmanlike manner).
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