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1.DA

English translation: first diagonal artery

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:1.DA
English translation:first diagonal artery
Entered by: Derek Gill Franßen
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22:44 Jul 22, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / pathology
German term or phrase: 1.DA
die heutige untersuchung zeigt eine hochgradige bifurkationsstenose RIVA/1.DA

Thanks
Ian Jones
Spain
Local time: 13:48
principle/first diagonal artery
Explanation:
At first I thought "first descending artery", but I don't think that is right - see page 5 patient no. 13 of this PDF-file: http://www.smw.ch/pdf/2000_33/2000-33-079.pdf (there "prox" = "proximal".

:)

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Note added at 2 hrs 59 mins (2004-07-23 01:44:36 GMT)
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The principle/first diagonal artery describes a section of the LAD (left anterior descending = Ramus interventricularis anterior [=RIVA]der linken Koronararterie).

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Note added at 3 hrs 2 mins (2004-07-23 01:47:44 GMT)
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In most people, the LAD and LCX have a common origin from the left coronary cusp of the aortic root, a short vessel termed the LM coronary artery (LM). The RCA has a separate origin in the right coronary cusp. Normally, the aortic cusps from which the coronary arteries arise are anterior and face the pulmonary valve. The third cusp (posterior cusp) just above the aortic valve has no arterial branch. Anatomic variants are common.

The branches of the LAD are called diagonals and successively labeled as D1, D2, etc. The portion from LM to the first diagonal (D1) is called the proximal segment of the LAD. The portion between D1 and D2 is the middle segment, and that beyond D2 is called the distal segment. The distal segment typically covers the anterior aspect of the apex of the left ventricle (LV). However, in some cases, it wraps around to cover the inferior surface of the apex as well (“wrap-around LAD\"). In addition to diagonal branches, the LAD gives off numerous, small, septal perforators that supply the anterior two thirds of the intraventricular septum.

The branches of the LCX are called obtuse marginal branches and numbered sequentially (OM1, OM2, etc). The LCX often runs around the base of the heart near the atrioventricular (AV) groove. In 20% of patients, it reaches the crux, where the AV groove meets the posterior interventricular septum and turns to supply the inferior surface of the heart as the posterior descending artery (PDA).

In 70% of cases, the PDA is the distal continuation of the RCA. If the PDA stems from the RCA, the circulation is described as right dominant, and if the PDA comes from the LCX, the supply system is called left dominant. In some patients, both the RCA and the LCX contribute to the PDA, a condition described as co-dominant. Whatever supplies the PDA is responsible for blood delivery to the AV node (AVN), which penetrates the heart from the crux and the posterior one third of the septum.

The proximal RCA supplies the sinoatrial (SAN) via a branch that runs between the aortic root and the superior vena cava. The RCA runs near the AV groove heading toward the crux, and it has a large branch called the acute marginal (AM) branch before it reaches the crux. The RCA may continue past the crux with LV extension branches, or it may terminate early.
(source: http://www.emedicine.com/radio/topic192.htm)
Selected response from:

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 13:48
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3principle/first diagonal artery
Derek Gill Franßen


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
principle/first diagonal artery


Explanation:
At first I thought "first descending artery", but I don't think that is right - see page 5 patient no. 13 of this PDF-file: http://www.smw.ch/pdf/2000_33/2000-33-079.pdf (there "prox" = "proximal".

:)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 59 mins (2004-07-23 01:44:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The principle/first diagonal artery describes a section of the LAD (left anterior descending = Ramus interventricularis anterior [=RIVA]der linken Koronararterie).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 2 mins (2004-07-23 01:47:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In most people, the LAD and LCX have a common origin from the left coronary cusp of the aortic root, a short vessel termed the LM coronary artery (LM). The RCA has a separate origin in the right coronary cusp. Normally, the aortic cusps from which the coronary arteries arise are anterior and face the pulmonary valve. The third cusp (posterior cusp) just above the aortic valve has no arterial branch. Anatomic variants are common.

The branches of the LAD are called diagonals and successively labeled as D1, D2, etc. The portion from LM to the first diagonal (D1) is called the proximal segment of the LAD. The portion between D1 and D2 is the middle segment, and that beyond D2 is called the distal segment. The distal segment typically covers the anterior aspect of the apex of the left ventricle (LV). However, in some cases, it wraps around to cover the inferior surface of the apex as well (“wrap-around LAD\"). In addition to diagonal branches, the LAD gives off numerous, small, septal perforators that supply the anterior two thirds of the intraventricular septum.

The branches of the LCX are called obtuse marginal branches and numbered sequentially (OM1, OM2, etc). The LCX often runs around the base of the heart near the atrioventricular (AV) groove. In 20% of patients, it reaches the crux, where the AV groove meets the posterior interventricular septum and turns to supply the inferior surface of the heart as the posterior descending artery (PDA).

In 70% of cases, the PDA is the distal continuation of the RCA. If the PDA stems from the RCA, the circulation is described as right dominant, and if the PDA comes from the LCX, the supply system is called left dominant. In some patients, both the RCA and the LCX contribute to the PDA, a condition described as co-dominant. Whatever supplies the PDA is responsible for blood delivery to the AV node (AVN), which penetrates the heart from the crux and the posterior one third of the septum.

The proximal RCA supplies the sinoatrial (SAN) via a branch that runs between the aortic root and the superior vena cava. The RCA runs near the AV groove heading toward the crux, and it has a large branch called the acute marginal (AM) branch before it reaches the crux. The RCA may continue past the crux with LV extension branches, or it may terminate early.
(source: http://www.emedicine.com/radio/topic192.htm)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 109
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Siegfried Armbruster
4 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  xxxtnkw: Diagonalast ..also referred to as the 'diagonal ramus/branch' ... cf Churchill 'Pocketbook of Cardiology' [Grubb] p.404
5 hrs
  -> Thank you for the additional information.

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
5 hrs
  -> Thanks.
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