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im freien Felde lag

English translation: ...unprotected out in the open.... (not a 1:1 term)

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17:38 Mar 21, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Military / Defense
German term or phrase: im freien Felde lag
this is from the 1931 Official history of the World War (der weltkrieg):

Angriff gegen die 14. Infanterie-Division, der aber im deutschen Infanterie¬feuer liegenblieb. Die bis zum Abend einlaufenden Meldungen ließen erkennen, daß die augenblickliche deutsche Verteidigungslinie zwischen Neuve Chapelle und der zweiten Stellung im freien Felde lag. Am Abend des 11. März griff der Gegner bei Neuve Chapelle von neuem an. Auch dieser Angriff konnte mit Unterstützung einiger Kompagnien der 6. bayerischen Reserve-Division abgewiesen werden.

Is it saying that there was a gap in the defensive line between Neuve Chapelle and the second position? If so, I cannot figure out whether the second position meant the second defensive line or another point on the map. In the paragraphs previous to this there were at least three possible "other points" mentioned. thanks in advance.
mhumphries
Local time: 06:52
English translation:...unprotected out in the open.... (not a 1:1 term)
Explanation:
In this context it is reffering to a combat situation and position where the Infantry in question was under "direct fire" Hence we can assume they were unprotected from enemy fire/attack "out in the open" is an English term I belive which describes the situation indirectly in terms of what the field is like. I imagine the field mentioned here is one where no trees or other natural objects can be used for cover. That is why out in the open somehow describes all inclusive what is meant in this context in reference to "freien feld".

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Note added at 29 mins (2007-03-21 18:08:04 GMT)
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By the way I suspect the gap is not a trench if it is then it means the troops are not near it to take cover!

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-03-21 19:04:50 GMT)
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The word "lag" means situated instead of "placed/laying down etc.."

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-21 19:59:16 GMT)
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CORRECTION: As Willem Verkist drew my attention to the fact that no gaps exists, I believe you should ignore my first note or see it as rephrased this way please: ".....I suspect there is no gap and if there is then this would mean the troops are not near enough to use it as a cover"
Selected response from:

Kcda
Grading comment
Sorry for taking so long. Great help
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3...unprotected out in the open.... (not a 1:1 term)
Kcda


  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
...unprotected out in the open.... (not a 1:1 term)


Explanation:
In this context it is reffering to a combat situation and position where the Infantry in question was under "direct fire" Hence we can assume they were unprotected from enemy fire/attack "out in the open" is an English term I belive which describes the situation indirectly in terms of what the field is like. I imagine the field mentioned here is one where no trees or other natural objects can be used for cover. That is why out in the open somehow describes all inclusive what is meant in this context in reference to "freien feld".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2007-03-21 18:08:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way I suspect the gap is not a trench if it is then it means the troops are not near it to take cover!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-03-21 19:04:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The word "lag" means situated instead of "placed/laying down etc.."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-21 19:59:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

CORRECTION: As Willem Verkist drew my attention to the fact that no gaps exists, I believe you should ignore my first note or see it as rephrased this way please: ".....I suspect there is no gap and if there is then this would mean the troops are not near enough to use it as a cover"

Kcda
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Sorry for taking so long. Great help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Willem Verkist: No gap, and no words about a second defensive line. The second position is *on* the front line.
1 hr
  -> Thanks! This part of the question confused me "In the paragraphs previous to this there were at least three possible "other points" mentioned". The asker unintentionally lead me to think some kind of gaps exists and whether this is relevant or not!?

agree  Rebecca Garber: The defensive line between NC and the 2nd, unnamed position, was out in the open (and could be fired upon).
19 hrs
  -> Thank you indeed for your supportive comment!

agree  Craig Meulen: agree with Rebecca and Willem
20 hrs
  -> Thank you sincerely!
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