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Sprachvertonung

English translation: musical expression of words

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Sprachvertonung
English translation:musical expression of words
Entered by: Damian Harrison
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12:08 Apr 6, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Music / Music theory
German term or phrase: Sprachvertonung
Wissenschaftler der Universität diskutierten grundlegenden Aspekten der Sprachvertonung im Vokalwerk Mozarts.

Is this another way of saying they discussed the specifics of the style of Mozart's vocal compositions?
'Vertonung' in the sense of 'recording' doesn´t seem to fit here.
Damian Harrison
Germany
Local time: 06:12
musical expression of words
Explanation:
or:
expressing of words in music/musical expressing of words

however, "expression" can also just refer to singing,
so maybe:

the transformation (expansion) of words into music/musical transformation (expansion) of words

creative process of taking words (a poem etc./libretto) as the basis and expressing them musically, adding the musical dimension to the words, whereby some words can also be changed. In the case of a llibretto, the words/style are already carefully chosen to be used for this musical transformation.


I also thought of "musicalization of words" but this refers to the musical characteristics in Chinese poetry: http://content.cdlib.org/xtf/view?docId=ft129003tp&chunk.id=...

another suggestion:
the conversion of words into music

Diana's suggestion is used most frequently to describe the process, it also puts emphasis on the text as the basis/starting point. The way the music is composed and the way the words are sung/has everything to do with the content of the text. However, in my opinion, "setting words to music" doesn't do the whole process - which is more then putting music to a text - justice, and also, it could possibly mean that the music already existed.

It's the text in a musical setting/it is a musical setting of the words

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Orff
musical setting

http://www.lalavoicecoach.com/index.html
The beauty of sound itself. Singing is ultimately the musical expression of words, and with words we can express the whole range of human emotions.


http://www.freidok.uni-freiburg.de/volltexte/1638/pdf/30_mac...

W. Dömling, "Aspekte der Sprachvertonung in den Balladen Guillaume de Machauts," Die Musikforschung 25 (1972): 301-7 (305) points out that the melodic sequence in bar 4 is an equivalent to the repeat of the word 'ploures.'

http://www.hausarbeiten.de/zeit/vorschau/48161.html
Sprachvertonung
Selected response from:

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 00:12
Grading comment
I´d actually like to give points to Bernhard, Joachim AND Gert but apparently that´s against the rules... Thanks very much Bernard, with so little context this was a very tricky one...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5the setting of words to musicDiana Loos
4relation(ship) between words and music
Gert Sass (M.A.)
3 +1musical setting of languageJoachim Siegert
3 +1uniting words and music
writeaway
3musical expression of words
Bernhard Sulzer


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
uniting words and music


Explanation:
Mozart is a genius when it comes to letting the music convey the meaning of the words and vice-versa. I think it's more than just the style of his vocal compositions. I'd imagine this is hard to write about unless you know Mozart's vocal compositions, including Lieder, opera arias, concert arias, religious music etc.

writeaway
Local time: 06:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DespinaB: Greetings & thanks from Salzburg, die Mozartstadt! As a professional singer & translator, I'm also wondering if they're also discussing the very WORDING used in the lyrics, i.e. the libretti: the literary styles, vocabulary... & even the language styles?
2 hrs
  -> wow-seems it was a guys only question. too bad they can't target gender. ;-)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the setting of words to music


Explanation:
It's much more than "the style of his vocal works"- this would mean only the composition, but it has to do with the combination of both. It has nothing at all to do with recording!!!

Diana Loos
Local time: 06:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: my take as well
1 hr

agree  Tilman Lichter
2 hrs

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: this is mostly used to decribe the process, although it doesn't really do the whole process justice (IMO).:)
4 hrs

agree  Wagner Azevedo
23 hrs

agree  Ingeborg Gowans
1 day5 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
musical setting of language


Explanation:
...is backed by an amazing one google hit! A rather classy reference though: Somewhere insinde the "Proceedings of the Royal Musical Association", 25th Session 1898/1899 it reads
"They must have felt that this was as much a new creation demanding genius to conceive as any musical setting of language" (Joseph Goddard: The Philosophy of the Higher Beauty of Music).
Hope it makes you wiser. I reckon this suggestion doesn't require a great of creativity to come up with after Diana's answer, but I feel that "language" should be used rather than "words" because it's not simply about finding the right notes for a number of single words and lining them up, but about setting patterns which emerge on a higher level than that of single words like the intonation of sentences. These patterns are more than the sum of their parts, and while "words" can mean more than a bunch of randomly sorted flashcards, "language" clearly does mean greater patterns. After all, the author chose to write "Sprachvertonung" rather than "Wortvertonung".

Scientists of the University discussed (the) fundamental features of the musical setting of language in Mozart's vocal oeuvre.

Scientists of the University discussed (the) fundamental features of Mozart's setting of language in his vocal oeuvre.

Notes (without relevance to the question): I can't tell whether to use the article here because there is a mistake in the German sentence (word missing/wrong case).
As for the "fundamentalen Aspekte", maybe I have just a too imaginative way of understanding words, but I find the idea of an aspect of an object, i. e. of a way of looking at the object, as being fundamental for the object odd. Aspects of Mozart's compositions may lay the foundation for the opinions and musical ways of expression of other people studying the compositions, but the are not fundamental for the compositions themselves. By contrast, "feature" is something inherent to the object, and may therefore be fundamental for it.
I don't know if I'm making myself clear and it doesn't really matter anyway.

Joachim Siegert
China
Local time: 06:12
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
Notes to answerer
Asker: Regarding the "fundamentalen Aspekten" - that would be my take too. It´s a rather odd text - presumably the cut-and-paste edit of a longer, more detailed discussion.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bernhard Sulzer: very apt (IMO): "musical setting of words/text/language" or maybe "language etc. in (a) musical setting."
18 mins
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
musical expression of words


Explanation:
or:
expressing of words in music/musical expressing of words

however, "expression" can also just refer to singing,
so maybe:

the transformation (expansion) of words into music/musical transformation (expansion) of words

creative process of taking words (a poem etc./libretto) as the basis and expressing them musically, adding the musical dimension to the words, whereby some words can also be changed. In the case of a llibretto, the words/style are already carefully chosen to be used for this musical transformation.


I also thought of "musicalization of words" but this refers to the musical characteristics in Chinese poetry: http://content.cdlib.org/xtf/view?docId=ft129003tp&chunk.id=...

another suggestion:
the conversion of words into music

Diana's suggestion is used most frequently to describe the process, it also puts emphasis on the text as the basis/starting point. The way the music is composed and the way the words are sung/has everything to do with the content of the text. However, in my opinion, "setting words to music" doesn't do the whole process - which is more then putting music to a text - justice, and also, it could possibly mean that the music already existed.

It's the text in a musical setting/it is a musical setting of the words

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Orff
musical setting

http://www.lalavoicecoach.com/index.html
The beauty of sound itself. Singing is ultimately the musical expression of words, and with words we can express the whole range of human emotions.


http://www.freidok.uni-freiburg.de/volltexte/1638/pdf/30_mac...

W. Dömling, "Aspekte der Sprachvertonung in den Balladen Guillaume de Machauts," Die Musikforschung 25 (1972): 301-7 (305) points out that the melodic sequence in bar 4 is an equivalent to the repeat of the word 'ploures.'

http://www.hausarbeiten.de/zeit/vorschau/48161.html
Sprachvertonung

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 26
Grading comment
I´d actually like to give points to Bernhard, Joachim AND Gert but apparently that´s against the rules... Thanks very much Bernard, with so little context this was a very tricky one...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Sprachvertonung (or: Wort-Ton-Verhältnis)
relation(ship) between words and music


Explanation:
Is what is meant in this context. To my knowledge, Wort-Ton-Verhältnis is the preferable German term. Studying medieval (and earlier) up to modern vocal music (e. g. J. S. Bach’s Cantatas, or F. Schubert’s song cycles “Die Schöne Müllerin” and “Winterreise”), you will encounter an abundance of musical means used to emphasize the meaning of the sung words. It would probably take more than one Wikipedia article to provide a more detailed explanation together with examples. (Surprisingly to me, I haven’t been able to find a single relevant Wikipedia article on this issue.)
Alternatively, you could use “word-music combination/relation”.

Examples:

http://tiny.cc/szSjR

http://tiny.cc/AY4KR

There was a close ***relationship between the words and the music***. Composers wanted to enhance the meaning and emotion of the text, and did so by means of ‘word painting’ i.e. : trying to project poetic imagery through link between music and words. As vocal music was more important, most music was sung a cappella.
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Western_Music_History/Renaissan...

‘Dryden’s and Brady’s words,’ she avers, by way of example, ‘while delightful, are not in themselves musical...Though they praise music as a creative principle, they also move away from the ***relation between words and music*** conceptually’
http://sscm-jscm.press.uiuc.edu/v6/no2/walkling.html

The book will comprise a study of the various ways in which the ***relation between words and music*** has been theorised and practised, with a view to demonstrating how theology, a discipline which of necessity involves words, can comes to terms with and benefit from phenomena that cannot be reduced to the order of words, such as music.
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/itia/publications.html

The relation between words and music has always been a central issue in opera. How would you describe the way this relation works in The Gambler?
http://tiny.cc/8Jjjw

"Opera as Expression: Notes on the Relation between Words and Music," The Hudson Review, Summer 1976


Gert Sass (M.A.)
Germany
Local time: 06:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 24
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