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Namenszusätze

English translation: titles and suffixes

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Namenszusätze
English translation:titles and suffixes
Entered by: Natalie Wilcock
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12:16 Jan 12, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Names (personal, company) / relational database search
German term or phrase: Namenszusätze
Eine Ausnahmeliste mit Namenszusätzen (Titel u.ä.), die bei einer Namenssuche abgewiesen werden sollen.
Natalie Wilcock
Local time: 18:03
name extensions
Explanation:
is a possibility, though it might be clearer if you could give some more context. It seems a rather odd sentence, from what I know of relational databases. Queries should normally return everything asked for, without producing "exception lists of name supplements which should be rejected in a name search".

By the way, I see Leo gives "name affix" for Namenzusatz, but it strikes me as rather non-English, and looking at a Google search on the phrase only reinforces this impression.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-12 14:13:54 (GMT)
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I have just understood what it really says, and what it is doing. It is dealing with the problem that making a relational database search on a personal name field you can miss some entries you want to get, if they have titles such as \"Dr.\" in them. You search on \"Watson\", but it doesn´t give you a record that has \"Watson, Dr.\" in the name field.

The understanding makes more sense of \"name affixes\" but this still strikes me as rather odd, even though I see Fred agrees with it. I used to write stuff like this, descriptions of relational database systems, and I think I would have used either \"name extensions (titles etc.)\", or even just \"titles etc.\".
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:03
Grading comment
Thanks Chris

In the end I opted for titles and affixes as that is what they seem to be trying to get across.
Regards,
Natalie
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2name affixxxxGAK
3 +3name extensionsChris Rowson
5name suffix
EdithK


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
name affix


Explanation:
name affixes like titles etc.

Wörterbuch Personal- und Bildungswesen

Hope it helps.


    WB Personal- u. Bildungswesen
xxxGAK
Local time: 18:03
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Fred Thomson
1 hr

agree  Anca Nitu
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
name extensions


Explanation:
is a possibility, though it might be clearer if you could give some more context. It seems a rather odd sentence, from what I know of relational databases. Queries should normally return everything asked for, without producing "exception lists of name supplements which should be rejected in a name search".

By the way, I see Leo gives "name affix" for Namenzusatz, but it strikes me as rather non-English, and looking at a Google search on the phrase only reinforces this impression.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-12 14:13:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have just understood what it really says, and what it is doing. It is dealing with the problem that making a relational database search on a personal name field you can miss some entries you want to get, if they have titles such as \"Dr.\" in them. You search on \"Watson\", but it doesn´t give you a record that has \"Watson, Dr.\" in the name field.

The understanding makes more sense of \"name affixes\" but this still strikes me as rather odd, even though I see Fred agrees with it. I used to write stuff like this, descriptions of relational database systems, and I think I would have used either \"name extensions (titles etc.)\", or even just \"titles etc.\".

Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks Chris

In the end I opted for titles and affixes as that is what they seem to be trying to get across.
Regards,
Natalie

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elvira Stoianov: it's the same I thought too, before seeing the answers
1 hr

agree  Hermann
2 hrs

agree  gangels
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
name suffix


Explanation:
see the following websites.


    Reference: http://www.co.orange.nc.us/boards/volapp.asp
    Reference: http://www.bep.mit.edu/Application.pdf
EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 18:03
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Feb 1, 2006 - Changes made by Natalie Wilcock:
Field (specific)(none) » Names (personal, company)


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