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Müße

English translation: cap

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Mütze
English translation:cap
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

01:25 May 23, 2002
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
German term or phrase: Müße
Chapter title of a store catalog. circa 1939. I believe the word means "Hat or Cap", but all on-line translators give the meaning as "Must". It is not listed in the Oxford dictionary.

Items listed under this heading are:

Schi – Müße (Ski – Must)
Dienstmüße (Service must)
Müßenkordel (Having cord?)


Thank you
Don (Jake) Grove
Don Grove
cap
Explanation:
Maybe the word is Mütze, which means cap.
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 02:01
Grading comment
Thank you for confirming my first impression.

Klaus Herrmann's comments on the 'tz ligature' clears this up with this word and a few others in the catalog I'm trans-scribing.The others: ch, ck, etc., I was able to make out, but the tz never crossed my mind.

Thank you all ver much.

Don (Jake) Grove
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10cap, hat
Hans-Henning Judek
4 +8cap
Kim Metzger
4 +5capwrtransco
4 -1musts
Jonathan MacKerron
4 -1Could it be Muße?
Trudy Peters


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
cap


Explanation:
Maybe the word is Mütze, which means cap.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 02:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21821
Grading comment
Thank you for confirming my first impression.

Klaus Herrmann's comments on the 'tz ligature' clears this up with this word and a few others in the catalog I'm trans-scribing.The others: ch, ck, etc., I was able to make out, but the tz never crossed my mind.

Thank you all ver much.

Don (Jake) Grove

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angela C.: great!
8 mins

agree  Petra Winter
2 hrs

agree  Ingrid Grzeszik
4 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
6 hrs

agree  jerrie
6 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter: yep!
7 hrs

agree  Klaus Herrmann: In 1939, the tz ligature was still in use, i.e. a t and z are connected to form one single character. This can be mistaken to be an ß, the German double s. It's definitely Mütze, i.e. a cap.
7 hrs

agree  jccantrell: yep, agree with Klaus and it must be cap
12 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
cap, hat


Explanation:
I think this is a misspelling of "Mütze". I have checked all "Müße" and even in Swiss German no such word is available in this context.
There is an old spelling for "müsse" (müße; subjunctive of must), but this cannot fit here.


    Copernic search
Hans-Henning Judek
Local time: 16:01
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 893

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angela C.
11 mins

agree  Petra Winter
2 hrs

agree  Elvira Stoianov
4 hrs

agree  Andrea Kopf
5 hrs

agree  Caro Maucher
5 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
6 hrs

agree  jerrie
6 hrs

neutral  schmurr: it's not a misspelling but a misreading: a junction of "t" and an old-fashioned "z" even found today: the right wing of the "t" is prolonged down in an acute angle and then forms a belly, so it isn't a "ß"
7 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter: "Mütze"="cap" is correct but I fully agree with Martin's explanation, which would IMO apply to both printed and handwritten texts of these years.
7 hrs

agree  Klaus Herrmann: Yup. It's a tz ligature.
7 hrs

agree  xxxbrute
9 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
cap


Explanation:
You could not find it, because it does not exist with this spelling. What you are looking for is "Mütze".

wrtransco
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 236

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gerhard Hofmann: Yes, the 'tz' could be misread as 'sz'
2 hrs

agree  Petra Winter
2 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
6 hrs

agree  jerrie
6 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter
7 hrs
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Could it be Muße?


Explanation:
Muße means leisure. Is it a catalog of leisure items?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-23 01:43:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Like casual clothing, sports equipment, patio furniture, etc.

Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3087

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Theo Bose: depending on contex
3 mins

neutral  wrtransco: eine Schi-Muße? :-) Die muss dann aber erst "wachgeküsst" werden! There is no depending on context here.
3 hrs
  -> Agree. I should read the whole question! :-(

disagree  schmurr: a leisure cord doesn't do honor to the translator either
7 hrs

disagree  Steffen Walter: see Martin's comment
7 hrs

neutral  Сергей Лузан: Zweifelhaft. Einverstanden mit Mag. RaWa
7 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
musts


Explanation:
maybe a self-coined word to imply 'things you just have to have'

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5577

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Сергей Лузан: See comments above, they explain anything.
2 hrs
  -> I did say 'maybe' so there is no reason to disagree
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