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Laubenpieper

English translation: allotment gardener

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Laubenpieper
English translation:allotment gardener
Entered by: Krokodil
Options:
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13:36 Aug 6, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: Laubenpieper
Refers as far as I know to a person who owns an allotment garden in a "Kolonie", but I don't know whether there's actually an English equivalent.

Am I right in assuming that the word is slightly contemptuous or derogatory?

Any help appreciated!
Krokodil
Germany
Local time: 03:50
allotment gardener
Explanation:
Laubenpieper i.m.o. is not derogatory; it is a more quaint colloquialism for Schrebergaertner or Hobbygaertner.

This is one of those words where it depends on how you say it. Usually, there is asense of slight bemusement associated with the word.
Selected response from:

allemande
United States
Local time: 21:50
Grading comment
Sounds fine to me. Indeed, the documentary in which I heard the term was dealing with general social conditions in the Cottbus area, i.e. not a million miles from Berlin (re. Klaus's comments).
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +7allotment gardener
allemande
4gazebo squattergangels
4allotment holder
jerrie
3garden colony allotment tenant (leaseholder)
Jonathan MacKerron
3allotment garden chirper or garden chirper
Dr. Fred Thomson


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
allotment garden chirper or garden chirper


Explanation:
This is only a literal translation, but it has a nice ring to it.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Karin Walker: I'm not sure whether a literal translation works here; but Cham. is right in thinking that it is slightly derogatory/condescending. NOt sure whether this population strata actually exists in the English-speaking world (true German "spiessig") ;-)
13 mins
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
allotment gardener


Explanation:
Laubenpieper i.m.o. is not derogatory; it is a more quaint colloquialism for Schrebergaertner or Hobbygaertner.

This is one of those words where it depends on how you say it. Usually, there is asense of slight bemusement associated with the word.

allemande
United States
Local time: 21:50
PRO pts in pair: 71
Grading comment
Sounds fine to me. Indeed, the documentary in which I heard the term was dealing with general social conditions in the Cottbus area, i.e. not a million miles from Berlin (re. Klaus's comments).

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Klaus Herrmann: IMO, Laubenpieper is not derogatory. The German Kleingärtner has a far more "spiessig" ring to it. And it might be worth mentioning that Laubenpieper is limited to the Berlin area. (In my area, one would refer to them as Schrebergärtner or Kleingärtner).
17 mins

agree  Rod Darby: no, not derogatory, just 'Berliner Fresse' (the Gedächtniskirche is called 'Der Hohle Zahn')
42 mins

agree  pschmitt
1 hr

agree  Bob Kerns
2 hrs

agree  Edward L. Crosby III: Not derogatory at all in "Ich trag' den Staub" (Reinhard Mey)
2 hrs

agree  Michaela Müller
7 hrs

agree  Craig Hills: Although the allotments I have seen around Hamburg differ greatly from those in the UK or the US, what luxury you have with your Garden Homes, (Gartenhaeuschen). See link: http://wordreference.com/de/en/translation.asp?deen=laubenpi...
14 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
allotment holder


Explanation:
In BrE I think it is more common to describe someone who gardens on an allotment as an allotment holder. You rent the allotment from the council and garden on it.
It is not a derogatory term in English...just not as common/popular as they used to be!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1469
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
gazebo squatter


Explanation:
you might call it in the US, which is literal, or "garden plot squatter", which makes it "Schrebergärtner", both somewhat colloquial.

gangels
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 5190

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: gazebo squatter would be one who squats gazebos, n'est-ce pas?
3 hrs
  -> Au contraire, mon ami, a squatter is someone clinging to a piece of land, legally or semi-legally. Meant to be a bit sarcastic, as is Laubenpieper. Chirper would not be understood, I think.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
garden colony allotment tenant (leaseholder)


Explanation:
long-winded I know, but at least the meaning is self-evident

Jonathan MacKerron
Local time: 03:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5465
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