KudoZ home » German to English » Education / Pedagogy

Rektor

English translation: Vice-Chancellor

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Rektor
English translation:Vice-Chancellor
Entered by: Libero_Lang_Lab
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:46 Aug 12, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / Tertiary Education
German term or phrase: Rektor
For this word, the Collins dictionary said that the "Rektor" of a "Fachhochschule" is a "principal". However, I'm a bit sceptical about that, because as I understand it, a principal is the head of a primary or secondary school, not a tertiary institution. I'm leaning towards "vice-chancellor" or possibly even the literal "rector". Does anyone know which would be best? Or is the Collins right?
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 10:28
You're probably correct
Explanation:
Be careful of rector.

In Oxbridge colleges you have a rector and this is indeed the head of the college.

But for example in a Scottish university the rector is an honorary appointment, often a celebrity figure, elected or chosen to "front" the student body.

The vice-chancellor would indeed be the true executive head of a university (in England or Scotland - not sure about the USA), as the chancellor is again an honorary appointment.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-12 12:40:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To Chris Rowson: Chancellor and vice-chancellor are different positions, and I very much suspect that if you went to a UK uni, you had both, but perhaps the chancellor was a more high-profile name. In fact though, it is the vice-chancellor who makes all of the big decisions. Think of it like an executive director and a president of a commercial organisation - the president\'s role will be less hands-on and more of an ambassadorial one, while the executive director actually runs the shop.
Selected response from:

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:28
Grading comment
It was really hard picking a winner here, and I must admit I'm still not totally clear about this. Not only the Collins, but also the Oxford/Duden, says Rektor means "principal" in a Fachhochschule context. But I still don't like that in a tertiary context. Maybe "principal" would be all right for a "Fachoberschule", but not "Fachhochschule".

So, I've ended up opting for "vice-chancellor". Dan was basically first in with the "right" answer and gave a helpful explanation of the difference between Vice-Chancellor and Chancellor (though these offices are very similar in New Zealand universities). So he edges out Steffen. Commiserations, Steffen, but thank you for your help. And thanks to everyone else who contributed as well.

I'll leave this out of the glossary, because there are several possible solutions depending on the context, and in some cases, it seems to be a bit up the in air.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3below
Cilian O'Tuama
4 +2Deangangels
4 +2You're probably correct
Libero_Lang_Lab
4 +1vice chancellor
David Kiltz
5the following from the Oxford Dudenjkjones
4Chancellor
Steffen Walter


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Chancellor


Explanation:
I would say...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-12 10:52:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Der Große Eichborn gives \"chancellor\" as \"Rektor (Universität)\" but I would also use it for a Fachhochschule in support of your argument that both are institutions of higher (or tertiary) education.

Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 00:28
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 220

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Libero_Lang_Lab: see my response below
2 mins
  -> Then I'd go for vice-chancellor, in the light of your good explanation.

agree  Chris Rowson: I think this is more common in Britain than Vice-Chancellor. I and both of my brothers were at Universities with Chancellors (Bath, Birmingham, Essex).
29 mins
  -> Hmm... the uncertainty remains...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
below


Explanation:
Rektor m einer Schule: headmaster, Amerikanisches Englisch principal; Universität vice-chancellor, principal, Amerikanisches Englisch president

© 2001 Langenscheidt
HTH

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 00:28
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 69

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
2 mins

agree  David Kiltz
5 mins

agree  Dr. Fred Thomson
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
You're probably correct


Explanation:
Be careful of rector.

In Oxbridge colleges you have a rector and this is indeed the head of the college.

But for example in a Scottish university the rector is an honorary appointment, often a celebrity figure, elected or chosen to "front" the student body.

The vice-chancellor would indeed be the true executive head of a university (in England or Scotland - not sure about the USA), as the chancellor is again an honorary appointment.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-12 12:40:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To Chris Rowson: Chancellor and vice-chancellor are different positions, and I very much suspect that if you went to a UK uni, you had both, but perhaps the chancellor was a more high-profile name. In fact though, it is the vice-chancellor who makes all of the big decisions. Think of it like an executive director and a president of a commercial organisation - the president\'s role will be less hands-on and more of an ambassadorial one, while the executive director actually runs the shop.

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:28
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
It was really hard picking a winner here, and I must admit I'm still not totally clear about this. Not only the Collins, but also the Oxford/Duden, says Rektor means "principal" in a Fachhochschule context. But I still don't like that in a tertiary context. Maybe "principal" would be all right for a "Fachoberschule", but not "Fachhochschule".

So, I've ended up opting for "vice-chancellor". Dan was basically first in with the "right" answer and gave a helpful explanation of the difference between Vice-Chancellor and Chancellor (though these offices are very similar in New Zealand universities). So he edges out Steffen. Commiserations, Steffen, but thank you for your help. And thanks to everyone else who contributed as well.

I'll leave this out of the glossary, because there are several possible solutions depending on the context, and in some cases, it seems to be a bit up the in air.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Kiltz
4 mins

agree  Yoshiro Shibasaki, PhD
55 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
vice chancellor


Explanation:
This is what corresponds to a Rektor in Britain (don't know about the US of A).

David Kiltz
Local time: 00:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: snap
1 min
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the following from the Oxford Duden


Explanation:
Rektor / "rEktOr /
der; Rektors, Rektoren / -"to:r@n /
a (Schulleiter) head[master];
b (Universitätsrektor) Rector; þ Vice-Chancellor (Brit.); (einer
Fachhochschule) principal

If it's a school, headteacher, please, (principal in the US) but it looks as if you want Vice-Chancellor as others have already said.

jkjones
Local time: 23:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Dean


Explanation:
in the US. Universities and colleges, though, are run by a "board of governors" with a "president", while the various departments (medicine, law etc) are led by a department chairman.

gangels
Local time: 16:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 84

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Beth Kantus: except the university is run by a president and board (of trustees), the colleges are headed by deans, and the individual departments within the colleges are run by department chairs
2 hrs
  -> OK, I am not to quibble. Actually, it's "dean of the faculty"

agree  sylvie malich: I"m with you and Beth if it's to be a US-Eng. trans
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Aug 22, 2012 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)(none) » Education / Pedagogy


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search