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Raumplan

English translation: floor plan; room layout

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Raumplan
English translation:floor plan; room layout
Entered by: Rowan Morrell
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

06:41 Aug 14, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
/ Quality Assurance
German term or phrase: Raumplan
Appears in a list of documents as the title of one of the documents:

"Raumplan Produktion [product name]"

I don't think this is the same as "Raumplanung". The dictionaries have "Raumplanung", but not one that I possess or can access has "Raumplan". (It's the sort of word you'd think they would have.) Would it be something like "floor plan"? I'm fairly sure that's what it is, but not totally. Hoping someone here is a bit more certain about it. Thanks in advance for clearing this one up.
Rowan Morrell
Local time: 16:24
floor plan
Explanation:
would be my initial understanding of "Raumplan".

HTH

Alison
Selected response from:

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 06:24
Grading comment
It was extremely tough to decide between "floor plan" and "room layout". In the end, Klaus' agreement with Alison, plus additional research that I did, tilted me in favour of "floor plan". However, I believe both options are suitable for "Raumplan".

Interestingly, Laixicon translates "Grundriß" as "layout" as well as "floor plan", which makes me think Grundriß and Raumplan are largely synonymous in German. I actually found one site that translated Raumplan as "floor plan", but none that translated it as "room layout". (One or two other sites called it "space plan" or "spatial plan", but that sounded a little odd, though not far from the Ernst "floor space plan".) I also looked up "production floor plan" and "production room layout", and the results that I got seemed to support what Klaus said and further inclined me to go with "floor plan".

It comes down to what fits the context, and I felt that, at the end of the day, "floor plan" fit this particular context a little better than "room layout". However, I think "room layout" would work quite well in many, maybe even most other contexts.

So well done Alison (though a point off for lack of hard evidence to support your solution), and commiserations Edward, the "hard-luck loser" on this occasion. But thank you very much for your efforts, in particular your explanation of the difference in English between "floor plan" and "room layout". And I am putting your solution in the glossary along with Alison's. Thanks also to the others who took the time to contribute.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5room layout
Edward L. Crosby III
4 +1floor plan
Alison Schwitzgebel
4layout plan
Mats Wiman
3 +1floor space plan
John Jory


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
floor plan


Explanation:
would be my initial understanding of "Raumplan".

HTH

Alison

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3403
Grading comment
It was extremely tough to decide between "floor plan" and "room layout". In the end, Klaus' agreement with Alison, plus additional research that I did, tilted me in favour of "floor plan". However, I believe both options are suitable for "Raumplan".

Interestingly, Laixicon translates "Grundriß" as "layout" as well as "floor plan", which makes me think Grundriß and Raumplan are largely synonymous in German. I actually found one site that translated Raumplan as "floor plan", but none that translated it as "room layout". (One or two other sites called it "space plan" or "spatial plan", but that sounded a little odd, though not far from the Ernst "floor space plan".) I also looked up "production floor plan" and "production room layout", and the results that I got seemed to support what Klaus said and further inclined me to go with "floor plan".

It comes down to what fits the context, and I felt that, at the end of the day, "floor plan" fit this particular context a little better than "room layout". However, I think "room layout" would work quite well in many, maybe even most other contexts.

So well done Alison (though a point off for lack of hard evidence to support your solution), and commiserations Edward, the "hard-luck loser" on this occasion. But thank you very much for your efforts, in particular your explanation of the difference in English between "floor plan" and "room layout". And I am putting your solution in the glossary along with Alison's. Thanks also to the others who took the time to contribute.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels: since it involves production, you wouldn't call it room layout, but floor plan as you did, or shop floor plan
5 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
room layout


Explanation:
That's what it sounds like -- a diagram showing the placement of items in the room, as opposed to a "floor plan", which would show how the different rooms in a building are associated with one another (like the floor plan of your house, for example).

See the illustration on the New Zealand Web page http://ttg.its.waikato.ac.nz/teaching/tr/trlayout.htm (TTG Training Room Layout).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-14 06:52:49 (GMT)
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16,899 other Google hits for \"room layout\"

Edward L. Crosby III
Local time: 21:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 527

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elvira Stoianov: I am currently translating "floor plan" as Grundriss, so room layout seems to be a better solution
13 mins
  -> "Grundriß ("ß" please!) is what I most often equate with "floor plan". Thanks!

agree  Gunilla Zedigh
36 mins
  -> Thanks, Gunilla.

agree  Gillian Scheibelein: übrigens, Grundriss = new Rechtschreibung
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Gillian. The F.A.Z. and I do not approve of the new Rechtschreibreform. :)

agree  Bob Kerns
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Robert.

agree  Steffen Walter
4 hrs
  -> Thanks again, Steffen.
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
floor space plan


Explanation:
From Ernst

John Jory
Germany
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3390

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels: not wrong, but floor plan is OK. Everyone knows that it concerns footage
4 hrs
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
layout plan


Explanation:
is how I understand it.
It's slightly wider than 'floor plan' which is more one-dimensional

layout plan is 'dispositionsplan' in Swedish


    Engstrm eng-swe+MW
Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 1498
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