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Praxis (Stühle, Scheine)

English translation: chairs and (health) insurance certificates

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Praxis (Stühle, Scheine)
English translation:chairs and (health) insurance certificates
Entered by: EdithK
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:47 Aug 21, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
/ Dental Video Dialogue Guide
German term or phrase: Praxis (Stühle, Scheine)
This appears in a guide for a kind of video dialogue with various dentists, asking them about their experiences with some treatment type or other. The above phrase is part of the introduction to the interviewee. The interviewee's age is to be mentioned, and then his or her "Praxis (Stühle, Scheine)".

It's not at all clear to me whether "Praxis" means the person's practice (in which case the "Stühle, Scheine" could mean something like "chairs, lights") or the person's experience (in which case "Scheine" might be certificates, and "Stühle" possibly short for "Lehrstühle).

I'm kind of leaning towards the former, but would like some second opinions on the best option for "Praxis" (which would affect how "Stühle" and "Scheine" got translated). Hope there's enough context - I've tried to give as much as I can.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 01:19
chairs and (health) insurance certificates
Explanation:
The "Scheine" have meantime been replaced by chip cards, at least in Germany. But one still refers to these chip cards colloquially as "Scheine" (Ich habe xxx Scheine in diesem Quartal). Just "certificates" would be too general as these could refer to other things. In my mother's surgery, there used to be boxes full of these (health) insurance certificates.

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Note added at 2002-08-21 12:29:39 (GMT)
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This is also shortened to \"insurance certs\".
Selected response from:

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 15:19
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your contributions. This answer seems to be the one to go with, so well done Edith. However, the others helped a bit as well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2chairs and (health) insurance certificates
EdithK
3practice (chairs, insured clients)
Daniel Bichis
3 -1Surgery (chairs, certificates)
Mary Worby


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Surgery (chairs, certificates)


Explanation:
How about a mixture of the options? If this is a video presentation, you can imagine the camera panning around the surgery, taking in the chairs and the framed certificates on the walls ...

HTH

Mary

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Note added at 2002-08-21 10:58:00 (GMT)
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If it\'s the dialogue instead of the camera shots, it could just be an indication of the size of the practice (no. of chairs) and the qualifications of the people involved (certificates).

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  EdithK: Scheine does not refer to qualifications but number of patients covered by health insurance
22 mins
  -> OK! That would make sense - ties in with the chairs as indicative of the size of the practice ...
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
chairs and (health) insurance certificates


Explanation:
The "Scheine" have meantime been replaced by chip cards, at least in Germany. But one still refers to these chip cards colloquially as "Scheine" (Ich habe xxx Scheine in diesem Quartal). Just "certificates" would be too general as these could refer to other things. In my mother's surgery, there used to be boxes full of these (health) insurance certificates.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-21 12:29:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This is also shortened to \"insurance certs\".

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 15:19
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9172
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your contributions. This answer seems to be the one to go with, so well done Edith. However, the others helped a bit as well.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  allemande
1 hr
  -> Thanks

neutral  gangels: Krankenschein is more of a "treatment approval slip" not a certificate
2 hrs
  -> It is indeed but it is still called an insurance cert

agree  writeaway: but I think the term is slips, not certificates
4 hrs
  -> Thanks. Non-private patients have these slips colloqually called certs, private patients usually have to sign a doctor's slip which is not issued by the health inusrances
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
practice (chairs, insured clients)


Explanation:
"Praxis" is the convivial term for "practice", surgery is not used for dental doctors!
And "Scheine" is, also, convivial for "health insurance certificates"
So, in three words, the reporter asked for a general picture of the size and activity of his interlocutor

Daniel Bichis
Romania
Local time: 16:19
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 22

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  EdithK: The term dental surgery definitively exists.
50 mins
  -> OK, but is not the case here - in a dental surgery clinic, you have much more than chairs and lights!

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: surgery is also used in UK, not US
8 hrs
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