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sperren (in quality assurance context)

English translation: to reject

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:sperren (in quality assurance context)
English translation:to reject
Entered by: Rowan Morrell
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06:52 Oct 22, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
/ Quality Assurance
German term or phrase: sperren (in quality assurance context)
This word drives me to distraction in quality assurance texts, and I'd really like something definitive on it.

Here's an example of it in my current text:

"Waren, die geprüft und als fehlerhaft erkannt werden, sind auszusondern und erhalten den Status „GESPERRT“."

Now, what I'd really like to know for sure is: are defective goods actually "blocked"? Is this standard QA jargon? Or does "sperren" have another specific meaning in this context?

I did find a bilingual QA glossary once where "sperren" was translated as "quarantine". However, in the text I'm currently doing, "sperren" and "Quarantäne" are two distinct concepts. So "quarantine" will not work as a translation for "sperren" here.

I have considered possibilities like "reject" or maybe even "hold", but can find no dictionary evidence to support these as translations for "sperren" (and I've looked in quite a few different places).

Would appreciate responses from people with some experience with QA material. If I could nail down a translation of "sperren" once and for all, it would probably help me with things like "Sperrschein" and "Sperrvermerk" as well. TIA for your assistance.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 22:30
rejected
Explanation:
In your present context "rejected" is the only possibility as the goods are "als fehlerhaft erkannt".
I can give you no dictionary reference for this, but,from my own experience of QA in "real life" I can tell you that this is certainly the right word.
Selected response from:

transatgees
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:30
Grading comment
Rejected is what I went with in the end. Jonathan is a little unlucky here, because he did suggest "rejected" (so I hope you're not feeling too, uh, rejected, Jonathan!), but it was a bit of an afterthought, whereas this answer was a little more convincing about why "rejected" is the way to go.



I don't think "quarantining" can be ruled out as a translation in some contexts, but it looks like "reject" is the solution in general for "sperren" in a QA context. So thanks very much for that, and my sincerist thanks also to the other contributors. Appreciate your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5rejectedtransatgees
3quarantined
Jonathan MacKerron
2bar
Mary Worby


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quarantined


Explanation:
is what I've used

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Note added at 2002-10-22 07:27:19 (GMT)
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\"certificate of quarantine\"
\"designated as quarantined\"

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Note added at 2002-10-22 07:31:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Within a production framework there is not distinct difference between sperren and Quarantäne, both infer that certain items are weeded out to be either thrown away, stored, recycled of whatever.

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Note added at 2002-10-22 07:41:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Then I guess either \"excluded, banned, or rejected\" might work?

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5577
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
rejected


Explanation:
In your present context "rejected" is the only possibility as the goods are "als fehlerhaft erkannt".
I can give you no dictionary reference for this, but,from my own experience of QA in "real life" I can tell you that this is certainly the right word.

transatgees
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:30
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 768
Grading comment
Rejected is what I went with in the end. Jonathan is a little unlucky here, because he did suggest "rejected" (so I hope you're not feeling too, uh, rejected, Jonathan!), but it was a bit of an afterthought, whereas this answer was a little more convincing about why "rejected" is the way to go.<br><br>

I don't think "quarantining" can be ruled out as a translation in some contexts, but it looks like "reject" is the solution in general for "sperren" in a QA context. So thanks very much for that, and my sincerist thanks also to the other contributors. Appreciate your help.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
bar


Explanation:
On the basis that a QA glossary I have (provided by a customer) has 'barred' for gesperrt.

Unfortunately, I can't find any sort of corroboration, but it may be an option if you need something specifically different to quarantining.

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770
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