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Denkbemühung

English translation: mental endeavour

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Denkbemühung
English translation:mental endeavour
Entered by: silvia glatzhofer
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

16:25 Feb 23, 2009
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Philosophy / Ethik
German term or phrase: Denkbemühung
Powerpointfolie in einem Vortrag über Kapitalmarktethik, Definition von Ethik

Ethik als die Denkbemühung, die das Moralische reflektiert
Frage nach der Möglichkeit einer guten Moral, nach der wir gut leben, gerecht handeln und vernünftig über unser Handeln und Leben entscheiden oder urteilen können
silvia glatzhofer
Local time: 23:50
mental endeavour
Explanation:
I think I would go for this. Or 'cognitive endeavour'.

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Note added at 38 mins (2009-02-23 17:03:32 GMT)
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This translation of Spinoza's 'Ethics' used 'the mind's endeavour' and 'mental endeavour':
E3: PROP. 21. He who conceives, that the object of his love is affected pleasurably or painfully, will himself be affected pleasurably or painfully; and the one or the other emotion will be greater or less in the lover according as it is greater or less in the thing loved.
Proof.--The images of things (as we showed in E3P19) which postulate the existence of the object of love, help the mind's endeavour to conceive the said object. But pleasure postulates the existence of something feeling pleasure, so much the more in proportion as the emotion of pleasure is greater; for it is (E3P11N) a transition to a greater perfection; therefore the image of pleasure in the object of love helps the mental endeavour of the lover; that is, it affects the lover pleasurably, and so much the more, in proportion as this emotion may have been greater in the object of love. This was our first point.
Further, in so far as a thing is affected with pain, it is to that extent destroyed, the extent being in proportion to the amount of pain (E3P11N); therefore (E3P19) he who conceives, that the object of his love is affected painfully, will himself be affected painfully, in proportion as the said emotion is greater or less in the object of love. Q.E.D.
http://home.earthlink.net/~tneff/e3d.htm



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Note added at 40 mins (2009-02-23 17:05:53 GMT)
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The mental endeavour to reflect upon the moral ...

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Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-23 17:13:42 GMT)
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Ethics has traditionally been taught in the 'ivory towers' of academia. Recent develop ments and reforms in nurse education have given ethics a prominent position in most curricula. However, the vast majority of ethics teaching continues to take place in academic departments. This approach fuels the practitioner's views that nursing is a pragmatic activity whilst ethics is a cognitive endeavour; such perspectives entrench ethics firmly in the traditional gap between theory and practice. The focus of this paper presents an argument that the teaching of ethics must be versed in clinical reality if bridges are ever to be built and the theory-practice gap crossed.
http://nej.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/1/1/35

http://books.google.com/books?id=E_U3AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA120&lpg=P...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2009-02-23 20:40:43 GMT)
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This is about ethics being the mental endeavour to determine, to reflect upon what is moral, what might comprise morality, in my view. Any action is, indeed, mental, i.e. of the mind.

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Note added at 9 days (2009-03-04 16:56:39 GMT) Post-grading
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Thanks for the points, silvia
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:50
Grading comment
danke
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6mental endeavour
Helen Shiner
4 +3intellectual endeavour or pursuit
Bruce Sanchez
3 +1thinking effort
Bernhard Sulzer
3 +1philosophical effort
Inge Meinzer


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
philosophical effort


Explanation:
as a start of what I am sure to be many entries


    Reference: http://ann.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/450/1/165
Inge Meinzer
United States
Local time: 14:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator): nicht wörtlich und doch treffend übersetzt!!
17 hrs
  -> Vielen Dank, Harald!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
thinking effort


Explanation:
or:
act(ion) of thinking / reasoning
thinking act

focusing on the important role the act of (intensive) thinking, reasoning, reflection plays as opposed to any mental activity.

http://books.google.com/books?id=917bSXOJRjcC&pg=PA115&lpg=P...
thinking effort / act


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2009-02-23 20:19:43 GMT)
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corr: activity/ act of thinking , not action...

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 17:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Murad AWAD: Agree
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
intellectual endeavour or pursuit


Explanation:
In the field of philosophy ethics is seen more as a concern of reason and intellect then of mind in general. Ethics is a pursuit of the laws and rules (if any) of right and wrong, good and bad by the activity of reason and intellect not a generic "mental" activity. While "thinking", "philosophical" and "mental" may all be acceptable glosses, i believe "intellectual" or even "rational" endeavour or pursuit is more in keeping with the philosophical sense of ethics.

Bruce Sanchez
Local time: 14:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  casper: You've convinced me, Bruce :)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

neutral  Helen Shiner: It really depends on what it is being contrasted with within the context. But I think 'intellectual' puts the wrong stress on it; I would not disagree with 'of the intellect' but for me 'mental' sounds fine in all the links I provide.
5 hrs

agree  lirka: I like it :)
8 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
10 hrs
  -> thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
mental endeavour


Explanation:
I think I would go for this. Or 'cognitive endeavour'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2009-02-23 17:03:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This translation of Spinoza's 'Ethics' used 'the mind's endeavour' and 'mental endeavour':
E3: PROP. 21. He who conceives, that the object of his love is affected pleasurably or painfully, will himself be affected pleasurably or painfully; and the one or the other emotion will be greater or less in the lover according as it is greater or less in the thing loved.
Proof.--The images of things (as we showed in E3P19) which postulate the existence of the object of love, help the mind's endeavour to conceive the said object. But pleasure postulates the existence of something feeling pleasure, so much the more in proportion as the emotion of pleasure is greater; for it is (E3P11N) a transition to a greater perfection; therefore the image of pleasure in the object of love helps the mental endeavour of the lover; that is, it affects the lover pleasurably, and so much the more, in proportion as this emotion may have been greater in the object of love. This was our first point.
Further, in so far as a thing is affected with pain, it is to that extent destroyed, the extent being in proportion to the amount of pain (E3P11N); therefore (E3P19) he who conceives, that the object of his love is affected painfully, will himself be affected painfully, in proportion as the said emotion is greater or less in the object of love. Q.E.D.
http://home.earthlink.net/~tneff/e3d.htm



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 mins (2009-02-23 17:05:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The mental endeavour to reflect upon the moral ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-23 17:13:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ethics has traditionally been taught in the 'ivory towers' of academia. Recent develop ments and reforms in nurse education have given ethics a prominent position in most curricula. However, the vast majority of ethics teaching continues to take place in academic departments. This approach fuels the practitioner's views that nursing is a pragmatic activity whilst ethics is a cognitive endeavour; such perspectives entrench ethics firmly in the traditional gap between theory and practice. The focus of this paper presents an argument that the teaching of ethics must be versed in clinical reality if bridges are ever to be built and the theory-practice gap crossed.
http://nej.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/1/1/35

http://books.google.com/books?id=E_U3AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA120&lpg=P...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2009-02-23 20:40:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This is about ethics being the mental endeavour to determine, to reflect upon what is moral, what might comprise morality, in my view. Any action is, indeed, mental, i.e. of the mind.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 days (2009-03-04 16:56:39 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the points, silvia

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
danke

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anne Schulz
38 mins
  -> Thanks, Anne

agree  Nastassja K
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Nastassja

agree  gangels: ethics as mental conduit reflecting that which is moral (seems to be a bit more to the point)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, gangels - but I think reflektieren here must mean to reflect upon.

agree  ventnai
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ian

agree  Anne-Marie Grant: Definitely the best of the suggested options.
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Anne-Marie

agree  Gunilla Zedigh
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Gunilla
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Feb 23, 2009 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Social Sciences


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