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Larve

English translation: larva, pupa

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Larve
English translation:larva, pupa
Entered by: Mustafa Er (BSc MA)
Options:
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12:37 Nov 7, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
German term or phrase: Larve
Here's another term from the book.....

"Vor zwei Wochen hat sich hier auf der Wiese eine Larve in einen niedlichen Käfer verwandelt"

It's a children's book (for 2-4yr olds) and
although I know that

"larve" = "larva or grub"

in English, this might be difficult for small children to understand.
Does anyone know a good alternative? TIA
Z.E. Ball
Local time: 05:17
larva, pupa
Explanation:
early wingless stage of an insect (Entomology)
Selected response from:

Mustafa Er (BSc MA)
Turkey
Local time: 06:17
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6larva, pupa
Mustafa Er (BSc MA)
3 +1rewordKen Cox
3 +1a little worm-like thing
Paul Cohen
2 +2baby beetle/insectxxxFrancis Lee
3maggot
Henry Schroeder
2 -1caterpillar
BirgitBerlin


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
caterpillar


Explanation:
There is this book about the hungry caterpillar. This changes into a butterfly though, not a bug.

BirgitBerlin
Germany
Local time: 05:17
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Steven Sidore: a larva is NOT a caterpillar
1 min
  -> I know that (see my comment). But this is for poetic reasons as it doesn't sound as "disgusting" to children.

neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: This COULD be an option here e.g. "baby caterpillar" (even if it's inaccurate here)
20 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
larva, pupa


Explanation:
early wingless stage of an insect (Entomology)

Mustafa Er (BSc MA)
Turkey
Local time: 06:17
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Denise DeVries: If you use the proper word, the child will learn it.
11 mins
  -> thank you

neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: Perhaps you didn't read the specific question from the Asker? / So why didn't you say that initially? And what kind of "explanation in brackets"? Your suggestion merely repeated what the Asker already knew, so how was that helpful?
12 mins
  -> I think you should stick to the proper word with maybe an explanation in brackets

agree  Amira El-Wattar: An insect in the inactive stage of development intermediate between larva and adult
32 mins
  -> thank you

agree  svenfrade: I think "larva" is fine. Gives the parents the opportunity to explain a new word;-) My daughter soaked up new vocabulary happily at that age.
41 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Rebecca Garber: I think larva would work well. Esp. for the group of kids who are into bugs.
3 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  mill2
3 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  seehand: mit inkweaver
19 hrs
  -> thank you
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
baby beetle/insect


Explanation:
You are understandably aware that not all children this young would know what "larvae" etc. are. Perhaps you could say:

- a baby insect turned into a cute beetle

Hmmm .... I'm not convinced myself, but it's an idea ...

To a child, a larva would look like a "baby worm" - you could use that, except parents might consider it confusing.

xxxFrancis Lee
Local time: 05:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Sidore: 'worm' was my thought too, if forced to make this kind of substitution (and like Denise, I feel the real word should be used)
9 mins

agree  Paul Cohen: I have no problem describing a larva as a worm-like thing - but not as a "baby worm". That'll just confuse the little tykes - and some of their parents! / I'm a big fan of the worm element.
24 mins
  -> Not sure, but I see you're OK with the "worm" element, then? ;-)
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a little worm-like thing


Explanation:
... a little worm-like thing turned into a beetle."

And later on, when they go to school, they'll learn that this "worm-like thing" is called... ;-)

Paul Cohen
Greenland
Local time: 01:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ingeborg Gowans: yes, I think you have to tread carefully here; depending on the exact age and understanding of the children in question
1 hr
  -> Yes, no harm in giving kids a bit of biology without all the terminology.
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
maggot


Explanation:
Larva is an absurd word for a children's book in america. Maggot is much more suitable.

A maggot turned into a fly???

I'm not to sure about this area. Can a maggot turn into a beattle?

Maggot is very common in america.

Henry Schroeder
United States
Local time: 23:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: Strictly speaking, maggots turn into flies etc. and are associated with decaying food. BUT I'd still consider it an option here. / Well, I did have a sneaking suspicion re. decaying food, but I admit I had to consult a dict. for confirmation. ;-)
4 mins
  -> That's what I read at wikipedia too :-) or did you actually know it?
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
reword


Explanation:
If the audience is 2-year-olds, another option is to say 'a little beetle crawled out of its cocoon'. Most likely the word will still have to be explained (and probably Larve as well to German 2-year-olds), but the person reading the story (!) will probably find it easier to explain 'cocoon' than 'larva'.

Ken Cox
Local time: 05:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxFrancis Lee: Good idea
1 hr
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Changes made by editors
Nov 15, 2007 - Changes made by Mustafa Er (BSc MA):
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/647682">Z.E. Ball's</a> old entry - "Larve" » "larva, pupa"


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