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Blattausreissfestigkeit

English translation: page-pull strength

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18:27 Jan 8, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Printing & Publishing / printing
German term or phrase: Blattausreissfestigkeit
Contained in a text about printing technology, offset printing, etc.
TransEng
English translation:page-pull strength
Explanation:
I haven't been able to spot a glossary giving a definition, but some web hits:

... Whereas the page pull strength of a sewn binding is the strength of the paper, the
page pull strength of an adhesive binding tends to be that of the adhesive. ...
www.temperproductions.com/flexible_strength.htm

Glue Choices In The Bindery
... The industry standard for page pull strength is 2.5 pounds per linear inch, which
means that a page in a book with an 11” binding edge must withstand at ...
www.seaboardbindery.com/TA-0104-GlueChoices.htm

The page-pull strength is tested using a page-pull test, and that one I found in a glossary: http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/don/dt/dt2439.html

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Note added at 2003-01-08 21:09:02 (GMT)
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\'to pull or tear a page out of the binding\'. Absolutely. The reason why I would suggest using pull instead of tear is that it doesn\'t work the other way around - we don\'t say pull to tear a sheet of paper.

Which leaves us with pull-out strength - isn\'t that more of a mechanical term used for screws and stuff like that? I checked on pull-out strength before submitting my suggestion. All I found was one single hit relating to paper and binding. (www.speedbind.com/feat/).
Selected response from:

Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 21:20
Grading comment
Many thanks for the information and for the excellent references - very useful. Quite a discussions I started with this question!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2tear strenght of sheet
Hermann
4 +1page-pull strength
Klaus Herrmann
3still not sure about tear resistance/strength
Cilian O'Tuama


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tear strenght of sheet


Explanation:
i would say

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Note added at 2003-01-08 18:46:54 (GMT)
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for tapes you find \'easy tear\' tapes - so I assume yours refers to how easy or difficult the page can be torn from the binding

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Note added at 2003-01-08 18:59:45 (GMT)
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of course - tear streng*th* of sheet



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Note added at 2003-01-08 20:03:32 (GMT)
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the site
http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/don/dt/dt2439.html


identified by Klaus does give a clear description of the issue in hand and you can clearly read that the authors are referring to \'pull or tear a page out of the binding\'.

In English we happen to say to pull a page out of a book or to tear a page out of a book - both are correct.

As fas as the strength is concerened I am sure the same applies here.

Cheers

Norbert

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Note added at 2003-01-08 20:12:39 (GMT)
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If we were to look at the tearing of the page itself you would find sheet / page break used.

As there seems to be a difference of opinions my advice to the asker would be

use \'tear-out strength\' or \'pull-out strength\' of sheet /paper


Hermann
Local time: 20:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johannes Gleim: me too
2 mins
  -> thanks again :-)

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: I initially thought so too, but would that not just be Blattreissf.? Term requested sounds like resistance to being pulled out of printer. (BTW strengTH) :-)
5 mins
  -> Blattreisf. would be sheet break resistance

agree  Nicole Tata: yes, paper tear strength or resistance sounds good
21 mins
  -> thanks

neutral  Klaus Herrmann: Cilian is right, cf. http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/don/dt/dt3459.html
1 hr
  -> in the text yopu pointed out it reads 'to tear or pull a leave out of it's binding' - tear and pull are used for the same thing here
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55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
still not sure about tear resistance/strength


Explanation:
Internet research yielded:

Tear strength
A measure of how likely a paper will continue to tear once started. Tear strength test determines the tearing resistance of paper. Tear strength will be different with and against the grain of paper.

Tear resistance
This is defined as the average force in grams required to tear a single sheet of paper after the tear has been started.

Maybe wait for Klaus Herrmann to come along. He's the expert on this.


Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 21:20
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 35
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
page-pull strength


Explanation:
I haven't been able to spot a glossary giving a definition, but some web hits:

... Whereas the page pull strength of a sewn binding is the strength of the paper, the
page pull strength of an adhesive binding tends to be that of the adhesive. ...
www.temperproductions.com/flexible_strength.htm

Glue Choices In The Bindery
... The industry standard for page pull strength is 2.5 pounds per linear inch, which
means that a page in a book with an 11” binding edge must withstand at ...
www.seaboardbindery.com/TA-0104-GlueChoices.htm

The page-pull strength is tested using a page-pull test, and that one I found in a glossary: http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/don/dt/dt2439.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 21:09:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\'to pull or tear a page out of the binding\'. Absolutely. The reason why I would suggest using pull instead of tear is that it doesn\'t work the other way around - we don\'t say pull to tear a sheet of paper.

Which leaves us with pull-out strength - isn\'t that more of a mechanical term used for screws and stuff like that? I checked on pull-out strength before submitting my suggestion. All I found was one single hit relating to paper and binding. (www.speedbind.com/feat/).


    Reference: http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/don/dt/dt2439.html
Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 21:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 258
Grading comment
Many thanks for the information and for the excellent references - very useful. Quite a discussions I started with this question!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hermann: tear and pull are used for the same thing in the same text you pointed out - I believe this is not a tied fast expression pull or tear both are correct
25 mins
  -> tear is ambiguous, pull is not.
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