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whole sentence

English translation: extensive regulations

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20:00 Jul 12, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Science
German term or phrase: whole sentence
Die Landschaftsplanung ist in Kombination von Bundesnaturschutzgesetz und weiteren Regelungen mit einer starken Regelungsdichte ausgestattet.

Does this mean: "Landscape planning is subject to strict regulation through a combination of the German Nature Preservation Act and other regulations" ??
William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 07:17
English translation:extensive regulations
Explanation:
My feeling is that "Regelungsdichte" describes the huge number of regulations rather than their stringency.
HTH Ute
Selected response from:

Ute Wietfeld
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:17
Grading comment
Thanks, everybody. Fred's solution would be suitable in a different article but I think it might be a bit too pejorative in this context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3strict regulation
Friedrich Reinold
4 +2is equipped with a plethora of regulations
Dr. Fred Thomson
4 +1extensive regulations
Ute Wietfeld
4commentKen Cox
4is buried under a thick web of regulationsgangels


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
strict regulation


Explanation:
Yes, you got the correct meaning of this "paper German".

Friedrich Reinold
United States
Local time: 06:17
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 188

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: or 'is tightly regulated by the combination of...'
5 mins

agree  wrtransco: strictly regulated by
36 mins

agree  Karsten2: sounds better than in German
2 days18 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
extensive regulations


Explanation:
My feeling is that "Regelungsdichte" describes the huge number of regulations rather than their stringency.
HTH Ute

Ute Wietfeld
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:17
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 90
Grading comment
Thanks, everybody. Fred's solution would be suitable in a different article but I think it might be a bit too pejorative in this context.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  stefana
22 hrs
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
is equipped with a plethora of regulations


Explanation:
or: comes with a plethora of regulations
or: is burdened by a plethora (or thicket) of regulations

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-13 18:28:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Actually, I believe that \"Regelungsdicht\" all but directly implies the \"burdening,\" but you could simply say \" is subject to a plethora (or load, or thicket, or pile, or stack or large quantity or mass or s. potfull.)
But I think plethora is not too esoteric a word to be used here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-13 18:29:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops, RegelungsdichtE.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 07:17
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: sorry, I have to withdraw my previous comment -- 'burdened by a dense thicket / plethora of regulatons' is perfect of
10 mins
  -> Thanks, Kenneth.

neutral  Tom Funke: (I'd stick closer to common usage) Tom
11 mins
  -> Why?

neutral  Ulrike Lieder: I'm afraid that's reading something into the German that's not necessarily there, espec. the suggestion of "burdened".
2 hrs
  -> You're right. My subjectevtive reaction.

agree  jkjones: definitely volume rather than stringency
11 hrs
  -> Right. Thanks.

neutral  Ute Wietfeld: I agree with Ulrike - I think the German is far more neutral then "burdened" or "buried under" (below).
18 hrs
  -> How about "subjected to"?
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
is buried under a thick web of regulations


Explanation:
Landscape planning, in conjunction with the Federal Nature Preservation Act and other laws, finds itself buried under a thick web of regulations

The use of "law" avoids the annoying repeat of "regulation". For "preservation", you can substitute "protection", of course, but the US has their own "preservation act".

gangels
Local time: 07:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 5465
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21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
comment


Explanation:
OK, I can agree that the German does not say 'burdened'; 'is confronted by' or ' must deal with' would be more neutral options.

However, having said that I'm reconsidering the suggestion of 'strictly/tightly regulated' What I understand the sentence to mean is that the vast majority of the various aspects of landscape planning are subject to or affected by regulations. To my mind, this could be arguably be translated by 'strictly regulated' (meaning that there is a regulation for just about everything) but not 'tightly regulated' (meaning that there is very little choice of options). However, this is a fairly subtle distinction in English, and it may be that not everyone understands the terms this way, so a paraphase along the lines of my explanation of the meaning of the sentence might be the best translation.

Having said all that, it' worth remarking that 'Regelungsdichte' is bureaucratic jargon, and a Google search ("regulation density" + planning) shows that the literal English equivalent ('regulation density') is used in a number of translations of German texts that appear to be relatively good quality (professioal) translations - see e.g.:

Even in countries with a high regulation density like Austria and Germany, the average institutional level of telework regulation is usually lower than that relating to other new forms of work organisation like group work in production (see Juraszovich et al, 1999).




    Reference: http://www.telework-mirti.org/dbdocs/weisbach.doc
Ken Cox
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5905
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