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Säureklären

English translation: purification of acid solutions

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Säureklären
English translation:purification of acid solutions
Entered by: Deb Phillips
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04:31 Mar 10, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Säureklären
in connection with the surface treatment and surface tension of light alloys

could this be acid degreasing?

TIA
gwolf
Local time: 21:12
purification of acid solutions
Explanation:
Purification of acid solutions - Here is some more general information I found on the Web.

Aqueous Cleaners
As implied by the name, the major component in aqueous cleaners is water, which may be combined with additives such as surfactants, saponifiers, and anti-foaming agents to enhance its cleaning capabilities. Aqueous cleaners can work both physically and chemically to clean a substrate. They can physically move the contaminant from the substrate surface or dissolve the contaminant and float it away from the substrate. The four basic steps in an aqueous cleaning system are: washing, rinsing, drying, and wastewater treatment and storage. This report will address aqueous cleaners, material compatibility, wastewater treatment, and regulatory concerns. Information pertaining to aqueous cleaning technologies (processes and equipment) and regulatory information can be found in other Environmental Information Analysis (EIA) Technology Reports.
Aqueous cleaners are generally used for degreasing metal parts, removing carbon from engines, and removing flux from electronic components and printed circuit boards. They are also used to spot clean parts and to precision clean hydraulic system lines, oxygen lines, and inertial guidance components. Aqueous cleaners can remove ionic residues, inorganic and polar contaminants, and organic oils and greases. However, aqueous cleaners may not be effective in removing certain coating greases from substrates and do not remove some types of conformal coating.


Aqueous Cleaners
Aqueous cleaners can be alkaline, neutral, or acidic. The type of aqueous cleaner utilized for a particular cleaning application depends on both the substrate and the contaminant. Aqueous cleaners are often referred to as detergents or soaps. The term detergent refers to cleaners that are made from petroleum products, while the term soap refers to cleaners made from fatty acids. However, these terms are often used interchangeably to describe any aqueous cleaner.

Acidic Cleaners

Acidic cleaners are a combination of acids (mineral acids, organic acids, or acid salts), water, wetting agents, detergents, and inhibitors with a pH less than 7. They are used to remove oil, grease, shop soils, drawing compounds, light rust, and scale or to etch metal surfaces for better adhesion in subsequent coating or plating processes. Two cleaning categories associated with aqueous acid solutions are acid cleaning and acid pickling. They vary mainly in the severity of the cleaning process and are indistinguishable in some cases. Acid cleaning is generally used prior to painting, plating, or storing parts; while the more severe acid pickling process is used to remove scale and other stubborn soils. One benefit of acidic cleaning solutions is that they can be adapted to leave a light phosphate coating on parts to provide a base for subsequent coating or for temporary rust resistance if the parts are to be stored before the next processing step.

Mineral acids commonly used include chromic, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, nitric, phosphoric, and sulfuric acids. Chromic acid is a strong oxidant and is often used to rinse excess phosphate from metal surfaces in acid cleaning/phosphating systems without leaving hard water salts. It can also be used as a rinse between alkaline and acid cleaning steps to prevent acidic cleaner neutralization. Hydrochloric acid is used for batch pickling hot rolled or heat treated high-carbon steel rod and wire and continuous pickling of low- or high-carbon steel. Hydrofluoric acid accelerates pickling baths and removes sand from pickling castings. However, the most common pickling acid is sulfuric acid. Stainless steel is frequently cleaned with nitric acid. Phosphoric acid removes grease, oil, drawing compounds, and light rust.

Acetic acid, citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), formic acid, gluconic acid, hydroxyacetic acid, and oxalic acid are frequently used organic acids. Organic acids are less acidic and, therefore, less prone to cause corrosion or pitting than mineral acids. They are used in various combinations with wetting agents, solvents, polyether alcohols, antifoam agents, and inhibitors to remove grease, oil, and soil. Organic acids remove metal oxides by reacting with the metal to produce citrates, acetates, and other byproducts and releasing hydrogen. As the hydrogen builds up, the remaining oxides are lifted from the substrate, leaving a clean surface.

Acid salts such as ammonium persulfate, bifluoride salts, sodium acid sulfate, and sodium phosphates are used to remove light rust from ferrous metals. They are often used in combination with organic acids to remove soil, oil, and grease. Acid salts are also used in conjunction with fluoride salts to improve the removal efficiency of silica sand from castings.

Strong acids will etch steel and strong oxidizing agents will corrode copper, but inhibitors can be added to the cleaning solutions to control or reduce these effects. Acidic cleaners do not effectively remove heavy deposits of oil or grease without the aid of a preliminary alkaline rinse or the addition of materials such as ethylene glycol monobutyl ether. Systems which incorporate both acidic and alkaline rinses may cause metal oxide precipitates that may be deposited on the component being cleaned.


Acid anodising -
to put a protective, often colored, oxide film on (a light metal) by an electrolytic process in which the metal serves as the anode

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-10 05:19:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

acid cleansing - I am just guessing! I don\'t really understand, and there is not too much information. Why don\'t you post the whole sentence?
Selected response from:

Deb Phillips
Grading comment
Thanks for the info!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4acid filtrationHansBecker
4could beNancy Schmeing
4purification of acid solutionsDeb Phillips


  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
purification of acid solutions


Explanation:
Purification of acid solutions - Here is some more general information I found on the Web.

Aqueous Cleaners
As implied by the name, the major component in aqueous cleaners is water, which may be combined with additives such as surfactants, saponifiers, and anti-foaming agents to enhance its cleaning capabilities. Aqueous cleaners can work both physically and chemically to clean a substrate. They can physically move the contaminant from the substrate surface or dissolve the contaminant and float it away from the substrate. The four basic steps in an aqueous cleaning system are: washing, rinsing, drying, and wastewater treatment and storage. This report will address aqueous cleaners, material compatibility, wastewater treatment, and regulatory concerns. Information pertaining to aqueous cleaning technologies (processes and equipment) and regulatory information can be found in other Environmental Information Analysis (EIA) Technology Reports.
Aqueous cleaners are generally used for degreasing metal parts, removing carbon from engines, and removing flux from electronic components and printed circuit boards. They are also used to spot clean parts and to precision clean hydraulic system lines, oxygen lines, and inertial guidance components. Aqueous cleaners can remove ionic residues, inorganic and polar contaminants, and organic oils and greases. However, aqueous cleaners may not be effective in removing certain coating greases from substrates and do not remove some types of conformal coating.


Aqueous Cleaners
Aqueous cleaners can be alkaline, neutral, or acidic. The type of aqueous cleaner utilized for a particular cleaning application depends on both the substrate and the contaminant. Aqueous cleaners are often referred to as detergents or soaps. The term detergent refers to cleaners that are made from petroleum products, while the term soap refers to cleaners made from fatty acids. However, these terms are often used interchangeably to describe any aqueous cleaner.

Acidic Cleaners

Acidic cleaners are a combination of acids (mineral acids, organic acids, or acid salts), water, wetting agents, detergents, and inhibitors with a pH less than 7. They are used to remove oil, grease, shop soils, drawing compounds, light rust, and scale or to etch metal surfaces for better adhesion in subsequent coating or plating processes. Two cleaning categories associated with aqueous acid solutions are acid cleaning and acid pickling. They vary mainly in the severity of the cleaning process and are indistinguishable in some cases. Acid cleaning is generally used prior to painting, plating, or storing parts; while the more severe acid pickling process is used to remove scale and other stubborn soils. One benefit of acidic cleaning solutions is that they can be adapted to leave a light phosphate coating on parts to provide a base for subsequent coating or for temporary rust resistance if the parts are to be stored before the next processing step.

Mineral acids commonly used include chromic, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, nitric, phosphoric, and sulfuric acids. Chromic acid is a strong oxidant and is often used to rinse excess phosphate from metal surfaces in acid cleaning/phosphating systems without leaving hard water salts. It can also be used as a rinse between alkaline and acid cleaning steps to prevent acidic cleaner neutralization. Hydrochloric acid is used for batch pickling hot rolled or heat treated high-carbon steel rod and wire and continuous pickling of low- or high-carbon steel. Hydrofluoric acid accelerates pickling baths and removes sand from pickling castings. However, the most common pickling acid is sulfuric acid. Stainless steel is frequently cleaned with nitric acid. Phosphoric acid removes grease, oil, drawing compounds, and light rust.

Acetic acid, citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), formic acid, gluconic acid, hydroxyacetic acid, and oxalic acid are frequently used organic acids. Organic acids are less acidic and, therefore, less prone to cause corrosion or pitting than mineral acids. They are used in various combinations with wetting agents, solvents, polyether alcohols, antifoam agents, and inhibitors to remove grease, oil, and soil. Organic acids remove metal oxides by reacting with the metal to produce citrates, acetates, and other byproducts and releasing hydrogen. As the hydrogen builds up, the remaining oxides are lifted from the substrate, leaving a clean surface.

Acid salts such as ammonium persulfate, bifluoride salts, sodium acid sulfate, and sodium phosphates are used to remove light rust from ferrous metals. They are often used in combination with organic acids to remove soil, oil, and grease. Acid salts are also used in conjunction with fluoride salts to improve the removal efficiency of silica sand from castings.

Strong acids will etch steel and strong oxidizing agents will corrode copper, but inhibitors can be added to the cleaning solutions to control or reduce these effects. Acidic cleaners do not effectively remove heavy deposits of oil or grease without the aid of a preliminary alkaline rinse or the addition of materials such as ethylene glycol monobutyl ether. Systems which incorporate both acidic and alkaline rinses may cause metal oxide precipitates that may be deposited on the component being cleaned.


Acid anodising -
to put a protective, often colored, oxide film on (a light metal) by an electrolytic process in which the metal serves as the anode

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-10 05:19:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

acid cleansing - I am just guessing! I don\'t really understand, and there is not too much information. Why don\'t you post the whole sentence?


    Reference: http://www.dppr.ctc.com/clndegre/tr050494.htm
Deb Phillips
PRO pts in pair: 77
Grading comment
Thanks for the info!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
could be


Explanation:
Ernst has a meaning of Klären as cleaning (Reinigung) also caled fining, especially for metals. Acid fining doesn't seem to exist. So your expression sounds quite likely.




Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 21:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
acid filtration


Explanation:
acid filtration

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Note added at 2002-03-10 23:20:19 (GMT)
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Without context, it\'s difficult to tell whether the acid is what\'s cleaned or what\'s cleaning.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-10 23:20:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Without context, it\'s difficult to tell whether the acid is what\'s being cleaned or what\'s being used for cleaning.

HansBecker
PRO pts in pair: 13
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