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"Stockwerk - - -"

English translation: floor (first choice) level (distant second choice)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Stockwerk
English translation:floor (first choice) level (distant second choice)
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
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19:56 May 25, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / Photocopiers
German term or phrase: "Stockwerk - - -"
Photocopiers:
This relates to photocopiers which are placed on the various floors of a company.
"Floor" and "storey" won't do it. "Floor" is open to misinterpretation and "storey" just sound strange. I have tried "area" in the past, but this is terribly weak. Any ideas anyone?
Barbara Cashin
Local time: 21:20
floor (first choice) level (distant second choice)
Explanation:
There is absolutely no problem with "floor". All you have to do is make sure that you get the numbers right. If your writing is for UK dominated English consumption, you can use the same numbers as in the German text except you call the "Erdgeschoss" the "ground floor" and, as in German, the next floor up is the "1st floor". If the writing is for US consumption, the "ground floor" may be called either "ground floor" or "1st floor" and the next floor up is the "2nd floor".

http://www.englishclub.net/vocabulary/property.htm

"Americans call the ground-level floor of a building the first floor, but the British call it the ground floor and call the floor above that (Americans’ second story) the first storey."

http://www.bartleby.com/68/49/5749.html

The words "storey" (UK) or "story" (US) would not be appropriate in this context.

You could use a popular, more modern, term "level" if you wish, but this might really be open to misinterpretation because one might think you mean "hierarchical levels" rather than "altitude levels".

HTH

Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 22:20
Grading comment
I discovered from other reference documents that the term "remote copying/printing" is used so I worked around it with this.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4floor (first choice) level (distant second choice)Dan McCrosky
4 +2level
Elisabeth Ghysels
4Levels (of building )
1964


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
level


Explanation:
or "level of the building" may be an alternative (however, I think "storey" exists to be used in some way).
Greetings,

Nikolaus

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 22:20
PRO pts in pair: 971

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  1964
3 mins

agree  Theo Bose
24 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Levels (of building )


Explanation:
perhaps Levels (of building )fits

1964
Turkey
Local time: 23:20
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in pair: 101
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
floor (first choice) level (distant second choice)


Explanation:
There is absolutely no problem with "floor". All you have to do is make sure that you get the numbers right. If your writing is for UK dominated English consumption, you can use the same numbers as in the German text except you call the "Erdgeschoss" the "ground floor" and, as in German, the next floor up is the "1st floor". If the writing is for US consumption, the "ground floor" may be called either "ground floor" or "1st floor" and the next floor up is the "2nd floor".

http://www.englishclub.net/vocabulary/property.htm

"Americans call the ground-level floor of a building the first floor, but the British call it the ground floor and call the floor above that (Americans’ second story) the first storey."

http://www.bartleby.com/68/49/5749.html

The words "storey" (UK) or "story" (US) would not be appropriate in this context.

You could use a popular, more modern, term "level" if you wish, but this might really be open to misinterpretation because one might think you mean "hierarchical levels" rather than "altitude levels".

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 22:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
I discovered from other reference documents that the term "remote copying/printing" is used so I worked around it with this.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters
1 hr

agree  Chris Rowson
6 hrs

agree  Klaus Herrmann
16 hrs

agree  Michaela Müller
19 hrs
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