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Einpolymerisieren

English translation: imbed into a polymer

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12:06 Mar 23, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / Comparative Study of Dental Attachments
German term or phrase: Einpolymerisieren
"Das Attachment ist nur auf der Prothesenseite mit einem aktiven Magnet ausgestattet. Der eingesetzte Nd-Fe-B-Magnet ist nur bedingt temperaturbeständig. Hierdurch kann es beim ***Einpolymerisieren*** zu Magnetkraftverlust führen."

From a text about a comparative study of dental attachments. They're still going on about the structure of the attachment, but they're now discussing the results as well.

Wherever I look for "Einpolymerisieren", I get those three words I have come to deeply despise, "No results found". Does anyone know the precise meaning of this word? Or can I just use "polymerise" and be done with it? TIA for your help.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 02:31
English translation:imbed into a polymer
Explanation:
magnets are metals and cannot undergo polymerisation reactions nor can they be incorporated into polymers. The only possibility I can think of is that the magent is imbedded in a polymer during polymerisation, i.e. the magnet is positioned and the monomer material is poured over/around the magnet so that it ends up imbedded in the final polymer.

Einpolymerisieren is a very unfortunate choice of word IMHO!
Selected response from:

Gillian Scheibelein
Germany
Local time: 16:31
Grading comment
The 2 may be a little harsh, but the fact is, I'm still extremely confused here. Three answers have given conflicting information, much of which is over my head (I'm a linguist, not a scientist - but scientific texts are often written in a straightforward way that makes them easy to translate - they're certainly easier than financial or legal texts! - and I take a great deal of care to ensure accuracy). Seldom have I selected an answer where I was none the wiser at the end than at the beginning as to what the right one was. With "imbedding into a polymer", I can at least make the sentence coherent, though whether this actually captures the intention of the source text author, I have absolutely no idea. So a glossary entry is well and truly out. It may be that "einpolymerisieren" is a sort of "lazy" German, used because the author couldn't be bothered saying whatever the German equivalent of "imbed in a polymer" is. But then again, as Lars said, maybe the magnet IS being polymerised into something. But I can't think of a way to make a coherent sentence out of Lars' suggestion. At least with Gillian's suggestion (and/or Cilian's), I can construct a proper English sentence, even if it may not actually be right. Of course, I'd prefer accuracy if at all possible, and it may very well be that Cilian and Gillian have interpreted it correctly. But I wish I could be more sure. Thanks anyway for your help.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4imbed into a polymer
Gillian Scheibelein
2 +1polymerised into
Lars Finsen
2suggestion
Cilian O'Tuama


  

Answers


57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
suggestion


Explanation:
if the 'attachment' you mention above is itself a polymer, then 'einpolymerisieren' would seem to mean 'to incorporate into a/the polymer'

IMO it cannot mean polymerise, as that would mean the magnet is polymerised, which makes no sense to me.

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 16:31
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 7232
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
imbed into a polymer


Explanation:
magnets are metals and cannot undergo polymerisation reactions nor can they be incorporated into polymers. The only possibility I can think of is that the magent is imbedded in a polymer during polymerisation, i.e. the magnet is positioned and the monomer material is poured over/around the magnet so that it ends up imbedded in the final polymer.

Einpolymerisieren is a very unfortunate choice of word IMHO!


Gillian Scheibelein
Germany
Local time: 16:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3469
Grading comment
The 2 may be a little harsh, but the fact is, I'm still extremely confused here. Three answers have given conflicting information, much of which is over my head (I'm a linguist, not a scientist - but scientific texts are often written in a straightforward way that makes them easy to translate - they're certainly easier than financial or legal texts! - and I take a great deal of care to ensure accuracy). Seldom have I selected an answer where I was none the wiser at the end than at the beginning as to what the right one was. With "imbedding into a polymer", I can at least make the sentence coherent, though whether this actually captures the intention of the source text author, I have absolutely no idea. So a glossary entry is well and truly out. It may be that "einpolymerisieren" is a sort of "lazy" German, used because the author couldn't be bothered saying whatever the German equivalent of "imbed in a polymer" is. But then again, as Lars said, maybe the magnet IS being polymerised into something. But I can't think of a way to make a coherent sentence out of Lars' suggestion. At least with Gillian's suggestion (and/or Cilian's), I can construct a proper English sentence, even if it may not actually be right. Of course, I'd prefer accuracy if at all possible, and it may very well be that Cilian and Gillian have interpreted it correctly. But I wish I could be more sure. Thanks anyway for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: "nor can they be incorporated into polymers"?? Incorporate can mean 'einbauen' (much the same as your imbed/embed), i.e. polymer is formed around the magnet, whereby some magnetism is lost
2 hrs
  -> sorry, I misinterpreted your comment. I thought you meant into the polymer structure and not the polymer matrix. I still think imbed is better than incorporate though
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
polymerised into


Explanation:
But this is only the literal translation. I think both Cilian and Gillian could be right, depending on the context. Magnetic materials could be molecular and possibly polymerised - there are many metallic covalent compounds. Apart from the Nd, Fe and B constituents, what is the composition of this one? And what does "hierdurch" refer to? Some heating that's been mentioned before? And what can the magnet be polymerised into?

Lars Finsen
Local time: 16:31
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cilian O'Tuama: but the problem remains as to how to make a noun out of it.
2 hrs
  -> Well, "polymerising into" is one way, but some reformulation is often advisable in such cases.
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