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Betonmilch

English translation: laitance

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Betonmilch
English translation:laitance
Entered by: Chris Hopley
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10:14 May 19, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / Installation/Construction
German term or phrase: Betonmilch
This is from a text describing the installation of switches on exposed concrete:
"Der Adapter wird zunächst plan auf die Verschalung gesetzt, so dass keine Betonmilch dazwischen laufen kann."
Is there a specific term for "Betonmilch" or would "liquid concrete" or something similar be OK
xxxIanW
Local time: 07:38
laitance
Explanation:
Funnily enough, I came across the Dutch term 'cementmelk' only a couple of days ago. This refers to a thin, milk-like layer that can form on the surface of a concrete or screed floor due to a less than optimal mixture. After a bit of digging, I discovered the Engish term is 'laitance'. Not sure if this is what is meant in your text, but worth mentioning, I thought.

Here's a definition from a site found in the Google cache:
-> "Laitance is a soupy mixture of cement, fine sand and water that accumulates on the surface when wet concrete mixes that bleed excessively are used. In structural concrete it leaves a light colored streak of poor concrete between lifts. In hydraulic structures it has a high permeability and is a source of water leakage. The laitance layer is particularly vulnerable to deterioration by freezing and thawing."
From www.graniterock.com

Another definition:
-> "Laitance
An accumulation of fine particles on the surface of fresh concrete due to an upward our [sic] outward movement of water."

and

-> "Laitance
An alkaline accumulation of fine particles on the surface of fresh concrete due to an upward movement of water."
Both from http://www.neopoxy.com/glossary.html
Selected response from:

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 07:38
Grading comment
Thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3laitance
Chris Hopley
3 +2liquid concrete
Narasimhan Raghavan
4Concrete slurry
Alan Johnson
3cement water
Robert Bennett
1concrete pasteRowan Morrell


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Concrete slurry


Explanation:
would be my suggestion for this, Ian.

Alan Johnson
Germany
Local time: 07:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3388
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
concrete paste


Explanation:
This is a guess, unfortunately, so don't pick this answer unless it gets lots of "agrees".

I'm basically thinking a little laterally. I'm not terribly familiar with the making of concrete, but a concrete paste may have a milky texture to it. So that may be what they're referring to.

Something like "concrete liquid" or "liquid concrete", as you yourself have suggested, might work just as well.

Hopefully someone else will manage to come up with the correct term. But if not, you probably won't go too far wrong with the above ideas.

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 17:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1459
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
liquid concrete


Explanation:
See:Pump Liquid Concrete,,,
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www.servicemagic.com/task/Concrete_Pumping_40194.html - 38k - Cached - Similar pages



Narasimhan Raghavan
Local time: 11:08
Native speaker of: Tamil
PRO pts in pair: 721

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore: Narasimhan and Ian, thousands of UK Googlies support your "liquid concrete"
2 hrs
  -> Thanks David

agree  Gillian Scheibelein
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Gilian
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cement water


Explanation:
K.I.S.S.

Robert Bennett
Local time: 07:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 31
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
laitance


Explanation:
Funnily enough, I came across the Dutch term 'cementmelk' only a couple of days ago. This refers to a thin, milk-like layer that can form on the surface of a concrete or screed floor due to a less than optimal mixture. After a bit of digging, I discovered the Engish term is 'laitance'. Not sure if this is what is meant in your text, but worth mentioning, I thought.

Here's a definition from a site found in the Google cache:
-> "Laitance is a soupy mixture of cement, fine sand and water that accumulates on the surface when wet concrete mixes that bleed excessively are used. In structural concrete it leaves a light colored streak of poor concrete between lifts. In hydraulic structures it has a high permeability and is a source of water leakage. The laitance layer is particularly vulnerable to deterioration by freezing and thawing."
From www.graniterock.com

Another definition:
-> "Laitance
An accumulation of fine particles on the surface of fresh concrete due to an upward our [sic] outward movement of water."

and

-> "Laitance
An alkaline accumulation of fine particles on the surface of fresh concrete due to an upward movement of water."
Both from http://www.neopoxy.com/glossary.html


    Reference: http://makeashorterlink.com/?R36352E94
    Reference: http://www.neopoxy.com/glossary.html
Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 07:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 11
Grading comment
Thanks to all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gillian Scheibelein: this is indeed the correct term, but an electrician probably wouldn't know what is meant. http://www.alkus.de/gb/html/tipps_tricks_3.html gives "concrete milk"
4 hrs
  -> The question is, would the same electrician know what "concrete milk" is? I didn't until a few days ago, although I knew the phenomenon. Thanks for the confirmation anyway!

agree  xxxblomguib: this is exactly what is meant here !(civil engineering experience)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks for the confirmation!

agree  Rowan Morrell: Nice work! I'd have picked this answer as well.
6 days
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