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Meß- u. Regelmonteur

English translation: instrument technician

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08:26 Jul 8, 2003
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Meß- u. Regelmonteur
Ausübung bis 2/98 als Meß- u. Regelmonteur bei Außenarbeiten für Ölraffinerie.
Terri Doerrzapf
Germany
Local time: 10:04
English translation:instrument technician
Explanation:
EN-GB: engineer
EN-US: technician

In the States, engineers usually have engineering degrees (4 years or more), same as Dipl.-Ing. in Germany -- and technical specialists without degrees (often field-based) are usually called technicians, same as Techniker in Germany. In Great Britain, however, those same field-based specialists without degrees are usually referred to as engineers (or field engineers) -- they even feel insulted when they're called technicians.

Clearly, the Monteur works (mainly) on new installations, hence Steffen's "fitter" fits well -- but again, only in GB: Most Americans don't know what a fitter is. Nor do Americans bother much with functional specialization... installation (Montage), startup (Inbetriebnahme), maintenance (Wartung, Instandsetzung)... it's all service: If you can install it, you can repair it (and vice-versa). Germans tend to disagree with this approach, assigning higher technical competence to the guy who starts something up. The Monteur, on the other hand, can also be fairly low on the intellectual totem pole: He typically installs the equipment, i.e. sets it on its foundation, bolts it all together, makes electrical connections -- but he might never see the equipment in operation, nor is he necessarily responsilbe for software configuration, debugging, fine-tuning, etc.

Since the function of a "Monteur" can fall anywhere on a rather broad scale of technical competence, I think it's best to duck the issue and go with either engineer (for GB) or technician (for US).
Selected response from:

Bernard Myers
France
Local time: 10:04
Grading comment
Great explanation. Thanks!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3instrument technician
Bernard Myers
4instrument and control engineermargrit
4measurement and control engineer
Cécile Kellermayr
3instrument fitter // metering [o. measurement] and control fitter
Steffen Walter


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
measurement and control engineer


Explanation:
müsste stimmen.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-08 08:38:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://engineering.newport.ac.uk/Staff/StaffIT/Ptimothy.htm


    Reference: http://www.recrut.pechiney.com/pechiney/pechrecrutweb.nsf/%0...
Cécile Kellermayr
Austria
Local time: 10:04
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 333
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Meß- u. Regelmonteur
instrument fitter // metering [o. measurement] and control fitter


Explanation:
I'd prefer the first one, based on a glossary received from a customer in the oil and gas industry, which gives "instrument engineer" for "Mess- und Regelungsingenieur".

Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 10:04
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 11870
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
instrument and control engineer


Explanation:
or also instrumentation and control engineer
is how they are called in the oil industry

margrit
Local time: 10:04
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 28
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Meß- u. Regelmonteur
instrument technician


Explanation:
EN-GB: engineer
EN-US: technician

In the States, engineers usually have engineering degrees (4 years or more), same as Dipl.-Ing. in Germany -- and technical specialists without degrees (often field-based) are usually called technicians, same as Techniker in Germany. In Great Britain, however, those same field-based specialists without degrees are usually referred to as engineers (or field engineers) -- they even feel insulted when they're called technicians.

Clearly, the Monteur works (mainly) on new installations, hence Steffen's "fitter" fits well -- but again, only in GB: Most Americans don't know what a fitter is. Nor do Americans bother much with functional specialization... installation (Montage), startup (Inbetriebnahme), maintenance (Wartung, Instandsetzung)... it's all service: If you can install it, you can repair it (and vice-versa). Germans tend to disagree with this approach, assigning higher technical competence to the guy who starts something up. The Monteur, on the other hand, can also be fairly low on the intellectual totem pole: He typically installs the equipment, i.e. sets it on its foundation, bolts it all together, makes electrical connections -- but he might never see the equipment in operation, nor is he necessarily responsilbe for software configuration, debugging, fine-tuning, etc.

Since the function of a "Monteur" can fall anywhere on a rather broad scale of technical competence, I think it's best to duck the issue and go with either engineer (for GB) or technician (for US).

Bernard Myers
France
Local time: 10:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 77
Grading comment
Great explanation. Thanks!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jccantrell: This is a pretty good description of what I would have said, however 'pipe fitter' is pretty well know in the USA.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks for the nod of approval. You're quite right about "pipe fitter," of course, especially in industry -- but no other sort of US "fitter" comes to mind, certainly none having to do with electricity of electronics.

agree  invguy: "Instrument technician' would be my guess, too, albeit without that brilliantly complete explanation. Actually, I copied it to my archive :) Kudos, Bernard!
14 hrs

agree  Teresa Reinhardt: a Monteur is a mechanic, not an engineer
2 days15 hrs
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