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Kegelbahn

English translation: bowling alley

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Kegelbahn
English translation:bowling alley
Entered by: Martin Wenzel
Options:
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16:13 Feb 6, 2009
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tourism & Travel
German term or phrase: Kegelbahn
I would call it a bowling centre, but what if it is the hotel-owned bowling centre in the basement of the hotel...
Martin Wenzel
Germany
Local time: 23:35
bowling alley
Explanation:
bowling alley is the usual term, if you are looking for the name of the building, or bowling lane for the actual lane bit that you play on.


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Note added at 4 mins (2009-02-06 16:17:49 GMT)
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hotel-owned bowling centre in the basement of the hotel..... definately 'bowling alley'

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Note added at 30 mins (2009-02-06 16:43:58 GMT)
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Rethinking a bit on the bowling alley/skittle alley debate, I'm now inclined to say that what you are actually referring to is a skittle alley. However, there is some prejudice against skittle alleys in UK: they can be seen as quite out-dated, not very fashionable, linked to an older generation/country pub culture.

OTOH, bowling alleys are considered to be more fashionable, popular with young people, shiny new places.

I'm guessing what the hotel HAVE is a skittle alley, but from a marketing perspective maybe 'bowling alley' would sound more trendy and inviting. I guess it depends on your text really.
Selected response from:

Frances Bryce
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:35
Grading comment
Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2bowling alley
Frances Bryce
5skittle alley
Robinshaw


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
skittle alley


Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skittles_(sport)#Germany

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Note added at 20 Min. (2009-02-06 16:34:02 GMT)
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I would like to revise may answer. Wiki also gives "nine-pin bowling (alley)" as an option. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine-pin_bowling

Robinshaw
Spain
Local time: 22:35
Does not meet criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 3
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
bowling alley


Explanation:
bowling alley is the usual term, if you are looking for the name of the building, or bowling lane for the actual lane bit that you play on.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2009-02-06 16:17:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

hotel-owned bowling centre in the basement of the hotel..... definately 'bowling alley'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2009-02-06 16:43:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Rethinking a bit on the bowling alley/skittle alley debate, I'm now inclined to say that what you are actually referring to is a skittle alley. However, there is some prejudice against skittle alleys in UK: they can be seen as quite out-dated, not very fashionable, linked to an older generation/country pub culture.

OTOH, bowling alleys are considered to be more fashionable, popular with young people, shiny new places.

I'm guessing what the hotel HAVE is a skittle alley, but from a marketing perspective maybe 'bowling alley' would sound more trendy and inviting. I guess it depends on your text really.

Frances Bryce
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:35
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thanks.
Notes to answerer
Asker: I have always called it that in the past, but somehow I wasn't sure any longer...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Louisa Berry: also used for skittle alley (non motorised)
0 min
  -> Thanks Louisa. Yes.... we used to have a skittle alley in our local pub. Very popular with the locals!

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: bowling has ten pins, kegeln only nine
9 mins
  -> very true. I quite like Martin's "nine-pin bowling alley" option as a way of coping with this.

agree  Courtney Sliwinski: Is what came to my mind.
3 hrs
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