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Bahnräumer und Schienenräumer

English translation: for your information here's what Ernst claims

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11:46 Oct 23, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / Tram design criteria
German term or phrase: Bahnräumer und Schienenräumer
This is a section heading, and here is the first sentence:

"Fahrzeuge müssen vor dem in Fahrtrichtung ersten Radsatz Bahnräumer oder Schienenräumer haben, die eine durch Hindernisse hervorgerufene Entgleisungsgefahr vermindern."

My trusty Kučera gives the same set of translations for both of these words, ranging from "rail guard" to "cowcatcher". However, it looks as though they are supposed to be two separate things, albeit serviing the same purpose.

Can anyone explain the difference, or suggest which is the cowcatcher and which the rail guard?
Richard Benham
France
Local time: 14:23
English translation:for your information here's what Ernst claims
Explanation:
Bahnräumer / cow-catcher (US), sweeper (GB), rail guard
Schienenräumer m (Bahn) / track clearer, rail guard, sweeper (GB), fender (US), pilot (US), cow-catcher (US)

So no real difference it would seem...


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Note added at 3 hrs (2006-10-23 15:27:38 GMT)
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Wickipedia claims they are synonymous, see:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schienenräumer
Selected response from:

Jonathan MacKerron
Grading comment
OK. I decided to treat them as synonymous, and just selected two of the dictionary translations at random (avoiding "cowcatcher" because I thought the prospect of cows wandering on the track of a German city's tramlines to be about as risible as the popular belief that kangaroos can be seen hopping around the major cities of Australia).
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5pilotpcrail
4Depends where you are...David Moore
2for your information here's what Ernst claims
Jonathan MacKerron


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Depends where you are...


Explanation:
If you're in France, they are both called "chasse-pierres" - "stone-chasers". In America, they are called "cow-catchers", and are the vee-shaped attachments you see on the front of American train, because in the good ol' days, they had no fencing, and "cows on the track" was very much a commonplace. In Europe, where this is less of a risk, trains are usually protected by heavy steel downward projections in front of the wheels of any vehicle intended to lead a train - so any locomotive or driving trailer car - which passes about two inches / 5 cm above the rail, and will normally protect the train from derailment as you describe. These latter are known - in the UK at least - as "(rail or track) guard irons".

Hope this explanation is clear; if not, mail me...

David Moore
Local time: 14:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 764
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks David. I didn't want to know what they were; I wanted to know whether they really are different, and, if so, what to call them.

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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
for your information here's what Ernst claims


Explanation:
Bahnräumer / cow-catcher (US), sweeper (GB), rail guard
Schienenräumer m (Bahn) / track clearer, rail guard, sweeper (GB), fender (US), pilot (US), cow-catcher (US)

So no real difference it would seem...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-10-23 15:27:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Wickipedia claims they are synonymous, see:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schienenräumer

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 90
Grading comment
OK. I decided to treat them as synonymous, and just selected two of the dictionary translations at random (avoiding "cowcatcher" because I thought the prospect of cows wandering on the track of a German city's tramlines to be about as risible as the popular belief that kangaroos can be seen hopping around the major cities of Australia).
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887 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Bahnräumer
pilot


Explanation:
Ok, this topic is realy old but just for clarification in the future:
Bahnräumer and Schienenräumer are not the same, but lot of dicitionaries and translation programs make errors with these items.

Bahnräumer ist the snowplow, cowcatcher etc. a V-shaped device in the front of the vehicle. Schienenräumer is a strong metal plate in vertical orientation mounted imediatle in front of the first wheel.

Ernst is unprecise or wrong:

The word cowcatcher is in US only used in relation with old steam engines, modern locomotives have a pilot.

Rail guard is Schienenräumer and not Bahnräumer.

Pilot and Cowcatcher are not Schienenräumer, but Bahnräumer.
Fender is in German used for devices on tramways, which are only released after a sensor bracket hit the obstacle laying in front of the vehicle.


    Reference: http://www.lokifahrer.ch/Lukmanier/Laufwerk.htm
pcrail
Local time: 14:23
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