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Zungenfänge / Zungenfang

English translation: (railway switch) points or switch rail or point blades

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Zungenfänge
English translation:(railway switch) points or switch rail or point blades
Entered by: Steffen Walter
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23:08 Sep 21, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping
German term or phrase: Zungenfänge / Zungenfang
The thin piece of rail which enables trains to change directions (change tracks) when it is 'activated' - wheras trains travel straight ahead when this connection is 'deactivated' (or not connected).

Thanks for your help!
Peter Gabler
Local time: 16:18
tongue blade catch or extension rod catch
Explanation:
Buidance from Ernst, WB der industriellen Technik

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-22 00:29:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have a better answer: points or switch rail or point blades. See below from Wikipedia



Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.



Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.

), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-09-22 05:08:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, railway switch is also a possibility for your translation.
Selected response from:

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 08:18
Grading comment
I also found the Wiki entry you quoted 10 minutes after posting the Kudoz ;-) Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3tongue blade catch or extension rod catch
Dr. Fred Thomson


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tongue blade catch or extension rod catch


Explanation:
Buidance from Ernst, WB der industriellen Technik

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-22 00:29:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have a better answer: points or switch rail or point blades. See below from Wikipedia



Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.



Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as Railroad switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •Jump to: navigation, search

A right-hand railroad switch.
A diagram of a right-hand railroad switch.This article primarily uses North American terminology. British and Commonwealth terms are given in brackets.
A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one track to another. In the UK and Commonwealth countries, railroad switches are known as (sets of) points. In technical usage switches are also called turnouts.

In the diagram on the right, rail track A divides into two: track B (the straight track) and track C (the diverging track). The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.

), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions so as to determine whether a train coming from A will be led towards B or towards C. A train moving from the A direction towards either B or C is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from B or C will be led to A regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move. Passage through a switch in this direction is known as a trailing-point movement.

A switch can be described by the direction in which the diverging track leaves the straight track. A right-hand switch has track C to the right of a straight track formed by A and B. A left-hand switch has track C to the left.

A straight track is not always present; for example, both tracks may curve, one to the left and one to the right (see Wye switch, below) or both tracks may curve, with differing radii, in the same direction.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-09-22 05:08:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, railway switch is also a possibility for your translation.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 08:18
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 37
Grading comment
I also found the Wiki entry you quoted 10 minutes after posting the Kudoz ;-) Thanks
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Changes made by editors
Sep 24, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/23909">Dr. Fred Thomson's</a> old entry - "Zungenfänge / Zungenfang" » " (railway switch) points or switch rail or point blades."
Sep 22, 2007 - Changes made by Dr. Fred Thomson:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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